Forums > Hair, Makeup & Styling > License for make up artist

Makeup Artist

Meena Heartsong

Posts: 435

Columbia, Missouri, US

I'm currently attending one of (I believe) only 5 schools in the US that is CIDESCO Certified (International/European standard).
It's 1200 hours which covers licensing hours in all but 1 state (so no additional school is needed when transferring licenses), and take about 10 months. It costs about $10,000.
I'm disappointed we aren't learning more makeup technique, but the skin education is excellent.

Jan 10 11 06:46 am Link

Makeup Artist

MAI klare

Posts: 265

Clovis, California, US

Chace Face wrote:
I'm currently attending one of (I believe) only 5 schools in the US that is CIDESCO Certified (International/European standard).
It's 1200 hours which covers licensing hours in all but 1 state (so no additional school is needed when transferring licenses), and take about 10 months. It costs about $10,000.
I'm disappointed we aren't learning more makeup technique, but the skin education is excellent.

Do you know where the other 4 schools are? Do you know if any are in California?? I'm currently taking an Esthetics course as well about the same tuition cost as $10,000 & I feel cheated. The instructors seems a bit off & I dont feel like I'm getting my full money's worth in education. How is the CIDESCO courses? I know that is top of the line education, skincare wise.

Thanks!

Jan 19 11 12:29 am Link

Makeup Artist

JANET MARISCAL

Posts: 264

South San Francisco, California, US

Mary wrote:
!

in my opinion most of the schools are useless... What they teach you is useless (with a few exceptions)  Unless you are learning FX, schools are totally a waste of money...thats my opinion, different than every school admin out there smile  The fact that they fail to tell you something as simple as "by the way, you cant legally do makeup in any State with our certificate"  just goes to show they could care less about you, they also never tell you that most graduates will never work for money in the industry, they fail to tell you that you will work free for years before you make a dime....it's about your money.....they put teachers in these schools that haven't done beauty makeup in 20 years, or have been at a makeup counter their entire career.   The short workshops taught by real pros in the industry are a much better investment for the new artist.

That's not the case for all school. I agree many out there are totally a waste of time. But where I went I actually learned a whole lot and she did tell us that the 1st year or 2 are the hardest and not to leave our day job. Aside from skincare and makeup application we also learned marketing so that helped a lot In learing how the industry works.

Jan 19 11 12:49 am Link

Makeup Artist

Ms Samantha Marie

Posts: 1377

San Francisco, California, US

MAI klare  wrote:

Do you know where the other 4 schools are? Do you know if any are in California?? I'm currently taking an Esthetics course as well about the same tuition cost as $10,000 & I feel cheated. The instructors seems a bit off & I dont feel like I'm getting my full money's worth in education. How is the CIDESCO courses? I know that is top of the line education, skincare wise.

Thanks!

What part of CA is Clovis in? I may have some suggestions.

Jan 20 11 04:35 am Link

Makeup Artist

Josephine Love MUAH

Posts: 107

Hanover, Maryland, US

School was a really long sometimes tedious process but I'm really glad I was able to do it with some support from my family.  They taught makeup for about a day or two in a 9 month course!  So I didn't learn anything about makeup from them, but I did learn alot about hair and sanitation was DRILLED into us!  I do also think school is what you make of it, you have to put in the effort and research they'll only give you the bare basics.  Some people left barely able to do a blow dry correctly. 

At my state board exam I had a weird feeling we were all praying to the hand sanitizer god! wink  I do think its important for makeup artists to know a lot about contagious disease and proper LEGAL sanitation.  Even more so than a hair stylist since you can't make someone go blind by doing their hair.  That said I don't think it's necessary for everyone but if your not going to do invest in some books and find out the requirements for sanitation which really alcohol doesn't even factor.

Jan 20 11 07:08 am Link

Makeup Artist

EFHerne

Posts: 4

Tampa, Florida, US

You DO NOT need to be a licensed cosmetologist to work in most states.  There are FEDERAL labor laws that apply to all states.  In spite of what your personal state wants to tout as true. 

Here's link to the Hair & Make-up Artists Network for more info:

http://hmartistsnetwork.com/labor-laws

"most freelance artists are considered to be sub-contract workers. Meaning the terms of payment are based upon the terms of the contract between you and the person who hired you. This means that you must have in writing:

    Payment amount
    Agreed payment turn around times
    Overtime
    Kit fee
    Travel reimbursement
    Or even just the work for trade that was agreed upon"

So...make sure you 'get it in writing' that the person you are 'making over' is aware that you are not licensed, do not claim to be, and put somewhere in your contract:

"I work much the same as Glamor Shots, only I come to you."

