Forums > General Industry > Portfolio sizes

Photographer

Brian Diaz

Posts: 63192

Danbury, Connecticut, US

I was just curious as to what size prints others are using for their portfolios.  Also, what is your stance on horizontal photos?

May 21 05 10:01 pm Link

Photographer

XtremeArtists

Posts: 9122

9x12 seems to be standard.

I'd love to know any sources for professional-looking but inexpensive cases....

May 21 05 10:03 pm Link

Photographer

S W I N S K E Y

Posts: 24315

Saint Petersburg, Florida, US

http://www.supermodel.com/store/index.p … df2d053009

this portfolio is the standard i have seen in my area, i am told it is also very popular in the NYC market..should last forever...

May 21 05 10:05 pm Link

Photographer

S W I N S K E Y

Posts: 24315

Saint Petersburg, Florida, US

Posted by Brian Diaz: 
I was just curious as to what size prints others are using for their portfolios.  Also, what is your stance on horizontal photos?

9x12 is a standard model portfolio..

landscape (horizontal) images should be two pages wide so the book shouldn't have to be turned on its side to be viewed, or you could put 9" wide images on one page

May 21 05 10:06 pm Link

Photographer

XtremeArtists

Posts: 9122

Posted by Doug Swinskey: 
http://www.supermodel.com/store/index.p … df2d053009

this portfolio is the standard i have seen in my area, i am told it is also very popular in the NYC market..should last forever...

Thanks Doug!

May 21 05 10:13 pm Link

Photographer

Hoodlum

Posts: 10253

Sacramento, California, US

Opps this is for models looking to work with land based agencies, see below for photographers.

First, Do you need a portfolio? If you want to be a net model then a high quality website is probably what you need most. If you want to do land based agency go see's and such your comp card will be your main marketing tool. In fact in most commercial situations the comp card is all you need.

Having said that it is a real good idea to have a portfolio anyway as some clients will want to see it and it�s a great thing to take to shoots to show the photographer or client.


O.K. so you want a models portfolio, here's the basics.

Most models books are 9" by 12" there are other sizes but 9x12 is the standard agency size. If you are freelancing use what you want but if you go to a casting and everybody else has a 9x12 and you have 8x10 you are going to look silly and kind of amateurish. My advice is go with what other real agency models use and odds are 9x12. 

If you land an agency you will use what the agency wants. (Elite has used a smaller book)(you still pay for it) Otherwise, 9x12 is the norm.


You can get portfolios online here.

http://www.models-mart.com/Portfolios.html
If you buy from them get the scuba its simple, classy, no need for fancier ones.

http://www.houseofportfolios.com
Great stuff but not cheap. I have two from them and the quality is outstanding. Great customer service.

http://www.designbureau.net/customportfolios.html
Never used them personally but colleagues have and the books look nice.

Here are a few other sites that sell portfolios

http://www.reedpresentations.com/portfolio/index.html
http://www.artmediaonline.com/artProduc … ctID=21286
http://www.nabookarts.com/portfolios.html
http://www.pinazangaro.com/
http://www.flaxart.com
http://www.lost-luggage.com/store/home.php
http://www.brewer-cantelmo.com/

I just bought a new Pina Zangaro and like it.

Honestly though don't spend to much as it matters far more what you put into your book than what kind of book.

What do I put in my book?

The main thing is not really the size but the content that is the 1st 2nd and 3rd priority in you book. You need to get really kick ass photos in there and only show the best. Don't be tempted to put in more because of all those black page slots. Some books you can take out the unused slots and those are better.

You will be so much better off showing 3 BANG POW images than 3 BANG POW and 10 "yeah, she's pretty" images. You are only as good as your worst shot. I'd rather see 3 wow'ers than 3 wow'ers and 10 "pretty goods".

What booker wants a tour of mediocrity?

EDIT RUTHLESSLY!!!!!!!


How do I organize them?

If you want to make a book that's presentable to an agency you need to do it the agency way.

Here are the basics of a models book. Photographer�s books and Makeup people�s books can be quite different this info is geared to models who are seeking to work in the mainstream world.


