Forums > Model Colloquy > A free introductory modeling guide.

Photographer

T R Willmitch

Posts: 7172

Normal, Illinois, US

Awhile back it was suggested that I prepare a checklist for models preparing to shoot with me. The list would include items to bring to nearly any photo session and answer questions about issues like my model release.

I feel that it’s important to discuss these things individually the model each time I work with someone new.  So I never compiled that checklist.  Still, I feel that a simple guide would be helpful for many new models.  Not a book dealing with the business end of the industry, but something containing helpful tips when preparing for a shoot.  Also, it’s good to know what resources are available regarding everything from basic posing techniques to how the industry works.

From this idea sprang my introductory guide to modeling.  It’s meant to give a simple overview of modeling and put a few resources at your fingertips.  The guide also includes a list of items to bring to a shoot and helpful modeling tips.

The guide can be downloaded free from my Model Mayhem profile page, located here:

http://www.modelmayhem.com/37534

Just click on the book icon, toward the bottom of my profile.

The guide is in Adobe Acrobat  (.pdf) format and can be viewed using Adobe’s free reader.  It is available here:

http://get.adobe.com/reader/

with a link also found on my page.

If you already have Adobe Acrobat  installed then your browser will probably open my guide when you click the book icon.  You can then save the file to your hard drive. 

Otherwise, PC users can right-click on the icon.  Then select “Save Target As…” or “Save Link As…” and save the file. The guide should also be readable on a Nook or Kindle.

This booklet is for your personal use only.  Please don’t distribute it.  Also, I would greatly appreciate constructive feedback.  I’ve already received some great ideas for expanding and improving the booklet in a future edition. 

Naturally, you're welcome to leave nice comments on my profile page.  However, my goal is to make this simple introductory guide to modeling useful to new models and provides helpful tips for even seasoned pros. Together we can make this guide a great resource for everyone.

I hope that you enjoy the guide!

~ Tom Willmitch

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i164/trwillm/Model%20Mayhem/Kitten.gif

Oct 10 12 08:37 pm Link

Model

Laura UnBound

Posts: 27371

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Your insight on releases and who owns copyright is....debatable.

Oct 10 12 08:46 pm Link

Photographer

Bold Sheep Photography

Posts: 234

Blacksburg, Virginia, US

Laura UnBound wrote:
Your insight on releases and who owns copyright is....debatable.

+1

Oct 10 12 08:53 pm Link

Photographer

S W I N S K E Y

Posts: 24315

Saint Petersburg, Florida, US

Laura UnBound wrote:
Your insight on releases and who owns copyright is....debatable.

it was accurate for canada....

http://i.imgur.com/m8TQi.png

Oct 10 12 08:56 pm Link

Photographer

InnerGlow Studios

Posts: 1708

Washington, District of Columbia, US

Ms Jaime-BoldSheepPhoto wrote:

Laura UnBound wrote:
Your insight on releases and who owns copyright is....debatable.

+1

+2

Your statement that "The images and associated copyrights from a photo session belong to the person paying for the session, unless agreed otherwise in writing" with regard to US Copyright law is just plain wrong.

Oct 10 12 09:01 pm Link

Photographer

Rich Burroughs

Posts: 3259

Portland, Oregon, US

Yeah you need to fix the copyright stuff. You seem to mean well but you're spreading misinformation. Models are going to be quoting that stuff to photographers who will be wondering who told them that.

And your audience is international, as someone alluded to. You can't make definitive statements about things which differ depending where you are.

Oct 10 12 09:07 pm Link

Model

Laura UnBound

Posts: 27371

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

S W I N S K E Y wrote:

it was accurate for canada....

Unfortunately he's in Illinois. Wonder if he books a lot of Canadians

Oct 10 12 09:14 pm Link

Photographer

Jerry Nemeth

Posts: 27924

Dearborn, Michigan, US

Laura UnBound wrote:

Unfortunately he's in Illinois. Wonder if he books a lot of Canadians

I will be shooting a model from Ottawa in November.

Oct 10 12 09:16 pm Link

Model

Laura UnBound

Posts: 27371

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

You also completely left out the entire genre and sub-genres of nude modelling, alt modelling, fitness, etc etc.

The genres you did touch on are great....for girls who actually fit those categories. SO many Internet models (the ones reading your guide), don't fit.

Oct 10 12 09:17 pm Link

Photographer

Designit - Edward Olson

Posts: 1636

Eureka, California, US

T R Willmitch wrote:
A free introductory modeling guide.