If there is a Glamor Shots in your state....then it is NOT illegal to style hair and apply make-up without a license.  But--you do need to follow Health Laws regarding sanitation & 'touching' people--example:  NO double dipping....always scoop what you're going to use from container to a palette; never dip wand/pad/applicator directly from 'pot' and put on clients face.  Health codes can be ENFORCED hardcore.  So don't violate those. 

Other than that....NO license is required in most states. 

Besides, once you get licensed, not only will you have a HUGE tuition bill to pay back....but you can only work "under" licensed cosmetologists from the state's list that you live in....and they usually are old, tired, and apathetic about what they do.  Not good role models or teachers.  Learn from the BEST first...then get license if you wish.(and want the bill)

Apr 19 11 03:52 am Link

Makeup Artist

mindfulmakeup

Posts: 30

Omaha, Nebraska, US

Each state has different exemptions by their cosmetology board. For Nebraska, freelance makeup artist fall under and exemption and DO NOT need to be a licensed cosmetologist or esthetician. It's best to call the state that you are working in to make sure you are covered.

Apr 19 11 05:34 am Link

Makeup Artist

Make-up Magic by Megan

Posts: 169

Baltimore, Maryland, US

Cool Artist2005 wrote:

In NJ its  600 hour course....its varies by state and I think the sourse was like 2000 dollars not sure....its been 3 years since I have been in that school.
And I have not made that money back yet doing makeup up.....too many TFCD....howveer I am working out a deal now with a studio that will let me become an independanr contractor and split my profits with them 50/50
A license is good to have God forbid something goes wrong you have the piece of paper backing you up.
I am also looking inot getting liability insurance as well......
Needless to say I have been very busy.
If you have any questions about the licnese feel free to ask me.

It's pretty much the same in MD. Except it was about $4500. and you should be making your money back your work is very good

Apr 20 11 07:27 am Link

Photographer

OpenMinds

Posts: 886

Paradise Valley, Arizona, US

As a photographer, I'm happy to see this thread.
I see so many people popping up as "MUA" on here and I always wonder if they are trained and licensed, which, more often than not, the answer is NO.


The problem is exists not so much in talent and ability, but in accountability.  So you are a great talent... with no license.  All you have to do is have ONE person react badly to a product or process, that person lawyers up, and WHAM...  $100,000.00 lawsuit on you.
I was hired to photograph a client some years ago for just this reason.  A "makeup Artist" had done a makeover on her for a special event, been paid a very small fee, and within hours, my client's skin was burning and reddening.  By morning the condition had worsened to the point of being painful, and requiring a visit to a Doctor.  The doctor asked her what had happened and she explained the progress.  Her medical treatment cost her a couple hundred bucks, so she contacted her attorney in hopes of recovering that medical expense.  The attorney proceeded to build a case for negligence and damages, and the MUA was sued... and lost.  Damages were not publicized, but it DID make local newspapers and those damages were reported as "significant".

I would wager that in ALL states, if you are compensated, you are responsible, or could be held liable for huge damages in the event of a problem.

Apr 20 11 07:37 am Link

Makeup Artist

EmElle Makeup and Hair

Posts: 5013

San Jose, California, US

OpenMinds wrote:
As a photographer, I'm happy to see this thread.
I see so many people popping up as "MUA" on here and I always wonder if they are trained and licensed, which, more often than not, the answer is NO.


The problem is exists not so much in talent and ability, but in accountability.  So you are a great talent... with no license.  All you have to do is have ONE person react badly to a product or process, that person lawyers up, and WHAM...  $100,000.00 lawsuit on you.
I was hired to photograph a client some years ago for just this reason.  A "makeup Artist" had done a makeover on her for a special event, been paid a very small fee, and within hours, my client's skin was burning and reddening.  By morning the condition had worsened to the point of being painful, and requiring a visit to a Doctor.  The doctor asked her what had happened and she explained the progress.  Her medical treatment cost her a couple hundred bucks, so she contacted her attorney in hopes of recovering that medical expense.  The attorney proceeded to build a case for negligence and damages, and the MUA was sued... and lost.  Damages were not publicized, but it DID make local newspapers and those damages were reported as "significant".

I would wager that in ALL states, if you are compensated, you are responsible, or could be held liable for huge damages in the event of a problem.

It wouldn't matter who's licensed or not.  If this situation occurs, a lawsuit just might happen.  The license isn't going to protect anyone.  All the license means is that the artist attended school and learned things about sanitation.  It is not any sort of guarantee that the artist will practice proper sanitation, and many do not outside of school.  In fact, I would think the damages might be higher in that lawsuit if she were licensed, because then they could prove she knew better.

On the other hand, since I don't know the case itself, I wonder how well an artist could be sued for allergic reactions.  If the model says she doesn't have any, or doesn't speak up about any, she is at least partly to blame.  Yes, an artist should know to ask, and should know how to deal with the reactions if they come up.  But if this model had problems hours later, I am not sure the artist could have mitigated her damages.