1. Nothing fancy, you will be caring it around a lot so if the agency doesn't give you one of theirs keep it simple as they do wear out. I wouldn't spend more than like $75.00 on one. But don't get too cheap, it will reflect on you. Those portfolios with the big handles and zipper are SO out Hello 1980's. A simple Scuba style book like this is all you need. (Example)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/book01.jpg


2. Start with a strong clean Beauty shot. DON'T OVER PHOTOSHOP IT Any manipulation will get trashed, as clients want to see you, not some photoshoped version of you. 95% of the shots on the net are way too over shopped. Clients want to see skin, freckles, pores, skin texture. If they see you have over tweaked it, you lose credibility. They don't give a rats as* about some photographers Photoshop ability. Yes spend some money on a kick ass beauty photographer and a kick ass make-up person. Don't try and fake it. They want to see exactly what you look like. If they cant believe your beauty shot they cant believe your book................ (Example)


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/book02.jpg


3 Start strong your best couple of shots first. Grab the audience. If you don't grab them now you wont grab them latter. If you have shots that have you looking at a left or a right direction put them so they face into the gutter (center of book) (Example)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/book03.jpg

4. Horizontals. First don�t put them in sideways nobody and I repeat nobody wants to sit and spin your book back and forth to look at your shots. Remember a client may be looking at 20 to 100 books in a day trying to decide who is right for a job. Make it hard on them and you loose. Plain and simple. Keep the book vertical to view. There are two ways of doing this.

One-Way is to double-truck them. That means to print them as a 12" by 18" print and then cut it down the middle. If you do this it needs to be a show stopper shot as at that size it takes two slots and therefore demands twice the look. Only do this if the shot is a flat out "bang pow" shot. (Example)


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/book04.jpg

The other way is to print them horizontally on a vertical print. In other words the print will be 9" with by whatever height the image is. You can either go with Black borders on top and bottom or leave them white. Either way is fine. I prefer black as it matches the black paper but is really doesn't mater that much. (Example)


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/book05.jpg

How many

Only your best. No more. And even if you get a boat load of killer shots 15 to 20 is MAX Nobody important is going to view more than that and most likely far far less. If you cant show your ability in 10 shots you need better shots!!! Don't be tempted to fill up the pages. Don't put more than two shots from any shoot no matter how much you like them It shows real inexperience. One shot per set up is normally all you want and besides if you get one killer shot per shoot consider your self lucky.

Its not rocket science. It might not of been how it was done 20 years ago. It might be different in 10 years, but here in 2005 that's how its done in most markets here in the US today.


Now if all you want to be is a "net model" then do it any way you want because only your friends and some tfp weekend warrior isn't going to know the real way of doing things or care.

May 21 05 11:02 pm Link

Photographer

Hoodlum

Posts: 10253

Sacramento, California, US

Posted by Brian Diaz: 
I was just curious as to what size prints others are using for their portfolios.  Also, what is your stance on horizontal photos?

If you are asking about photographers portfolios 11" by 14" is the norm but there is more flexibility in photographer portfolios as they must be higher in quality. I've seen mini books to fur covered books, in the old days one would often have a carousel of duped slides to drop in a Kodak projector.  Unless you have put real planning into your book best keep it safe and use a standard 11" by 14" If you deviate from that make sure it screams WOW!

Horizontal photos, treat them the same way, DON'T make some art director or client sit and have to spin your book back and forth. keep every thing on an even keel.

May 21 05 11:10 pm Link

Photographer

XtremeArtists

Posts: 9122

Damn, I'm always the oddball.

::looks at current 9x12s with contempt::

Posted by Dan Hood:
If your asking about photographers portfolios 11" by 14" is the norm but there is more flexibility in photographer portfolios as they must be higher in quality.

May 21 05 11:22 pm Link

Photographer

Sophistocles

Posts: 21320

Seattle, Washington, US

Dan, that has to be the best answer posted here at MM to date.

Bravo.