And worth every cent.

Oct 10 12 10:35 pm Link

Photographer

Seville Media

Posts: 69

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US

Copyright is owned by the creator, which is the photographer, unless it's work for hire OR if you give away the copyright/assign it to the third party. Once again, this is the case at least in the U.S.

Overall, pretty good piece of reading. Congrats on getting it done.

Oct 10 12 11:21 pm Link

Model

_Rei_

Posts: 124

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia

Since you're looking for feedback, I thought I'd download your booklet and have a read (I'm not a new model, but hey, we never stop learning, right?)

I thought it covered some basics well - I would've found the pre-shoot preparation and 'what to bring' sections especially helpful as a newbie. The basic kit that I carry is pretty similar to what you describe, even though we work in different genres.

Some things I noticed that might need altering:
* Artistic nude is not one of the genres you mention in your opening pages, yet you make a refer to it on page 5 when talking about a model's limits. If you're not going to describe the genre elsewhere, it might be confusing to bring it up at that point with no other reference.
* Your 'what to bring' section specifies both 'black high heels' and 'black pumps' - a pump is a high-heel with a closed toe, so do you mean that the model should bring closed-toe heels, and also a different style heel in the same colour? As written, this isn't clear.
* Your posing description are detailed, and while I know exactly what you mean, it might help a new model to have more pictures in this section. Especially when talking about how far a model should turn in profile, or working with light.

The overall tone is friendly and approachable, which I think is appealing. It's also good that you link to the newmodels website, to answer more complicated (yet common) questions beginner have about the industry.

Hope this helps!

Oct 11 12 02:04 am Link

Photographer

T R Willmitch

Posts: 7172

Normal, Illinois, US

InnerGlow Studios wrote:

Ms Jaime-BoldSheepPhoto wrote:

Laura UnBound wrote:
Your insight on releases and who owns copyright is....debatable.

+1

Your statement that "The images and associated copyrights from a photo session belong to the person paying for the session, unless agreed otherwise in writing" with regard to US Copyright law is just plain wrong.

I believe that my statement is long established in case law, in the U.S.  The pivotal case is White Studio Inc. vs Dreyfoos, 156 App. Div 762 (N.Y.) (1913), where the court wrote:

It is settled law that the ordinary contract between a photographer and his customer is a contract of employment.  The conception as well as the production of the photography is work done for the customers, and they, not their employee, are the exclusive owners of all proprietary rights.

This is further supported by Lumiere vs Robertson-Cole Distributing Corp., 280 Fed 550 (2d Cir.), cert. den. 259 U.S. 583 (1922).

However, this is not exactly the stuff one would include in a simple guide to anything.  I am considering end notes in a future edition.

Still, I will look into this more deeply.  Also, I believe that I need to emphasize that we are talking about photo sessions where the model pays for the images and not pictures shot for trade.

Oct 11 12 06:58 am Link

Photographer

T R Willmitch

Posts: 7172

Normal, Illinois, US

Laura UnBound wrote:
You also completely left out the entire genre and sub-genres of nude modelling, alt modelling, fitness, etc etc.

The genres you did touch on are great....for girls who actually fit those categories. SO many Internet models (the ones reading your guide), don't fit.

You're right.  This is an issue that I'll have to address in the next edition.

Oct 11 12 07:02 am Link

Photographer

T R Willmitch

Posts: 7172

Normal, Illinois, US

_Rei_ wrote:
Since you're looking for feedback, I thought I'd download your booklet and have a read (I'm not a new model, but hey, we never stop learning, right?)

I thought it covered some basics well - I would've found the pre-shoot preparation and 'what to bring' sections especially helpful as a newbie. The basic kit that I carry is pretty similar to what you describe, even though we work in different genres.

Some things I noticed that might need altering:
* Artistic nude is not one of the genres you mention in your opening pages, yet you make a refer to it on page 5 when talking about a model's limits. If you're not going to describe the genre elsewhere, it might be confusing to bring it up at that point with no other reference.
* Your 'what to bring' section specifies both 'black high heels' and 'black pumps' - a pump is a high-heel with a closed toe, so do you mean that the model should bring closed-toe heels, and also a different style heel in the same colour? As written, this isn't clear.
* Your posing description are detailed, and while I know exactly what you mean, it might help a new model to have more pictures in this section. Especially when talking about how far a model should turn in profile, or working with light.