There's a lot I can't know about the case, but I can say that her having a license would not necessarily have prevented this case from occurring in the first place.

Apr 20 11 09:21 am Link

Makeup Artist

LizW_Makeup

Posts: 1621

Boston, Massachusetts, US

OpenMinds wrote:
The problem is exists not so much in talent and ability, but in accountability.  So you are a great talent... with no license.  All you have to do is have ONE person react badly to a product or process, that person lawyers up, and WHAM...  $100,000.00 lawsuit on you.

That's what liability insurance is for. EmElle is right; a license won't protect you if someone has an allergic reaction. But your story is a very good illustration of why artists should have it... not everyone is even aware of what allergies they might have when they sit in your makeup chair.

I have a liability waiver in my bridal contracts, too (indicating that brides are responsible for disclosing allergies and health concerns, and that I am not liable for skin reactions). You just never know.

Apr 20 11 09:30 am Link

Makeup Artist

Tashie Munster MUA

Posts: 92

Tempe, Arizona, US

I have a question in regards to doing makeup in a salon... I was recently offered a "job" doing makeovers for a salon my friend works for. I was interested but I brought up the fact that I never got my aesthetician license and she said it shouldn't be a problem because I'd only be doing it a few days per month & not an actual employee of the salon. Does this make sense?? I think it would become an issue, even though it is tempting to take that opportunity.

Apr 20 11 08:21 pm Link

Makeup Artist

EmElle Makeup and Hair

Posts: 5013

San Jose, California, US

Tashie Munster wrote:
I have a question in regards to doing makeup in a salon... I was recently offered a "job" doing makeovers for a salon my friend works for. I was interested but I brought up the fact that I never got my aesthetician license and she said it shouldn't be a problem because I'd only be doing it a few days per month & not an actual employee of the salon. Does this make sense?? I think it would become an issue, even though it is tempting to take that opportunity.

You very likely need a license, because you are at a salon, employee or not.

Apr 20 11 09:18 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Visuelle Artistry

Posts: 364

Lewisville, Texas, US

Just fyi ... for all the Texan makeup artist out there I contacted the (tdlr) Texas dept. of Licensing and regulations ... and there is no license needed just to apply makeup !!

Apr 21 11 12:14 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Minx GlamourMakeup

Posts: 70

Detroit, Michigan, US

MI's site says:

The Michigan Board of Cosmetology was created under Article 12 of Public Act 299 of 1980, as amended, to license and regulate the practice of cosmetology in Michigan. Article 12 defines cosmetology as one of the following services or a combination of the following services: Hair care services, skin care services, manicuring services and electrology.

The members of the cosmetology industry who are licensed by the department include schools of cosmetology, both public and private, beauty shops, cosmetologists, manicurists, cosmetology instructors, electrologists, estheticians (skin care specialists) and natural hair culturists (braiders).

Technically nothing about makeup ...

Apr 21 11 12:38 pm Link

Makeup Artist

EmElle Makeup and Hair

Posts: 5013

San Jose, California, US

Minx GlamourMakeup wrote:
MI's site says:

The Michigan Board of Cosmetology was created under Article 12 of Public Act 299 of 1980, as amended, to license and regulate the practice of cosmetology in Michigan. Article 12 defines cosmetology as one of the following services or a combination of the following services: Hair care services, skin care services, manicuring services and electrology.

The members of the cosmetology industry who are licensed by the department include schools of cosmetology, both public and private, beauty shops, cosmetologists, manicurists, cosmetology instructors, electrologists, estheticians (skin care specialists) and natural hair culturists (braiders).

Technically nothing about makeup ...

Look up what an esthetician does.  Then tell me there's nothing about makeup.

Apr 21 11 01:34 pm Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

OpenMinds wrote:
As a photographer, I'm happy to see this thread.
I see so many people popping up as "MUA" on here and I always wonder if they are trained and licensed, which, more often than not, the answer is NO.


The problem is exists not so much in talent and ability, but in accountability.  So you are a great talent... with no license.  All you have to do is have ONE person react badly to a product or process, that person lawyers up, and WHAM...  $100,000.00 lawsuit on you.
I was hired to photograph a client some years ago for just this reason.  A "makeup Artist" had done a makeover on her for a special event, been paid a very small fee, and within hours, my client's skin was burning and reddening.  By morning the condition had worsened to the point of being painful, and requiring a visit to a Doctor.  The doctor asked her what had happened and she explained the progress.  Her medical treatment cost her a couple hundred bucks, so she contacted her attorney in hopes of recovering that medical expense.  The attorney proceeded to build a case for negligence and damages, and the MUA was sued... and lost.  Damages were not publicized, but it DID make local newspapers and those damages were reported as "significant".