If you're ever up here in Seattle, the first round is on me (and I drink the good stuff :-))

May 21 05 11:27 pm Link

Photographer

Hoodlum

Posts: 10253

Sacramento, California, US

As far as photographers portfolios "books"

Let me explain a bit further.

I have seen cowskin books with the fur still on the portfolio, I have seen laminated prints in a box of various sizes, I have seen 14" by 14" books that prints go in either way. In other words photographers are considered to be creative professionals, so there is much more leeway in our books.

When one goes outside the norm it MUST be one cool book. You will be judged on your book, your cover, your presentation, everything.

That's why there are so many custom portfolio makers. The thing is I would stick to a basic portfolio until you have a clear marketing strategy and have identified your target audience. Some of those books can run many hundreds of dollars. My wooden portfolio that has my interior photographs cost over $300.00 but I researched my market well before I decided to go that way. My fashion/beauty book is Plexiglas and my people illustration book is leather. It depends on what you want, just know your market before plunking down large sums of cash.

Granted I am coming at this and giving advice from a advertising photographers perspective and aiming it at photographers who intend on hitting ad agencies, art directors, magazines, creative directors ect.

If you are going to market to say the general pubic and do weddings and portraits then this in may or may not be valid info for you. Just as my advice to models is intended for models who want to work within the agency system.


After looking at what I typed I better add a few things.

I don't mean to imply that for photographers this is the only way to go. There are lots of avenues to use. Also remember my advice above is geared mainly to those who shoot people as other types of photography have their own types of portfolios. Back in the 90's and up to today I shoot a lot of interiors and most architectural/interior photographers don't use a bound book type of portfolio at all.

What a lot of architectural photographers (myself included) used (and still use)is mounted transparencies. Or we would use 16" by 20" mounted prints in a case.

Since almost all architectural photographers use 4" by 5" cameras, showing the original transparency's (slide) is common. We mount them in black mounts with a plastic sleeve. In this shot I have 35mm, 6x9 (21/4) and 4x5 images in the mounts and would carry in a light box to the client to show the work. Clients loved this as they got to see exactly what you shot in camera. No Photoshop or print manipulations possible. Most advertising photographer went this rout too. Digital is changing a lot of stuff but this is still a common way to do it.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/DSCF6825.jpg

Another way some of us would do it would be to mount 16"by 20" prints onto very thin gatorboard and laminate the print. This was the best for presenting to a group and allowed clients to really see the quality of your work including how well you handle small details.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/DSCF6837.jpg

I only mention these types of portfolios as their are many variations on how to present ones craft and not just a bound book type. Currently I use a wooden bound book from Lost Luggage for my interiors now as I shoot some interiors digitally so I show prints. In fact I use all 11" by 14" print books for all the types of work I do. I prefer that size as I still shoot a lot of large and medium format film and the smaller mini books don't really show the detail in my work. But that's what I found my market prefers. Other photographers in other markets will do things differently.

I guess what I'm getting at is as creative professionals we have lots of options for portfolios and there are few hard and fast rules for photographers. Since models have an industry standard they are under a bit more restraint in their presentation.

The only hard and fast absolutes for photographers is make every shot supper solid, you are only as good as your worst shot, edit ruthlessly. And most importantly, All killer no filler.

May 21 05 11:45 pm Link

Photographer

BlackSkyPhoto

Posts: 1130

Danville, California, US


Mine is 13x19 because the girls I show it too like big things...

May 22 05 12:55 am Link

Model

Amber Dawn - Colorado

Posts: 6250

Castle Rock, Colorado, US

I use different sizes anything from 9x11 to 5x7

May 22 05 02:30 am Link

Photographer

FYH Photography

Posts: 460

Santa Clara, California, US

Posted by Chris Ambler: 
Dan, that has to be the best answer posted here at MM to date.

Bravo.

If you're ever up here in Seattle, the first round is on me (and I drink the good stuff :-))

Dan so far gives the best advice I've seen on the subject.  Bravo. 

