Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > Painterly feel effect

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

How people achieve that?

is, the only way, to remove noise (much noise) to get that?

i tried d&b, and shadow/highlights but aren't as powerful as removing the noise (it seems, for me) but with my method, seems like a bit different the result.

any other way to do it?

examples:

http://ibarraphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Steampunks.jpg

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/111115/13/4ec2d8ef42fe1.jpg

Jan 02 12 07:13 am Link

Photographer

Nephrite_Imagines

Posts: 275

Rome, Lazio, Italy

To me, the first photo isn't particularly 'painterly'. The second is closer, but still doesn't seem like a painting.

I do it by capturing the image in low light, then I play with the colour saturation and vibrancy, as well as the contrast.

Jan 02 12 07:31 am Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

yes i know it's not a very paint effect, in fact i want only that little feel like these examples.

usually after all my workflow, at very last i reduce noise and add low percentage of virtual monochromatic noise for the depth, and depending on the size of the subject (full body or half body) i come across an almost good result, but i'm not satisfied, something is different.

and i think they don't use the reduce noise to get that feel

Jan 02 12 07:43 am Link

Photographer

BTHPhoto

Posts: 6839

Fairbanks, Alaska, US

Regardless of the adjective you use, the histograms for those two images can give you some hints about achieving the effect.  In both images, the histogram is pulled back a little from the right side, the mass of the histogram is left of the mid-point, and in both, while there is a kernel of blacks blocked up on the left side, the trend of the mass approaches zero on the y axis at above zero on the x axis. That's a long winded way of saying using curves or levels to short the histogram on both ends is one part of getting the effect.

http://www.bthphoto.com/histoexamples.jpg

I'd also say it's likely that both of those have some cross-processing effect applied.

http://www.bthphoto.com/xprocessexample.jpg

Jan 02 12 07:54 am Link

Photographer

ChanStudio - OtherSide

Posts: 5346

Alpharetta, Georgia, US

Daniele Burza wrote:
How people achieve that?

is, the only way, to remove noise (much noise) to get that?

i tried d&b, and shadow/highlights but aren't as powerful as removing the noise (it seems, for me) but with my method, seems like a bit different the result.

any other way to do it?

examples:

http://ibarraphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Steampunks.jpg

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/111115/13/4ec2d8ef42fe1.jpg

Try open answer level layer.  Change the RGB's value.

  To me, none of these images are painterly.  It is more adjusting the RGB's value.

Jan 02 12 08:00 am Link

Photographer

Deirdre Holmes

Posts: 1264

San Pedro, California, US

There are two different looks you are asking about a glazed look is a little different than the 'painterly' thing. 
I think you need to take a look at the 'glazed' look forum post - http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=529697
Has lots of great info about each.

Jan 02 12 08:25 am Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

yes there's there's cross process on red and blue and maybe a bit on the green curves, plus i think exposure/gamma or rgb curve for the false blacks and whites (glazed look).

so there's toning, that helps for that effect. but i still don't understand how a non-reduced noise image can achieve that feel

i can say with a watercolor filter in softlight (reducing opacity) can bring a shape like that feel, but differently from the reduce noise thing, is more noisy-pixelated.

sorry for my english, it isn't my first language!

Jan 02 12 08:30 am Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Aside from the lighting (which is very important), I think the effect you see in these two examples is mainly cross-processing. Check the RGB values in the shadows and highlights to see how they're crossed. The following edits were done with curves.

http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/4495/crossprocessr.jpg

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/3670/crossprocess2.jpg

Jan 02 12 08:31 am Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

Deirdre Holmes wrote:
There are two different looks you are asking about a glazed look is a little different than the 'painterly' thing. 
I think you need to take a look at the 'glazed' look forum post - http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=529697
Has lots of great info about each.

i know that thread, i've read everything if you see the last post is mine, without receiving no more answer i edited that to write a new thread

Jan 02 12 08:32 am Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

Peano but it seems (for me) that in the examples, the subjects are a bit more "plastic" (see the faces), but just a bit

Jan 02 12 08:36 am Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Daniele Burza wrote:
Peano but it seems (for me) that in the examples, the subjects are a bit more "plastic" (see the faces), but just a bit

Could be. That's easily done in various ways -- NR, surface blur, or a plug-in like Portraiture.