The overall tone is friendly and approachable, which I think is appealing. It's also good that you link to the newmodels website, to answer more complicated (yet common) questions beginner have about the industry.

Hope this helps!

Thanks!  Your insights and suggestions are appreciated.

Oct 11 12 07:07 am Link

Photographer

joeyk

Posts: 14730

Seminole, Florida, US

Try the federal Copyright Act of 1976, I think you'll find it overrides your 100 year old references...

Oct 11 12 07:12 am Link

Photographer

Bold Sheep Photography

Posts: 234

Blacksburg, Virginia, US

"Prior to 1978, court cases said a customer who commissioned a photo was the employer of the photographer, so customers could get reprints made without any problem. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court said that was no longer true. To be an employee, the court said a person would have to be considered an employee under the traditional tests such as are used to impose payroll taxes, social security, and similar laws. That is not the usual customer-photographer relationship."

Oct 11 12 08:05 am Link

guide forum

Photographer

GPS Studio Services

Posts: 36236

San Francisco, California, US

I think people are beating the issue to death.  I believe we have established that the OP is mis-informed on the copyright issue.  I'd be interested in hearing more thoughts on the rest of the primer.

Oct 11 12 08:13 am Link

Photographer

VisiFoto

Posts: 501

Knoxville, Tennessee, US

Ms Jaime-BoldSheepPhoto wrote:
"Prior to 1978, court cases said a customer who commissioned a photo was the employer of the photographer, so customers could get reprints made without any problem. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court said that was no longer true. To be an employee, the court said a person would have to be considered an employee under the traditional tests such as are used to impose payroll taxes, social security, and similar laws. That is not the usual customer-photographer relationship."

The source, including a sample copyright contract:

Copyright Guidelines

The Board of Directors of the American Society of Media Photographers, the Professional Photographers of America, Photo Marketing Association International, the Association of Professional Color Imagers, the Professional School Photographers Association International and the Coalition for Consumers' Picture Rights, adopt the following guidelines concerning copyright practice for members of the photo industry.

Who Owns What?

The law says the "author" is the owner of the copyright. The author of a photo or image is usually the person who snapped the shutter or created the image. If you took the photo, you own the copyright. If a professional photographer took the photo for you, then he or she owns the copyright. If that photographer is an employee of a studio or other person in the business of making photos, then his or her employer is considered the author.

Prior to 1978, court cases said a customer who commissioned a photo was the employer of the photographer, so customers could get reprints made without any problem. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court said that was no longer true. To be an employee, the court said a person would have to be considered an employee under the traditional tests such as are used to impose payroll taxes, social security, and similar laws. That is not the usual customer-photographer relationship.

Are There Any Exceptions?

Generally no. In some unique circumstances, we may be able to consider special requests. We will gather the information, investigate to the extent necessary to see if permission can be obtained, and make a decision based on our best judgment of how the law applies. Please understand if we tell you we cannot make the copies. It is our legal obligation to protect the photographers to the extent possible, and to keep you and ourselves from incurring liability.

All members of the Photo Industry should:

Recognize the photographer or studio as the owner of the copyright in his or her photographs in most circumstances, particularly in the case of professional portraits.

Provide reasonable notice to customers that the permission of the photographer is necessary under federal copyright law in most circumstances for copying or other manipulation of a photograph.

Support and work together to obtain amendment of the Copyright Act to eliminate copyright registration as a precondition for statutory damages and attorneys' fees in cases involving photographs, provided however, that the amendments also bar any award of statutory damages or attorneys' fees for innocent infringement. The parties will work together and with Congress to make clear the meaning of "innocent infringement."

In addition, photographers should:

Prior to completion of the sales process, provide notice to customers of the photographer's ownership of copyright, in an effort to avoid confusion about the rights of the photographer.

In addition, photo processors should:

Notify customers that the photo processor does not copy or manipulate photos bearing a copyright notice without the permission of the copyright owner names in the notice.

Inspect the front and back of an unmarked image submitted for copying to determine if it is reasonably recognizable as a professional photograph.

APPEARANCE OF PROFESSIONAL PHOTOS

It is often difficult to determine whether a photo was taken by a professional. When a copy is requested, the overall appearance must be considered. The following are some factors to consider in concluding whether a photo is a professional photo:

Formal poses characteristic of a sitting.