I only wish he wouldn't constantly mix up "YOUR" and "YOU'RE".  wink 

The English Major in me cringes every time I see that spelling mistake.  wink

May 22 05 02:38 am Link

Photographer

Sophistocles

Posts: 21320

Seattle, Washington, US

Mine is a simple leather book with 8x10 prints, but now you've got me rethinking that.

May 22 05 02:39 am Link

Photographer

FYH Photography

Posts: 460

Santa Clara, California, US

Posted by Chris Ambler: 
Mine is a simple leather book with 8x10 prints, but now you've got me rethinking that.

I use the 8x10 book to show models, Make UP Artists and (perhaps) other photographers.  I use the 9x12 book for REAL clients (or potential clients) and I use that only for them.  Don't like the "wear and tear of casual viewers leafing through the book" so I separate the two.  smile

May 22 05 02:41 am Link

Photographer

Hoodlum

Posts: 10253

Sacramento, California, US

Posted by F.Y. Hamada: 

Dan so far gives the best advice I've seen on the subject.  Bravo. 

I only wish he wouldn't constantly mix up "YOUR" and "YOU'RE".  wink 

The English Major in me cringes every time I see that spelling mistake.  wink

Oh busted by the spelling police for the 2nd night in a row. :-) I hope Tyler doesn't have a 3 strikes law around here.
Now you know why my assistant is also my secretary.

May 22 05 03:06 am Link

Photographer

- null -

Posts: 4576

Posted by Dan Hood: 

Posted by F.Y. Hamada: 

Dan so far gives the best advice I've seen on the subject.  Bravo. 

I only wish he wouldn't constantly mix up "YOUR" and "YOU'RE".  wink 

The English Major in me cringes every time I see that spelling mistake.  wink

Oh busted by the spelling police for the 2nd night in a row. :-) I hope Tyler doesn't have a 3 strikes law around here.
Now you know why my assistant is also my secretary.

I was just about to post how cool it is that someone like Dan is on here giving such great advice. But he messes up "your" and "you're" in his writing?

(sigh)

Well, Dan, I'm sorry but due to grammatical errors, your multiple kudos just got reduced to a single kudo. Life's rough.

May 22 05 03:10 am Link

Photographer

michaelGIORDANO

Posts: 593

Austin, Texas, US

I use the Pratt Press books from France (metal corners with red stitching).  they are 9 1/2x12 (just a wee bit larger than the models books)  And I have gotten numerous compliments on them for the last 10 years.  I was about to get custom made portfolios from House of Portfolios.  BUT, why fix what isn't broken.  I also have the same portfolio in 6x8 minibook when my others are all checked out.  I keep the minibook for myself.  And at first I was hesistant taking the minibook to meetings.  But it turns out the Art Directors absolutely love them.

Buying more now.

I don't think the 11x14 is a must have.  I think it is best to buy what best fits your image and persona.  But I still stick with 9x12 just because everyone is used to them.

May 22 05 03:29 am Link

Photographer

E

Posts: 89

Washington, District of Columbia, US

I use an 11 X 14 aluminum book with screwposts so it expands to fit quite a few pages of images. The front has an open window that shows my logo. The book slips into a nylon cover and I carry both a case made by "Artcase." The case has both horizontal and vertical handles and made of a durable padded dernier or similar material. There is a netted pocket about the size of my PDA case so I can carry my PDA.

I bought my 11 X 14 book at fastportfolios.com for around $180 with extra pages and the art case was on the mark down rack at the Pearl Art store for about $16.00.

If you plan on sending your book out, send a leather one or comparable one because the metal ones scrach the other porfolios when they are stacked, thus, they are usually are placed at the bottom of the stack. I use the aluminum book as a show-me book.

When I showed my book in Sobe I used both my web-site and my 11 X 14 book.


E

May 22 05 06:52 am Link

Wardrobe Stylist

Kuree

Posts: 279

Los Angeles, California, US

Artists : 11x14 is recommended. I haven't met a photographer whose book is smaller than that.

House of Portfolio does name embossing on the cover, which really looks sharp. Other companies usually provide this service as well, the higher end portfolio companies.