Jan 02 12 09:05 am Link

Photographer

Brian T Rickey

Posts: 4008

Saint Louis, Missouri, US

I know the top picture is Jaime Ibarra. He is on this site and does give tutorials.  He is a very nice guy and will talk your ear off. 


http://www.modelmayhem.com/59023


and no Jaime does not blur his pictures, trust me.  borat

Jan 02 12 09:11 am Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

what do you think about this?

this time i didn't use the strong remove noise.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/120102/15/4f023d59bb821.jpg

Jan 02 12 03:32 pm Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Daniele Burza wrote:
what do you think about this?

this time i didn't use the strong remove noise.

Looks nice. Here's another interpretation. There's no right or wrong in any of this. I wanted to pull the light in on the face a bit more and mellow out the overall tone ... (If this shot were for a clothing advertisement, then this treatment obviously wouldn't do.)

http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/Forums/painterly2-1.gif

http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/Forums/painterly2.jpg

Jan 02 12 03:57 pm Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

a question, you didn't contrast it right?

(asking this because in the "glaze" thread i read that these styles usually use low global contrast / tone contrast)

you got down the light a bit + did something with the curve for the color, am i right?

anyway good, i like that tone

Jan 02 12 04:13 pm Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Daniele Burza wrote:
a question, you didn't contrast it right?

(asking this because in the "glaze" thread i read that these styles usually use low global contrast / tone contrast)

you got down the light a bit + did something with the curve for the color, am i right?

anyway good, i like that tone

Right, I reduced contrast around the edges and tweaked curves for color.

http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/6295/curvesb.jpg

Note that I changed the face very little ...

http://img834.imageshack.us/img834/9688/faceib.jpg

Jan 02 12 04:19 pm Link

Photographer

Daniele Burza

Posts: 18

Milan, Lombardy, Italy

thank you for everything man, thanks for the hints!

Jan 02 12 04:22 pm Link

Photographer

Laura Kate Photography

Posts: 241

Sioux Falls, South Dakota, US

If this is anything like what you're after I could tell you how I did it.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110907/20/4e6837cfb42bb_m.jpg


I'll still trying experimenting myself as I want to try some more 'painterly' portraits in the future

Jan 02 12 09:42 pm Link

Photographer

Marcus Turner Photo

Posts: 201

Chicago, Illinois, US

Laura Kate Photography wrote:
If this is anything like what you're after I could tell you how I did it.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110907/20/4e6837cfb42bb_m.jpg


I'll still trying experimenting myself as I want to try some more 'painterly' portraits in the future

I consider that a painting like portrait.  I was trying to achieve an effect like this in a photo.  i would like to know

Jan 03 12 06:50 am Link

Photographer

Laura Kate Photography

Posts: 241

Sioux Falls, South Dakota, US

Marcus Turner Photo wrote:

I consider that a painting like portrait.  I was trying to achieve an effect like this in a photo.  i would like to know

Hey Marcus. Here are the directions for my process as well as I can remember. *Also please forgive typos and grammatical errors, its been a long day lol.

*I uploaded the layered tiff file onto Media fire. http://www.mediafire.com/i/?psab6ia1a1un9oo
Hopefully it works! Let me know if it doesn't*


1) cropped and made some global adjustments in lightroom such as exposure, fill light, white balance.