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consumer … ight.shtml

This is why stores refuse to make copies of photos, even when the photographer wants copies of his/her own copyrighted photos.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … -GOOD.html

1st SCOTUS case on photography copyright was Burrow-Giles Lithographic Co. v. Sarony, 111 U.S. 53 (1884).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burrow-Gil … _v._Sarony

SCOTUS has a case pending in 2012 to ban owners of photographs from reselling them.
http://articles.marketwatch.com/2012-10 … wiley-sons

Oct 11 12 10:41 am Link

Photographer

T R Willmitch

Posts: 7172

Normal, Illinois, US

VisiFoto wrote:
Copyright Guidelines

The Board of Directors of the American Society of Media Photographers, the Professional Photographers of America, Photo Marketing Association International, the Association of Professional Color Imagers, the Professional School Photographers Association International and the Coalition for Consumers' Picture Rights, adopt the following guidelines concerning copyright practice for members of the photo industry.

Who Owns What?

The law says the "author" is the owner of the copyright. The author of a photo or image is usually the person who snapped the shutter or created the image. If you took the photo, you own the copyright. If a professional photographer took the photo for you, then he or she owns the copyright. If that photographer is an employee of a studio or other person in the business of making photos, then his or her employer is considered the author.

Prior to 1978, court cases said a customer who commissioned a photo was the employer of the photographer, so customers could get reprints made without any problem. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court said that was no longer true. To be an employee, the court said a person would have to be considered an employee under the traditional tests such as are used to impose payroll taxes, social security, and similar laws. That is not the usual customer-photographer relationship.

...

1st SCOTUS case on photography copyright was Burrow-Giles Lithographic Co. v. Sarony, 111 U.S. 53 (1884).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burrow-Gil … _v._Sarony

SCOTUS has a case pending in 2012 to ban owners of photographs from reselling them.
http://articles.marketwatch.com/2012-10 … wiley-sons

Thank you everyone, particularly VisiFoto, for clearing up this issue.  I'll do a little additional research based on several up-to-date photography and the law books that I own.  Then I'll revise my guide, updating the booklet as soon as possible.

My primary concern is to create an accurate and useful guide for anyone new to modeling.  I appreciate everyone's input in this process.


http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i164/trwillm/Model%20Mayhem/Kitten.gif

Oct 11 12 10:50 am Link

Photographer

Rebel Photo

Posts: 11446

Florence, South Carolina, US

ID requirements in the beginning are completely misleading! 2257...? applies not to sexual, but Sexually Explicit. There is a difference!

here is a perfect example of where it is NOT needed, yet the image is very sexual: http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/120731/19/50188f215f41b_m.jpg

Oct 11 12 10:56 am Link

Photographer

VisiFoto

Posts: 501

Knoxville, Tennessee, US

That's a very good guide for new models. No single source is 100% accurate as a silver bullet with 100% of what they need to know.

United States Copyright Office

My local copying store will not make reproductions of old family photographs. What can I do?

Photocopying shops, photography stores and other photo developing stores are often reluctant to make reproductions of old photographs for fear of violating the copyright law and being sued. These fears are not unreasonable, because copy shops have been sued for reproducing copyrighted works and have been required to pay substantial damages for infringing copyrighted works. The policy established by a shop is a business decision and risk assessment that the business is entitled to make, because the business may face liability if they reproduce a work even if they did not know the work was copyrighted.

In the case of photographs, it is sometimes difficult to determine who owns the copyright and there may be little or no information about the owner on individual copies. Ownership of a “copy” of a photograph – the tangible embodiment of the “work” – is distinct from the “work” itself – the intangible intellectual property. The owner of the “work” is generally the photographer or, in certain situations, the employer of the photographer. Even if a person hires a photographer to take pictures of a wedding, for example, the photographer will own the copyright in the photographs unless the copyright in the photographs is transferred, in writing and signed by the copyright owner, to another person. The subject of the photograph generally has nothing to do with the ownership of the copyright in the photograph. If the photographer is no longer living, the rights in the photograph are determined by the photographer’s will or passed as personal property by the applicable laws of intestate succession.

http://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-fairuse.html

Here's a long list of legal cites:

Who owns the copyright?

The person who presses the shutter-release automatically owns the copyright to the photograph.

“Copyright … vests initially in the author …”
— 17 USC §201(a)

The one exception is when the the photographer is a full-time employee, then the employer owns the copyright as a “work made for hire.”