Don't spend a lot of money on a portfolio and not have a bag or case to transport it in. Especially w/leather books, the edges get messed up after a while. Always make sure you have extra pages for replacement, they are torn and scratched before you know it. Always nice to have a clean book.

A mini book is a total must have. I put mine in my purse, I always have my work on me. You can keep it in your car. Certainly easier to carry around a mini book than a heavy 11x14 book. To me, having a mini book is more important, if I had to choose between the two. But I definitely have both, I just use the mini book almost everyday, opposed to once a week, that is why it is more important to me.

I had put together a couple 9x12 books, so it was cheaper for me to ship... but you know what? The photos looked better in a bigger book so I changed back.

I hope this helps. smile

May 22 05 07:24 am Link

Photographer

CreativeSandBoxStudio

Posts: 1984

London, England, United Kingdom

Brush Stainless Steel Case(12x14) w/ (5x7) Brush Stainless Steel Mini Book(Studio & my name logo ). I do all 5x7 prints on my Epson printer, along with published work from Magazines to Brouchures(No more than 6). Also along with 8x10 trans boards w/dye-cuts for 4x5 to 2 1/4 trans(usually a 4x5 & 2 1/4 per board) total of 17 per case. Added feature is a mini light box...flat 8x10 for viewing trans boards. I include with this is a bio/dvd portfolio as a leave behind). I have a total of 8 cases(portfolios) and two my rep keeps with her in San Francisco. On average my books are out 4 times a week, so also keeping track of who has what and when is it coming back is tracked like FedEX  or UPS.....I  once had my portfolio keep for a year, becasue the client loved the presentation..I sent him a holdning bill for having it for a year......instead he got me work from having it that long...I did get that case back. I am in the process of changing it once again with a portfolio company out of England. Oh! The reason for 5x7 images(prints) faster turn around in printing dozens in a short period of time and with each case out I tailor it to meet each new client I am seeking out. Guys do your homework before sending out your book, you would hate to send nudies to a client that is a Christian publishing company now wouldn’t you. I have a question for all you shooters......do you have a Delivery Memo with your book when sending out...that lists the contents inside with a   it being signed for upon recieving the book to when it will be shipped back to you...I give ony a window of 72hrs for viewing or else. FIrst if they ask for your book right away expect them to view it right away or if they want more time..communications between the two parties is always keep.

May 22 05 07:38 am Link

Photographer

XtremeArtists

Posts: 9122

Thanks Dan...

Posted by Dan Hood: 

As far as photographers portfolios "books"

Let me explain a bit further.

I have seen cowskin books with the fur still on the portfolio, I have seen laminated prints in a box of various sizes, I have seen 14" by 14" books that prints go in either way. In other words photographers are considered to be creative professionals, so there is much more leeway in our books.

When one goes outside the norm it MUST be one cool book. You will be judged on your book, your cover, your presentation, everything.

That's why there are so many custom portfolio makers. The thing is I would stick to a basic portfolio until you have a clear marketing strategy and have identified your target audience. Some of those books can run many hundreds of dollars. My wooden portfolio that has my interior photographs cost over $300.00 but I researched my market well before I decided to go that way. My fashion/beauty book is Plexiglas and my people illustration book is leather. It depends on what you want, just know your market before plunking down large sums of cash.

Granted I am coming at this and giving advice from a advertising photographers perspective and aiming it at photographers who intend on hitting ad agencies, art directors, magazines, creative directors ect.

If you are going to market to say the general pubic and do weddings and portraits then this in may or may not be valid info for you. Just as my advice to models is intended for models who want to work within the agency system.


After looking at what I typed I better add a few things.

I don't mean to imply that for photographers this is the only way to go. There are lots of avenues to use. Also remember my advice above is geared mainly to those who shoot people as other types of photography have their own types of portfolios. Back in the 90's and up to today I shoot a lot of interiors and most architectural/interior photographers don’t use a bound book type of portfolio at all.