2) This part was the most time consuming and unfortunately I did merge the two layers when I saved the file.
- I did a highpass/gaussian blur split. I found I prefered to look at one layer at a time for this.  By which I mean I looked at the layer holding the blurred color and the layer looking at the highpass by themselves.
-On the color layer I removed her tattoo (which I now see actually still has some color problems I need to fix) removed blemishes etc and used the heal and clone to to make her skin tone consistent throughout.
- On the highpass layer I used primarily the clone tool to make the skin all the same texture. I sample a part of skin which still had a small amount of texture put was still pretty smooth and I cloned all other portions of the skin to match this but I left the edges of the highpass layer....hard ...I guess you could say :? ie I didn't make any adjustment to the outline of her face and features and I didn't remove texture entirely I just made it all more even and only have the minimum amount of actual skin texture.


*You can see skin tone and blemishes on the bottom layer, the next layer up is after everything is fixed and smoothed but not blurred. * I also made the sheet drapped around her a little cleaner looking and removed the tips of a few fingers you can see in the original.

3) The braid didn't turn out as well as hoped since her hair was very finer than I expected so I took a thick chunk of it, made a copy on a new layer and played with it until it looked reasonable and more like the picture in my head.

4) I added a "dodge and burn" layer - really a contouring layer enhance the eyes and jawline just a tad

5) I added a texture layer to create a bit of worn feel to it and to have a canvasy type texture to the background. I believe it was a stock image of vintage paper I found on deviantart.com

6) all the other layers labeled 'levels' 'gradient map' 'green shadow' 'hue/sat'   just came about as I played with colors and tried to figure out how the texture colors would interact with the picture colors. I mainly played with the red and blue levels and output setting to get color cast in the shadows and highlights.

7) On the final layer I copied and merged all previous layers and used "Correct Camera Distortion" under the Filter tab to add a vignette. Also I chose "Angled Strokes" under "Brush strokes" in the Filter tab and adjust the setting to be small and angle along the same direction as the face.


and I think thats about it...O I also light the shot with a socked beautydish located approximately 45degrees camera right.


Sorry if any of that was unclear!

Jan 03 12 08:11 pm Link

Photographer

Jeff Hopkins

Posts: 251

Cincinnati, Ohio, US

try photomatix tone mapping for painterly etffec

Jan 03 12 08:22 pm Link

Photographer

Diogo de Sousa

Posts: 2

Colchester, England, United Kingdom

Hi. Did u guys saw the work of Joanna Kustra. I love jaime ibarra work and i kinda know how he gives that effect to his photos but Joanna is absolutely amazing.

Apr 09 12 06:40 pm Link

Photographer

- H T -

Posts: 1043

New York, New York, US

Daniele Burza wrote:
Peano but it seems (for me) that in the examples, the subjects are a bit more "plastic" (see the faces), but just a bit

1) You should ask Corwin and see if you can absorb his knowledge.

2) if you are talking about the skin like that, use the Clarity slider in LR and move it to the left until it's smoother yet not too blurry.  Once you retouch the blemishes, add contrast, and re-sharpen a bit(try using selective sharpening too..like channel masking), you should get close.   

3) Using Portraiture and tweaking the settings and selectively bringing out the blurred skin using masks can work too

Apr 09 12 06:57 pm Link

Photographer

Sausage69

Posts: 101

Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

I'm very interested in the highpass and gaussian technique. How is it done? Do you duplicate the image into 2 layers?  And then use a highpass filter on one (that turns the image grey)? What are their blending modes?

I also am interested in knowing how to clone large areas of skin from a small one. I just cannot seem to get the cloned areas to be seamless... it all ends up looking like a huge patchwork of skin from different sources.

Laura Kate Photography wrote:
- I did a highpass/gaussian blur split. I found I prefered to look at one layer at a time for this.  By which I mean I looked at the layer holding the blurred color and the layer looking at the highpass by themselves.
-On the color layer I removed her tattoo (which I now see actually still has some color problems I need to fix) removed blemishes etc and used the heal and clone to to make her skin tone consistent throughout.
- On the highpass layer I used primarily the clone tool to make the skin all the same texture. I sample a part of skin which still had a small amount of texture put was still pretty smooth and I cloned all other portions of the skin to match this but I left the edges of the highpass layer....hard ...I guess you could say :? ie I didn't make any adjustment to the outline of her face and features and I didn't remove texture entirely I just made it all more even and only have the minimum amount of actual skin texture.