I would wager that in ALL states, if you are compensated, you are responsible, or could be held liable for huge damages in the event of a problem.

as people have already stated... It makes no difference if you are licensed...if you hurt someone you are going to probably get sued. This is why we carry liability insurance.  I keep up on this stuff and tried to google the circumstances you mentioned and couldn't find it.... This is normally something I could find on the internet even if it were local if the artist were sued.    Normally you can trace a cosmetic reaction (and thats what this sounds like)  to the cosmetic manufacturer and that company has much deeper pockets than an artist and so I would assume a good lawyer would go after the cosmetics company.

You said that she had hundreds of dollars in medical bills.  It interests me that the artist was sued for a "substantial amount of money" over a few hundred dollars in medical bills...it also seem odd that an attorney would take on a case where the damages were a few hundred dollars.  I think something is missing in this story?   It is also odd that I can't find it anywhere on the net and yet substantial amounts of money were involved and you said it was in your public newspaper...these court records are open to the public.

I have to question the story because In all my years in this business I have never seen an artist successfully sued, even when I think they should be.

I would challenge anyone to find me a story somewhere where an artist was successfully sued  and lost... Not a second hand story but a real story from a legit source.  Anyone?

Apr 21 11 02:57 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Judith Annette

Posts: 1

New York, New York, US

New York State does NOT require a makeup artist to have a license to work in any facet of the makeup industry (just the makeup industry, this does not include hair/nails/waxing).  A certificate will suffice as a professional credential and helps you to be viewed as a more serious artist, not to mention you can ask for more money, but it is not necessary in NYC since most places will want to see your work (portfolio, tear sheets, etc.) which speaks for itself in proving that you're a professional artist. 

A Cosmetology license is for hairdressers but is the mother of licenses in the beauty industry since it requires the most hours and widest range of education.  H

New York Cosmetology License Requirements
Cosmetologist (hairdresser):1,000 hours
Esthetician: 600 hours
Nail Specialist: 250 hours
Natural Hairstylist: 300 hours
Waxer: 75 hours

Here is a link for the two makeup schools in NYC that do provide certification options.  My certificate has helped me get pro artist membership (deep discounts) at Bobbi Brown, MAC, Makeup Forever to name a few. 
http://education-portal.com/make-up_art … asses.html

For the girl that went to MUD, they do offer certification/licensing options.  Contact the school directly and ask THEM how you get your certificate since you completed the program.

Jul 23 12 05:18 am Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

Julie Castro wrote:
New York State does NOT require a makeup artist to have a license to work in any facet of the makeup industry (just the makeup industry, this does not include hair/nails/waxing).  A certificate will suffice as a professional credential and helps you to be viewed as a more serious artist, not to mention you can ask for more money, but it is not necessary in NYC since most places will want to see your work (portfolio, tear sheets, etc.) which speaks for itself in proving that you're a professional artist. 

A Cosmetology license is for hairdressers but is the mother of licenses in the beauty industry since it requires the most hours and widest range of education.  H

New York Cosmetology License Requirements
Cosmetologist (hairdresser):1,000 hours
Esthetician: 600 hours
Nail Specialist: 250 hours
Natural Hairstylist: 300 hours
Waxer: 75 hours

Here is a link for the two makeup schools in NYC that do provide certification options.  My certificate has helped me get pro artist membership (deep discounts) at Bobbi Brown, MAC, Makeup Forever to name a few. 
http://education-portal.com/make-up_art … asses.html

For the girl that went to MUD, they do offer certification/licensing options.  Contact the school directly and ask THEM how you get your certificate since you completed the program.

are you saying someone with a Makeup school certificate can go into a hair salon and legally apply makeup for money in NY?

Jul 23 12 11:59 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Visuelle Artistry

Posts: 364

Lewisville, Texas, US

Julie Castro wrote:
New York State does NOT require a makeup artist to have a license to work in any facet of the makeup industry (just the makeup industry, this does not include hair/nails/waxing).  A certificate will suffice as a professional credential and helps you to be viewed as a more serious artist, not to mention you can ask for more money, but it is not necessary in NYC since most places will want to see your work (portfolio, tear sheets, etc.) which speaks for itself in proving that you're a professional artist.)


I agree that a pro's work does speak for itself and will help you be taken as a serious artist... and will help you to get more work, and be able to get your asking rates !!

But honestly anyone can find a certificate online and print it out ... and have you ever been asked to provide a document, certificate or license stating your makeup training or education ...  because in 20 yrs I haven't.

Makeup training and education are important ... whether your self taught, mentored or educated in makeup schools ... but its your talent and drive that will take you far.