What a lot of architectural photographers (myself included) used (and still use)is mounted transparencies. Or we would use 16" by 20" mounted prints in a case.

Since almost all architectural photographers use 4" by 5" cameras, showing the original transparency’s (slide) is common. We mount them in black mounts with a plastic sleeve. In this shot I have 35mm, 6x9 (21/4) and 4x5 images in the mounts and would carry in a light box to the client to show the work. Clients loved this as they got to see exactly what you shot in camera. No Photoshop or print manipulations possible. Most advertising photographer went this rout too. Digital is changing a lot of stuff but this is still a common way to do it.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/DSCF6825.jpg

Another way some of us would do it would be to mount 16"by 20" prints onto very thin gatorboard and laminate the print. This was the best for presenting to a group and allowed clients to really see the quality of your work including how well you handle small details.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/DSCF6837.jpg

I only mention these types of portfolios as their are many variations on how to present ones craft and not just a bound book type. Currently I use a wooden bound book from Lost Luggage for my interiors now as I shoot some interiors digitally so I show prints. In fact I use all 11" by 14" print books for all the types of work I do. I prefer that size as I still shoot a lot of large and medium format film and the smaller mini books don’t really show the detail in my work. But that’s what I found my market prefers. Other photographers in other markets will do things differently.

I guess what I'm getting at is as creative professionals we have lots of options for portfolios and there are few hard and fast rules for photographers. Since models have an industry standard they are under a bit more restraint in their presentation.

The only hard and fast absolutes for photographers is make every shot supper solid, you are only as good as your worst shot, edit ruthlessly. And most importantly, All killer no filler.



May 22 05 08:05 am Link

Photographer

Stuart Photography

Posts: 5938

Tampa, Florida, US

you rule dan. and im stopping by soon.

May 22 05 08:10 am Link

Photographer

S W I N S K E Y

Posts: 24315

Saint Petersburg, Florida, US

Posted by Chris Ambler: 
Mine is a simple leather book with 8x10 prints, but now you've got me rethinking that.

every photog book i see is 11x14 except my studio mate that uses an 11x17 (compensation)...

my portfolio: http://www.dickblick.com/zz169/46/

May 22 05 08:13 am Link

Photographer

FYH Photography

Posts: 460

Santa Clara, California, US

Posted by Eric Muss-Barnes: 

Posted by Dan Hood: 

Posted by F.Y. Hamada: 

Dan so far gives the best advice I've seen on the subject.  Bravo. 

I only wish he wouldn't constantly mix up "YOUR" and "YOU'RE".  wink 

The English Major in me cringes every time I see that spelling mistake.  wink

Oh busted by the spelling police for the 2nd night in a row. :-) I hope Tyler doesn't have a 3 strikes law around here.
Now you know why my assistant is also my secretary.

I was just about to post how cool it is that someone like Dan is on here giving such great advice. But he messes up "your" and "you're" in his writing?

(sigh)

Well, Dan, I'm sorry but due to grammatical errors, your multiple kudos just got reduced to a single kudo. Life's rough.

ROTLMAO!

May 22 05 01:08 pm Link

Photographer

E

Posts: 89

Washington, District of Columbia, US

I forgot to add...

I use a mini book too, but I load my images onto a CF card in my IPAQ PDA and go through a slide presentation for the person to view.

E

May 22 05 08:21 pm Link

Photographer

Hoodlum

Posts: 10253

Sacramento, California, US

Posted by Eric Muss-Barnes: 

I was just about to post how cool it is that someone like Dan is on here giving such great advice. But he messes up "your" and "you're" in his writing?

(sigh)

Well, Dan, I'm sorry but due to grammatical errors, your multiple kudos just got reduced to a single kudo. Life's rough.

Oh that's just great................my whole life I've been a day late and a kudo short. Now look where I am.........

May 23 05 08:38 am Link

Photographer

not here anymore.

Posts: 1892

San Diego, California, US

I have a simple 8x10.  Hasn't stopped me from getting any work.