Jun 02 12 06:46 am Link

Digital Artist

Koray

Posts: 6709

Ankara, Ankara, Turkey

Diogo de Sousa wrote:
Hi. Did u guys saw the work of Joanna Kustra. I love jaime ibarra work and i kinda know how he gives that effect to his photos but Joanna is absolutely amazing.

thanks for the name...great stuff smile

Jun 02 12 08:32 am Link

Photographer

Sausage69

Posts: 101

Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Hello! The mediafire link has expired. Could you repost this somewhere? Thank you!

Marcus Turner Photo wrote:

I consider that a painting like portrait.  I was trying to achieve an effect like this in a photo.  i would like to know

Jan 27 13 05:04 am Link

Photographer

zssphotography

Posts: 56

UPPER DARBY, Pennsylvania, US

you can get a great painterly effect using HDR if you ever tried that, like so

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130121/17/50fde83e47bda_m.jpg

Jan 28 13 06:18 pm Link

Photographer

Ren Murray

Posts: 542

Salem, Oregon, US

When I think of "painterly", I look at it maybe a bit more literally. My cheesecake pinups are heavily influenced by Elvgren paintings, so I intentionally go after what some call a cartoonish look.

The way I get the look I am after is really just a bunch of d&b. Here's one that isn't a cheesecake pinup, but that definitely got a bit of that treatment.

18+ http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/11 … 700fc7.jpg

Jan 29 13 08:02 pm Link

Photographer

Sausage69

Posts: 101

Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Laura Kate Photography wrote:
If this is anything like what you're after I could tell you how I did it.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110907/20/4e6837cfb42bb_m.jpg


I'll still trying experimenting myself as I want to try some more 'painterly' portraits in the future

Could someone repost this file? Would love to take a look.

May 25 13 06:16 am Link

Photographer

Sausage69

Posts: 101

Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

These are paintings, but I really like the colors.

http://wonderthinkanswer.tumblr.com/pos … s-by-serge

Does anyone know how to make your photos have this sort of color? What kind of gradient mapping is needed?

Jul 05 13 07:02 am Link

Retoucher

Joann Empson

Posts: 430

Walnut Creek, California, US

You can get a decent painting effect using GIMP G'MIC, but it's more pastel than oil:

1. Use the GIMP G'MIC Kuwahara and Lylejk filters on two duplicate layers.
2. Put both duplicate layers over the original image in Value mode at 32% opacity.
3. Smooth and adjust the colors.

This is what I get.

http://i.imgur.com/G965JFl.jpg

Jul 05 13 12:08 pm Link

Retoucher

Joann Empson

Posts: 430

Walnut Creek, California, US

A little extra smoothing of Sausage69's photo using the Anisotropic Smoothing filter in GIMP G'MIC (with the settings shown below) turned it pretty close to an oil painting.

http://i.imgur.com/xE6xgCV.png

http://i.imgur.com/BoLvX7H.jpg

Adding another duplicate layer on top, running it through the GIMP G'MIC Photoillustration filter, and putting it in Multiply mode at 64% opacity makes this.

http://i.imgur.com/pr7rb2D.jpg

Here's the original for comparison:

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110907/20/4e6837cfb42bb.jpg

Jul 05 13 12:46 pm Link

Photographer

felix martin

Posts: 27

Portland, Oregon, US

Take Jaime's class or buy his video. Worth every cent...

Jul 05 13 01:03 pm Link

Photographer

Motordrive Photography

Posts: 3566

Lodi, California, US

felix martin wrote:
Take Jaime's class or buy his video. Worth every cent...