Jul 24 12 07:22 am Link

Hair Stylist

Angel Graves

Posts: 2358

Fort Collins, Colorado, US

It seems to me that for the number of states I have lived in that that state's cosmetology board is the word on your licensing to provide services in call at a salon or out call for a salon but most do not govern you as a non salon contractor. I currently have 2 independent contractor licenses, one covers my salon hair services and makeup and one covers just makeup & special occasion hair styling (I do not provide traditional salon hair services in this state).

When in doubt the board of cosmetology is always my go to for the proper rules for where you live/work if you provide services via a salon or spa. 
Ironically, this same board governs my tattoo work as well in the state I reside in.

Jul 25 12 09:00 pm Link

Hair Stylist

just hairs

Posts: 15

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US

in response to tashie munster.

EmElle gave sound advice.

however,in PA you can work in a salon without a license as long as someone at the salon has a teacher's license.

i don't know if arizona works that way,but it might be worth checking into.it can be a good way to earn hours with the state.

might be something for the OP to think about too.

Jul 25 12 11:10 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Julia Spenadel

Posts: 16

Rockville, Maryland, US

Aleksandra Ambrozy  wrote:
Hi everyone, I have a questions. Do you need a license to apply make up? If yes, in which states and what does it apply to? I am confused.
thanks!

No you don't! I know plenty of successful(older) makeup artists who don't have a license.

Going to school for makeup only became a "thing" in the past 20 or so years.

Now to do stuff like facials , waxing, hair cutting, you usually need a license.

btw. Went to MUD too! *high five*

Jul 26 12 06:05 am Link

Makeup Artist

Heather J M

Posts: 718

London, England, United Kingdom

Tracy Kane hairmakeup wrote:
What about the UK? also I know this is slightly hijacking but what about Insurance? I used NHF however I'm keen to find out about other companies.

T x

This whole debate does not apply in the UK. There is no licence or recognised qualification in makeup. You can get an NVQ or even a degree, but not having one makes no difference and getting public liability insurance is not dependent on a certificate.

If you wanted to work as a beauty therapist or hair stylist in a salon, they would require proof of training (course or apprentice hours etc). But nothing much stops you trading without these.

They talk from time to time about bringing in standards but since the established makeup artists are not interested it won't happen. It needs them to sign up first otherwise the whole thing is a farce.

Jul 26 12 04:25 pm Link

Model

Jenn Dugan

Posts: 1

Albany, New York, US

This whole thing is STILL so confusing to me.  I am a NYS resident, and according to the NYS Department of licensing,

"The practice of "esthetics" means providing for a fee, or any consideration or exchange, whether direct or indirect, services to enhance the appearance of the face, neck, arms, legs, and shoulders of a human being by the use of compounds or procedures including makeup, eyelashes, depilatories, tonics, lotions, waxes, sanding and tweezing, whether performed by manual, mechanical, chemical or electrical means and instruments but shall not include the practice of electrology."

To me this sounds like EVERY SINGLE NYS MAKEUP ARTIST should be have an aesthetician license, though I know it is uncommon for production (Film, photography, commercial, etc) makeup artists to have one. 

I am self taught, and have been doing makeup for film for the last year, but wanted to branch out into bridal.  Not sure if I should take the time/spend the money just to get a license for 80% of which I won't use again (facials, waxing, etc).

The question is this: Do you go with standard practice (no license) or what is legal (license)??

Aug 22 12 09:01 am Link

Makeup Artist

CMaquillage

Posts: 487

New York, New York, US

Julie Castro wrote:
New York State does NOT require a makeup artist to have a license to work in any facet of the makeup industry (just the makeup industry, this does not include hair/nails/waxing).  A certificate will suffice as a professional credential and helps you to be viewed as a more serious artist, not to mention you can ask for more money, but it is not necessary in NYC since most places will want to see your work (portfolio, tear sheets, etc.) which speaks for itself in proving that you're a professional artist. 

A Cosmetology license is for hairdressers but is the mother of licenses in the beauty industry since it requires the most hours and widest range of education.  H

New York Cosmetology License Requirements
Cosmetologist (hairdresser):1,000 hours
Esthetician: 600 hours
Nail Specialist: 250 hours
Natural Hairstylist: 300 hours
Waxer: 75 hours

Here is a link for the two makeup schools in NYC that do provide certification options.  My certificate has helped me get pro artist membership (deep discounts) at Bobbi Brown, MAC, Makeup Forever to name a few. 
http://education-portal.com/make-up_art … asses.html

For the girl that went to MUD, they do offer certification/licensing options.  Contact the school directly and ask THEM how you get your certificate since you completed the program.

Wrong wrong wrong ...

NYS  requires a cosmetology or esthetics license ONLY in a salon setting .. where your are working on the public in exchange for money for services. Read the laws.

Now the conundrum is it is not highly enforced. There are no makeup police and I don't know of anyone in NY ever being fined though I'm sure there are some out there . I believe in California it is strictly enforced .

