Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > Simple way to get this effect?

Photographer

Bethany Souza

Posts: 1464

Pensacola, Florida, US

http://images1.chictopia.com/photos/mniewielka/9428798348/black-boots-periwinkle-dress_400.jpg
I'm pretty photoshop illiterate, so if somebody can dumb it down for me that would be awesome!

Jun 30 12 10:02 pm Link

Photographer

AJ_In_Atlanta

Posts: 12835

Atlanta, Georgia, US

Err what exactly are you wanting to know about the image?

Jun 30 12 10:05 pm Link

Photographer

Bethany Souza

Posts: 1464

Pensacola, Florida, US

How to get the coloring effect. The dull blacks and the color filter.

Jun 30 12 10:07 pm Link

Photographer

AJ_In_Atlanta

Posts: 12835

Atlanta, Georgia, US

Cliping the blacks with an curves adjust layer may get you close, or using the exposure control adjustment layer

Jun 30 12 10:09 pm Link

Photographer

Bethany Souza

Posts: 1464

Pensacola, Florida, US

And then just using photo filter?

Jun 30 12 10:10 pm Link

Photographer

Bethany Souza

Posts: 1464

Pensacola, Florida, US

and this?
http://www.firebirdphoto.com/images/cloth.jpg

Jun 30 12 10:11 pm Link

Photographer

STL-After-Dark

Posts: 4383

Saint Louis, Missouri, US

That effect is produced by letting a Polaroid lay around on the coffee table of a chain smoker for five years then scanning too digital with a cheap scanner bought from the clearance aisle at WalMart hmm

Jun 30 12 10:15 pm Link

Photographer

Bethany Souza

Posts: 1464

Pensacola, Florida, US

Why bother with a useless reply?

Jun 30 12 10:18 pm Link

Photographer

STL-After-Dark

Posts: 4383

Saint Louis, Missouri, US

Bethany Souza wrote:
Why bother with a useless reply?

On issues of color -

It's basically like someone with a full set of paints and paint brushes asking how to make a particular shade of red ... "experiment" is the only real answer that any of us can give you without actually doing it for you.

Jun 30 12 10:22 pm Link

Photographer

Brian T Rickey

Posts: 4008

Saint Louis, Missouri, US

I am sure there are many different ways to achieve the 1st picture you posted.  Personally I would use ASE4 but any version could probably do it.  I have no doubt Peano will be here soon with an exact formula!   borat

Jun 30 12 10:24 pm Link

Photographer

Carl Blum Photography

Posts: 544

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

I would use Lightroom coloring adjustments...
They are useful for making colors POP
and for desaturating them