Jaime ?
link?

Jul 05 13 01:34 pm Link

Photographer

felix martin

Posts: 27

Portland, Oregon, US

Jul 05 13 01:52 pm Link

Photographer

Motordrive Photography

Posts: 3566

Lodi, California, US

thank you, checking now

Jul 05 13 01:58 pm Link

Retoucher

Joann Empson

Posts: 430

Walnut Creek, California, US

Here's my attempt at making Jaime Ibarra's photo look more like a painting, using basically the same technique I used on Sausage69's photo above.
http://i.imgur.com/Cc6MsX6.jpg

Here's the original:
http://i.imgur.com/KyO5xfZ.jpg

Jul 05 13 02:27 pm Link

Photographer

Camerosity

Posts: 5334

Saint Louis, Missouri, US

There are a number of techniques that I think are often found in “painterly” photos. However, I don’t know whether there is an exact “recipe” for painterly photos. I’ve also seen photos that I’d put in that category that do the exact opposite of some of these techniques. Having a “painter’s eye” no doubt would be helpful.

This photo includes several of them. Soft lighting. Soft backgrounds. Using light to emphasize what you want to emphasize and de-emphasize what you don’t. Selective placement of texture and detail. Muted colors. Using complimentary and split complimentary colors, related colors, triads and tetrads for your color pallet.

Muted blues and golds are a classic combination. Actually in the digital world, blue and yellow are opposites. In the painter’s world, blue and orange are complimentary colors. (You can get a color wheel that will tell you everything you need to know about color theory for about $7.)

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110731/18/4e36052bdad4d.jpg

Green and red are complimentary colors. You rarely see primary colors or bright colors in painterly photos. These are muted variations of green and red. This photo also is low in contrast – and D&B is used to carve and emphasize shape and form. Also note the abstract background of related colors. You rarely see solid color backgrounds in these photos.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110703/12/4e10c9114f41c.jpg

There’s a class of painted fabric backgrounds called Rembrandt or Old Masters backgrounds. These painted backgrounds usually look something like out-of-focus clouds and generally include variations of the same muted colors, often with related colors mixed in. I couldn’t find an example of one of these backgrounds on MM.

The Old Masters backgrounds of 40-50 years ago were more subtle and superior to those of today, imo. Almost every portrait studio used them to add a painterly touch.

http://www.backgroundsbymaheu.com/rembrandt.html

http://www.dennymfg.com/Products.aspx?S … b6ab04dd88

http://savageuniversal.com/products/can … s-backdrop

http://www.backdropoutlet.com/OLD-MASTER/products/1009/

Low contrast. You’re more likely to see low-key (at least left-of-center on the histogram, maybe not true low-key). You’ll rarely see true black, and you’ll almost never see true white.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110930/12/4e8613dad4fcf.jpg

Soft-focus or out-of-focus backgrounds – and even “abstract” backgrounds.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/120727/02/5012588f8c8f4.jpg

Backgrounds of related colors (essentially adjacent to each other on the color wheel). Backgrounds that appear to be made of brush strokes.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110703/12/4e10c9114f41c.jpg

Here’s a folder of photos that I consider (or considered at one time) to be painterly. The may be a few in there that I wouldn’t put in the folder today – maybe close, but not as close as others.

http://www.modelmayhem.com/list/518804

This may be the “most painterly” photo in the list.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110318/08/4d83760122bc2.jpg

What do they have in common?

Jul 05 13 02:55 pm Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Jul 05 13 03:11 pm Link

Photographer

Chuckarelei

Posts: 9626

Seattle, Washington, US

Peano wrote:
Check the work of Scott Deardorff . . .

Before:
http://www.pbase.com/calford/image/58617347/original

After:
http://www.pbase.com/sdfp/image/58931715/original


Also Fred James:
http://www.fredjames.com/c.aspx?n=Artwork

Excellent links.

Jul 05 13 03:49 pm Link