“In the case of a work made for hire, the employer … is considered the author …”
— 17 USC §201(b)

This does not apply to part-time, volunteer, or contract (e.g. wedding) photographers. A photographer owns the copyright unless they explicitly sign it away in writing.

“A transfer of copyright ownership, other than by operation of law, is not valid unless an instrument of conveyance … is in writing and signed by the owner …”
— 17 USC §204(a)

Models (and other people in a photo) do not own copyright; they own their likeness, as publicity rights. Likewise, property owners have property rights.

Model

If you are a person in a photograph, the photographer (not you) owns the copyright, unless agreed otherwise in writing.

As a photographer, you get to be the only person to:

1.make and sell copies of your photos;
2.create other art using your photos, such as paintings or Photoshop variations;
3.publish your photos on the Internet and in books;
4.license usage of your photos to other people in exchange for money.

What about that © symbol?

The © symbol, or any other marking, is not required. It was necessary in the U.S. before 1989, but adoption of the Berne Convention removed this requirement, as copyright is now automatic. However, a copyright notice is still optionally used as means of identifying the copyright owner, along with the date of creation. You don’t have to include the © with your photo, but the addition of “© 2006 Joe Bloggs” tells everyone that Joe Bloggs hereby declares copyright ownership of this photo since 2006.

Why should I register copyright?

Registration is required to be able to file a lawsuit. If you registered your work before an infringement (or within three months of first publication), then you can sue for statutory damages of up to $30,000 (or $150,000 for willful infringement) PLUS attorney’s fees. Otherwise you will still have to register it before commencing a suit, but you can only get actual damages and no attorney’s fees, which makes a lawsuit uneconomical.

“…no civil action for infringement of the copyright in any United States work shall be instituted until preregistration or registration of the copyright claim has been made in accordance with this title.”
— 17 USC §411(a)

“You will have to register, however, if you wish to bring a lawsuit for infringement of a U.S. work.”
— U.S. Copyright Office, FAQ

How do I register copyright?

You can apply online. An unlimited number of photos can be registered as a group for one fee of $35 (as long as they have the same author and registration year). Just put your JPEG digital photos in a single zip file and upload them here.

http://www.photosecrets.com/copyright

Model release contract:
http://www.photosecrets.com/model-release

Oct 11 12 11:00 am Link

guide forum

Photographer

GPS Studio Services

Posts: 36236

San Francisco, California, US

VisiFoto wrote:
Here's a long list of legal cites:

Who owns the copyright?

The person who presses the shutter-release automatically owns the copyright to the photograph.

“Copyright … vests initially in the author …”
— 17 USC §201(a)

The one exception is when the the photographer is a full-time employee, then the employer owns the copyright as a “work made for hire.”

“In the case of a work made for hire, the employer … is considered the author …”
— 17 USC §201(b)

This does not apply to part-time, volunteer, or contract (e.g. wedding) photographers. A photographer owns the copyright unless they explicitly sign it away in writing.

“A transfer of copyright ownership, other than by operation of law, is not valid unless an instrument of conveyance … is in writing and signed by the owner …”
— 17 USC §204(a)

Models (and other people in a photo) do not own copyright; they own their likeness, as publicity rights. Likewise, property owners have property rights.

Model

If you are a person in a photograph, the photographer (not you) owns the copyright, unless agreed otherwise in writing.

As a photographer, you get to be the only person to:

1.make and sell copies of your photos;
2.create other art using your photos, such as paintings or Photoshop variations;
3.publish your photos on the Internet and in books;
4.license usage of your photos to other people in exchange for money.

What about that © symbol?

The © symbol, or any other marking, is not required. It was necessary in the U.S. before 1989, but adoption of the Berne Convention removed this requirement, as copyright is now automatic. However, a copyright notice is still optionally used as means of identifying the copyright owner, along with the date of creation. You don’t have to include the © with your photo, but the addition of “© 2006 Joe Bloggs” tells everyone that Joe Bloggs hereby declares copyright ownership of this photo since 2006.

Why should I register copyright?

Registration is required to be able to file a lawsuit. If you registered your work before an infringement (or within three months of first publication), then you can sue for statutory damages of up to $30,000 (or $150,000 for willful infringement) PLUS attorney’s fees. Otherwise you will still have to register it before commencing a suit, but you can only get actual damages and no attorney’s fees, which makes a lawsuit uneconomical.