Jul 01 12 08:27 am Link

Jul 01 12 08:51 am Link

Photographer

Don Garrett

Posts: 4451

Escondido, California, US

The second image looks like some kind of tonemapping software was used. I see some faint halos around the trees on the left, and some small, sharp halos around the trees on the right. I also feel that the person let the color balance, and the saturation get "out of control". Although I like the shadows to look like shadows, and the highlights look like highlights, (with more detail in both), I feel that the maker of the second one did NOT control all of these elements.
  Using three conversions from the RAW, one with the exposure slider left in the middle, (default), and two with the exposure sliders on the opposite extremes, ("over", and "under" exposed), will allow you to use the software, Photomatix, and tone map the three conversions. I also use the three conversions in Photoshop to distribute the tones the way I want to see them. Curves adjustments made to the blended images can get the contrast where you want it, and "stretch" the tones to the edges of the histogram. I blend the tonemapped image(s) with the Photoshopped one(s) to get a more "natural" look. If you want an "over-the-top" look, with lots of saturation, and local contrast, like the second image in your thread, you just have to control the image to look like that. If you want a more "natural" look, but with more shadow detail, and more body and detail in the highlights, that can also be done.
  I use the "original", unprocessed TIFF conversion to guide me to a somewhat more photographic looking distribution of the tones, but get more shadow detail, and more highlight detail than I can with "conventional" techniques, using the other two conversions. I also use the shadow/highlight feature, in Photoshop, but CAREFULLY, as using that tool can result in the halos I mentioned earlier, along with other "artifacts", which I HATE !
  All the while, you have to control the saturation and color balance, as these aggressive techniques move everything all over the place, if you don't do so.
  I realize this isn't dumbed down a lot, and that the explanation is vague and incomplete, (the exact techniques would take two hours to describe), but you have to experiment with the tools, especially curves, to understand how they work, and how to control them.
My son has been using Light Room to move the tones, and local contrast around easier, with very good results. I have yet to experiment with it, but will still always refer to my histogram, once I get the image into Photoshop, to help me to better see exactly where I have put everything.
  I hope this has helped - you can also control your image to resemble the first one, using the same techniques, by applying them differently.
  My whole point is that you can get pretty much ANY look you want, but you have to "force" the image into that look. Absolute control can be at your fingertips. You decide if/when, your image looks the way you want it to, then stop !
- Don
P.S. I was going to write a book explaining how to implement all of this, and give understanding of the powerful tools used, as it would take a whole book to do that, but I haven't felt motivated, and improvements to Photoshop, and Light Room will probably make such a book obsolete after I finish it anyway. My advice is to just have fun, and BE PATIENT ! (I have been using Photoshop for over 15 years, and consider myself to still be a student).

Jul 01 12 09:54 am Link

Photographer

Velvet Paper Photo

Posts: 468

Lexington, Kentucky, US

Jul 02 12 12:54 pm Link

Photographer

Alexander Whyte

Posts: 17

Forfar, Scotland, United Kingdom

I think both images look awful so not worth trying to find out how they mucked them up.

Just do your own style images, cant be any worse than those there.

Jul 11 12 02:08 pm Link

Photographer

Valent Lau

Posts: 130

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

I see some photographers whose whole styles are something like these. I sometimes wonder after looking at the tutorials whether they really do that with every single image. I mean the work to do with 1 image seems so much I've never bothered trying as I know I'm not going to have just 1-2 pics in a set with some weird effect. Even when I try filters I tend to prefer the natural look. Maybe I'm naive cuz a lot of people seem to want to pay for their whole wedding to look like this...

Jul 13 12 03:45 am Link

Photographer

CN STUDIO

Posts: 99

WEST BLOOMFIELD, Michigan, US

A lot of people seem to love these instagram type effects. The second one with the bright colors, to me it looks like the sky and the clothes were enhanced by making the colors more vibrant. There could be more to it I don't know but that's my best guess.

Jul 13 12 07:04 am Link

Retoucher

new retouching

Posts: 54

Predeal, Braşov, Romania

I can only guess one possible way...

I assume the green from the picture did not look like that.
Duplicate the background, choose Replace Color and select all the green from the picture.
In the same window , select Hue and drag it to the left until you find the right color, something toward brown and vintage feel of green.
And maybe it is done the same way with the other colors, I can not tell.
I am pretty sure about a vintage green because I've done it recently.

About cross processing, I personally do not like it, all pictures look the same and it is invasive and destructive to the picture. But it is a personal taste.

Jul 13 12 12:14 pm Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Well, Bethany, you ain't gettin' a whole lotta help here.

- You ask how to get an effect, and you get someone's personal opinion about how the effect stinks. No help there.

- Another tells you that "experiment" is the only possible way to get the colors in your second example. No help there.

- You ask for a simple way to get the effect and you get a condensed doctoral dissertation. Not much help there.

And so it goes ...

*** end of rant ***

For the altered blue sky in your second example, open a selective color adjustment layer. In the Cyans and Blues, experiment especially with the amount of cyan and magenta in those colors. Increase cyan and decrease magenta (= increase green) in each of those panels. Most important, eyeball that target image and try to see the constituent colors.

In the target image, as compared with a "normal" blue sky, can you see the higher levels of cyan and green in the target image? Seeing that is two-thirds of the job.

http://img577.imageshack.us/img577/5571/skyl.jpg

Jul 13 12 04:24 pm Link