When working n film, tv , photoshoots etc you are not working with the public you are working on a fellow employee so the law doesn't effect us.

Makeup school certificates are worth the paper they are printed on , they mean absolutely nothing, just that you completed a makeup course. I can probably make my own on my computer.  Yes some companies except them for discounts, that being the only perk . And I'm not devaluing school by any means, I went to fx school ...but I've been in the biz long enough to know NO ONE cares about a certificate.

Now if you plan to work in a salon doing makeup I would get a Cosmo or esthetics license ..just to cover your bases ...and that will make you that more valuable to the salon ..they'd be more likely to hire someone With one then without, but that's my opinion .

Now there have been a few self proclaimed fighters that are trying to pass laws to make a license for makeup but both have been exposed to be self serving and to boost their businesses, they own makeup schools, and the only ones to benefit would be the schools. It's a can of worms that doesn't need to be opened . A least not yet . There's just to many issues that need to be covered if there was even a license required for makeup ...and do we really want state controlled makeup schools ? 

So long story short , to late, if school will benefit you and your career choice by all means do it. What you learn is more important then the certificate . If you want to work in a salon get an esthetics license.

Aug 23 12 07:44 am Link

Photographer

ontherocks

Posts: 22618

Salem, Oregon, US

most of my MUAs work at makeup counters (nordstrom, sephora). they are all highly experienced and i think they have training, too. how much they get paid i have no idea.

what i've seen is a reluctance for some MUAs to do hair. also when i ask at hair salons often those ladies won't work off-site.

for my part i'm hopeful that they are hygienic in their practices so a customer doesn't get an infection or something.

Cool Artist2005 wrote:
ANd if you wind up working in retail at the makeup counters they don't give a shit that you have a license they will pay you almost nothing....they rather hire a girl right from highschool than pay someone who has goen to school.

Aug 23 12 10:57 am Link

Model

MistyJadeCreech

Posts: 1

Cookeville, Tennessee, US

hi just wondering what about in TN freelance? thanks?!!!

Jan 21 13 07:44 pm Link

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Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

EFHerne wrote:
You DO NOT need to be a licensed cosmetologist to work in most states.  There are FEDERAL labor laws that apply to all states.  In spite of what your personal state wants to tout as true. 

Here's link to the Hair

Jan 21 13 08:06 pm Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

CMaquillage wrote:

Wrong wrong wrong ...

NYS  requires a cosmetology or esthetics license ONLY in a salon setting .. where your are working on the public in exchange for money for services. Read the laws.

Now the conundrum is it is not highly enforced. There are no makeup police and I don't know of anyone in NY ever being fined though I'm sure there are some out there . I believe in California it is strictly enforced .

When working n film, tv , photoshoots etc you are not working with the public you are working on a fellow employee so the law doesn't effect us.

Makeup school certificates are worth the paper they are printed on , they mean absolutely nothing, just that you completed a makeup course. I can probably make my own on my computer.  Yes some companies except them for discounts, that being the only perk . And I'm not devaluing school by any means, I went to fx school ...but I've been in the biz long enough to know NO ONE cares about a certificate.

Now if you plan to work in a salon doing makeup I would get a Cosmo or esthetics license ..just to cover your bases ...and that will make you that more valuable to the salon ..they'd be more likely to hire someone With one then without, but that's my opinion .

Now there have been a few self proclaimed fighters that are trying to pass laws to make a license for makeup but both have been exposed to be self serving and to boost their businesses, they own makeup schools, and the only ones to benefit would be the schools. It's a can of worms that doesn't need to be opened . A least not yet . There's just to many issues that need to be covered if there was even a license required for makeup ...and do we really want state controlled makeup schools ? 

So long story short , to late, if school will benefit you and your career choice by all means do it. What you learn is more important then the certificate . If you want to work in a salon get an esthetics license.

This is right on the money.....

Jan 21 13 08:06 pm Link

Makeup Artist

JennCassidyMUA

Posts: 1

Kansas City, Missouri, US

Seems like everyone has an opinion about "most states" instead of answering the original question of the laws of the state that the OP wants to do makeup artistry in; many of these reply posts indicate that MUAs aren't even aware of their own states' laws or licensing requirements... This clearly makes them unqualified to give advice in their own state, let alone about the other states in which they do not practice makeup artistry. The OP was asking about Pennsylvania. If you don't practice in Pennsylvania, then all of your information on other states really doesn't help with her question. Every state has different requirements, but since she's asking about Pennsylvania, all the posts about California, New Jersey, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, or even Missouri, the state in which I practice, are completely irrelevant. Just an observation. No wonder she's still confused!! Essentially you all hijacked her post, and this is kinda rude.