May 23 05 01:11 pm Link

Photographer

Ken Pivak Photography

Posts: 837

Los Angeles, California, US

Brian Diaz wrote:
I was just curious as to what size prints others are using for their portfolios.  Also, what is your stance on horizontal photos?

Beware that in LA agencies are starting to downsize their books to a 8.5 x 11.
Make sure when you are joining one to ask...as they will tell anyhow.  But with technology and the use of the internet to submit, we are slowly seeing a reduction in print sizes.
This is something in the works around LA right now, but a traditional 9x12 is still fine.

Remember all markets are different as in what city the agency is located.  Their ways of business are usually dictated by the type of clientelle they hold.  I think most models should also learn PhotoShop a bit, so as the understand how their images will be digitally processed. It can't hurt.

Pixel Fisher

Oct 26 05 03:21 am Link

Model

smashingpandora

Posts: 5

Greenville, North Carolina, US

Dan Hood MM/Moderator wrote:
Oh that's just great................my whole life I've been a day late and a kudo short. Now look where I am.........

I think that you're definitely by far the most helpful person that I've found on the forums thus far... smile  Even if you do have grammatical errors... who gives a flying hoo-ha?  You're trying to help people out, it's not like you're submitting these replies as a formal letter or anything. 

I'll give you a bag of kudos for being oh-so-helpful and informative big_smile

/pam

Oct 26 05 10:41 am Link

Photographer

EBAnderson

Posts: 273

Springfield, Ohio, US

Dan Hood MM/Moderator wrote:
If you are going to market to say the general pubic

Dan shows his sly sense of humor in an incredibly helpful post.

This is inadvertently funniest thing I've read in a long time. It's particularly appropriate for a modeling site.

Oct 26 05 10:56 am Link

Model

Tanya O

Posts: 138

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Awesome post, Dan.  I've bookmarked the thread. I'm an aspiring photography student and am currently taking classes as well. This is so helpful - I didn't know the first thing about putting together a book.

How would one organize black and white vs colour shots? Is it boring to have all colour, then all B&W, or is it disorganized to mix them up?


-Xi

Oct 26 05 04:42 pm Link

Model

Stacy

Posts: 2500

San Diego, California, US

*frantically taking notes*

Oct 26 05 04:46 pm Link

Photographer

lacunha

Posts: 154

Oakland, California, US

11x8.5  Horizontal, mirrors my website almost identically.  Custom made leather book, three of 'em.

Oct 31 05 01:25 am Link

Photographer

Doug Vosler Photo Arts

Posts: 191

Breezy Point, Minnesota, US

I think you all should make this thread a sticky for photogs to refer to.  Loads of good info here.

Oct 31 05 07:38 am Link

Makeup Artist

MakeoverMajic

Posts: 219

Appleton, Wisconsin, US

so makeup artists /stylists  should we use the 9x12 or bigger like the photographers? just curious.
Anna

Oct 31 05 02:00 pm Link

Photographer

La Seine by the Hudson

Posts: 8587

New York, New York, US

MakeoverMajic wrote:
so makeup artists /stylists  should we use the 9x12 or bigger like the photographers? just curious.
Anna

I've seen agencies (for stylists/artists, etc) that use 9x12 and some that use 11x14 but I'd recommend 11x14 if you're not with one or the other. In fact, I'd recommend 11x14 to anybody but a model. It's standard, it's big enough to allow your work to be well-seen, it's not so big that it's difficult to ship or handle or maneuver on a crowded desk.

Oct 31 05 02:22 pm Link

Photographer

Christopher Hartman

Posts: 54149

Buena Park, California, US

Dan Hood MM/Moderator wrote:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/danhood/odd%20stuff/book04.jpg

This is helpful for me.  I hate turning my own book and I didn't know any way around it.  Now I do!!

Oct 31 05 04:15 pm Link

Model

Benny

Posts: 7318

Brooklyn, New York, US

Nov 03 05 01:52 pm Link

Photographer

JenniferMaria

Posts: 1771

Miami Beach, Florida, US

Simple & plain, Dan's the Man.

Nov 03 05 04:21 pm Link