Feb 21 13 11:07 am Link

Makeup Artist

Visuelle Artistry

Posts: 364

Lewisville, Texas, US

Wow ... if were all so rude to the original poster why are you chiming in after 7 yrs ... because this post is from 7 yrs ago ... really ??

Feb 21 13 02:52 pm Link

Makeup Artist

EmElle Makeup and Hair

Posts: 5013

San Jose, California, US

Jenn:  The original post said this:  "Hi everyone, I have a questions. Do you need a license to apply make up? If yes, in which states and what does it apply to? I am confused.
thanks!"

Where was she asking, in the OP, about Pennsylvania?  Maybe she was looking to venture beyond the borders into other states.  Many artists do this.  The question was appropriate, and the answers about other states appropriate.

And the next poster, just before mine, is correct.  This is an OLD thread.  If the OP didn't think we hijacked the thread and were rude, then we didn't and we weren't.

Question was asked and answered.

Edit:  I just read all four of the OP's posts in this thread.  Nothing about making this specific to her state.  And she thanked everyone for their answers.

Feb 21 13 04:14 pm Link

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Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

LOL!  I smell a troll.  Who makes their first appearance on a message board REPRIMANDING people that may have already died of natural causes smile

Feb 21 13 05:57 pm Link

Makeup Artist

MakeupByVixen

Posts: 24

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

In Nevada AND Oregon they don't even TEACH makeup application--and it is not REQUIRED by LAW to have a certification or LICENSE to do makeup. I was fairly clear on the subject for Oregon because I was quite good friends with a woman who used to teach in one of the beauty academies there and they only held short 2 hour seminars on it ONCE A MONTH. In Nevada, you don't have to have a license to put makeup on anyone anywhere...and yes, you can get paid. tongue

In fact, while researching the subject, there's this horrible article (several in fact) about people going around threatening to shut down people doing such things by claiming that they were required to pay a fee and attend an academy to put makeup on anyone (or even teach someone to do the same techniques). There were on the upwards of 1,000 women who paid fees to false companies claiming to "legally certify" them. It was quite sad.

I'm getting off topic, I apologize. lol

AND OMG I am so sorry if I bumped an already old thread. Embarrassing.

Feb 21 13 10:13 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Bloom Makeup Artistry

Posts: 349

New York, New York, US

I have been thinking about turning my company into an LLC to avoid being sued and having my personal assets at stake.

Since I don't have a license is it even possible to do this with my business?

Feb 23 13 08:32 am Link

Makeup Artist

EmElle Makeup and Hair

Posts: 5013

San Jose, California, US

Yes.

Feb 23 13 10:55 am Link

Model

Cree Synster

Posts: 275

Milledgeville, Georgia, US

EFHerne wrote:
http://hmartistsnetwork.com/labor-laws

"most freelance artists are considered to be sub-contract workers. Meaning the terms of payment are based upon the terms of the contract between you and the person who hired you. This means that you must have in writing:

    Payment amount
    Agreed payment turn around times
    Overtime
    Kit fee
    Travel reimbursement
    Or even just the work for trade that was agreed upon"

I do some make up artist working on the sides and I have this copy/pasted into my business bit on my site. I have gotten the question so many times "are you licensed?" when I offer to help out with make up, which mentally I want to smack myself in the face for because as many, many others have commented "They're virtually useless and not worth the money spent on them" =/

Feb 27 13 07:20 am Link

Makeup Artist

NikoleAyala HAIR MUA

Posts: 1

San Francisco, California, US

Technically, yes YOU MUST BE LICENSED, makeup is technically a CHEMICAL and ALSO you CAN'T have direct contact w/ skin to skin, or hair unless you're a LICENSED PROFESSIONAL! If you are a makeup artist, and are being PAID, you MUST BE LICENSED (State Board) as either as a COSMETOLOGIST OR ESTHETICIAN! If State Board finds out, you will be heavily FINED and PENALIZED!
Alot of people don't want to go to school, basically making easy money without any real education/schooling, but a lot of NON LICENSED MUA'S don't know PROPER DISINFECTION AND SANITATION, so not only are you putting yourself at RISK but your CLIENT.
Being licensed has alot more gateway than most people think. I mean would you go to a doctor if they had NO medical education or background/ Licensure? or a surgeon with NO credibility and proper mechanics/ disinfection/sanitation? Probably not! same logic. Some will disagree with me.
Being licensed has more advantages than a certification. Like having a Driver's License, which is a privilege not a right, you have to be properly trained/educated on the mechanics of a car in order to drive (Stop, Gas, Left/Right blinker etc). People get away with being a MUA only if you work in a retail environment, because Cosmetic companies have special licensing as required by State Board, but even then that's sketchy. Sephora, for ex has many non licensed individuals, and I would never use their tester brushes or products due to improper disinfection/sanitation.  Why wouldn't you want to be licensed?  I am a CA LICENSED COSMETOLOGIST. I just called State Board, and got this info.
If the tables were turned for NON LICENSED Pro's and were LICENSED, I GUARANTEE they'd react the same way! Essentially STEALING jobs from people who WENT THROUGH THE PROPER SCHOOLING/EDUCATION to obtain the LICENSURE.

Cosmetology covers EVERYTHING, basically licensed to do EVERYTHING (hair, nails, skin etc), Esthetics covers skin/face!!!!
******Currently only licensed cosmetologists & estheticians by the Board can apply make-up for compensation*****
All Freelance makeup artists who are NOT LICENSED estheticians or cosmetologists doing weddings and other makeup jobs for compensation are doing it ILLEGALLY. No matter how qualified and talented, cannot work in Salon, Spas, or in weddings unless they are LICENSED cosmetologists or estheticians.

Aug 29 13 12:23 pm Link

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Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

NikoleAyala HAIR  MUA wrote:
Technically, yes YOU MUST BE LICENSED, makeup is technically a CHEMICAL and ALSO you CAN'T have direct contact w/ skin to skin, or hair unless you're a LICENSED PROFESSIONAL! If you are a makeup artist, and are being PAID, you MUST BE LICENSED (State Board) as either as a COSMETOLOGIST OR ESTHETICIAN! If State Board finds out, you will be heavily FINED and PENALIZED!
Alot of people don't want to go to school, basically making easy money without any real education/schooling, but a lot of NON LICENSED MUA'S don't know PROPER DISINFECTION AND SANITATION, so not only are you putting yourself at RISK but your CLIENT.
Being licensed has alot more gateway than most people think. I mean would you go to a doctor if they had NO medical education or background/ Licensure? or a surgeon with NO credibility and proper mechanics/ disinfection/sanitation? Probably not! same logic. Some will disagree with me.
Being licensed has more advantages than a certification. Like having a Driver's License, which is a privilege not a right, you have to be properly trained/educated on the mechanics of a car in order to drive (Stop, Gas, Left/Right blinker etc). People get away with being a MUA only if you work in a retail environment, because Cosmetic companies have special licensing as required by State Board, but even then that's sketchy. Sephora, for ex has many non licensed individuals, and I would never use their tester brushes or products due to improper disinfection/sanitation.  Why wouldn't you want to be licensed?  I am a CA LICENSED COSMETOLOGIST. I just called State Board, and got this info.
If the tables were turned for NON LICENSED Pro's and were LICENSED, I GUARANTEE they'd react the same way! Essentially STEALING jobs from people who WENT THROUGH THE PROPER SCHOOLING/EDUCATION to obtain the LICENSURE.

Cosmetology covers EVERYTHING, basically licensed to do EVERYTHING (hair, nails, skin etc), Esthetics covers skin/face!!!!
******Currently only licensed cosmetologists & estheticians by the Board can apply make-up for compensation*****
All Freelance makeup artists who are NOT LICENSED estheticians or cosmetologists doing weddings and other makeup jobs for compensation are doing it ILLEGALLY. No matter how qualified and talented, cannot work in Salon, Spas, or in weddings unless they are LICENSED cosmetologists or estheticians.

I understand you're upset that you paid the money and did the time, only to lose jobs to artists that didn't go this route...but the above statement if not factual and  true for all States and so it needs to be expanded upon.

California has an exemption for those working as freelancers in the entertainment industry.  A freelancer can do makeup without a license and in fact most industry artists in California are not licensed and only a small portion ever had formal training.

If you're in a salon setting, yes you need a license..  If you're selling makeup in a store you do not need to be licensed to apply makeup...Do you find that odd?  Applying makeup is applying makeup right?  Wrong... When you have big money behind you (enter MAC Daddy Lauder) even the States cower and bend the rules. 

I normally advise California freelance artists (those doing work outside of salons) to save their money, as a freelancer in the film, TV and Print industry
a license or certificate won't help you.  As a bridal artist you legally need to have a license in Ca. but most don't and I've never seen or heard of a real case where anyone was fined but it's a possibility in theory..taking that chance is up to you... DO carry liability insurance at least... because California has an abundance of out of work ambulance chasing attorneys....If you're poor and have nothing to lose in a lawsuit, why bother?

There is an ethical side to this debate that I agree with... you need to be educated on how to keep people safe and keep your products clean...this can be learned in 1 to 2 hours, it doesn't require months of washed up beauty school instructor training (not that all cosmetology teachers are washed up but let's admit this is not the cream of the crop) 

I believe new artists should make it their mission to learn the rules of sanitation, obtain insurance and  put their time and training into testing and portfolio building... save the school money because testing and portfolio building is a huge investment.

Aug 29 13 10:49 pm Link