“…no civil action for infringement of the copyright in any United States work shall be instituted until preregistration or registration of the copyright claim has been made in accordance with this title.”
— 17 USC §411(a)

“You will have to register, however, if you wish to bring a lawsuit for infringement of a U.S. work.”
— U.S. Copyright Office, FAQ

How do I register copyright?

You can apply online. An unlimited number of photos can be registered as a group for one fee of $35 (as long as they have the same author and registration year). Just put your JPEG digital photos in a single zip file and upload them here.

http://www.photosecrets.com/copyright

Model release contract:
http://www.photosecrets.com/model-release

Sorry, I have real problems with the information coming from the listed website.  I suggest referring to http://copyright.gov, http://photoattorney.com or http://asmp.org.  They are all much better sources.

Oct 11 12 11:16 am Link

Photographer

VisiFoto

Posts: 501

Knoxville, Tennessee, US

ei Total Productions wrote:
Sorry, I have real problems with the information coming from the listed website.  I suggest referring to http://copyright.gov, http://photoattorney.com or http://asmp.org.  They are all much better sources.

Yes, that URL is a secondary source from a photographer, not a primary source from a court or lawyer updated to Oct 2012.

But note that judges change opinions every day, including the SCOTUS.

75% of judges in USA never attended law collage, never got a license to practice law and many cannot even read.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/25/nyreg … ourts.html

"The law of the case" doctrine requires all judges to ignore all 10-million laws in USA, unless a party to the case specifically cites a specific law or court case.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_the_case

80% of opinions by appellate courts are "unpublished opinions" -- which are bogus verdicts based on non-existant laws that can never be cited as "law" by litigants in lower courts. In other words, the appellate court is lying, and bluffing that the "loser" will not appeal, which is due to lack of money in 99% of cases.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unpublished_opinion

So if you or your lawyer fails to cite a relevant case or law, you may not win your case, as if that law does not exist. I've personally won cases against govt lawyers who fail this basic test of the Rules of Evidence.

"Ignorance of the law is no excuse."
-Maxim of Law

Oct 11 12 12:18 pm Link

Photographer

T R Willmitch

Posts: 7172

Normal, Illinois, US

I appreciate the thoughtful way in which folks have approached the question of current U.S. copyright laws, llama releases, and documentation.  I will careful read the sources listed, along with the print references available to me.

These are important issues and I want to accurately explore them in my guide.  Clearly mistakes and misconceptions will affect how llamas and photographers resolve disputes that might arise related to these topics.

At the same time, I remain interested in what experienced llamas have to say about other aspects of the guide.  I'm sure that there are gaps and (hopefully minor) inaccuracies related to some of the topics that I touch upon -- from preparing for a shoot to what items nearly every llama should carry. 

Again, thanks to everyone for their valuable insights and advice!

Oct 11 12 12:37 pm Link

Photographer

VisiFoto

Posts: 501

Knoxville, Tennessee, US

T R Willmitch wrote:
I appreciate the thoughtful way in which folks have approached the question of current U.S. copyright laws, model releases, and documentation.  I will careful read the sources listed, along with the print references available to me.

These are important issues and I want to accurately explore them in my guide.  Clearly mistakes and misconceptions will affect how models and photographers resolve disputes that might arise related to these topics.

At the same time, I remain interested in what experienced models have to say about other aspects of the guide.  I'm sure that there are gaps and (hopefully minor) inaccuracies related to some of the topics that I touch upon -- from preparing for a shoot to what items nearly every model should carry. 

Again, thanks to everyone for their valuable insights and advice!

Your book is very well produced. Good job.

Oct 11 12 12:53 pm Link

guide forum

Photographer

GPS Studio Services

Posts: 36236

San Francisco, California, US

ei Total Productions wrote:
Sorry, I have real problems with the information coming from the listed website.  I suggest referring to http://copyright.gov, http://photoattorney.com or http://asmp.org.  They are all much better sources.

VisiFoto wrote:
Yes, that URL is a secondary source from a photographer, not a primary source from a court or lawyer updated to Oct 2012.

But note that judges change opinions every day, including the SCOTUS.

75% of judges in USA never attended law collage, never got a license to practice law and many cannot even read.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/25/nyreg … ourts.html

"The law of the case" doctrine requires all judges to ignore all 10-million laws in USA, unless a party to the case specifically cites a specific law or court case.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_the_case

80% of opinions by appellate courts are "unpublished opinions" -- which are bogus verdicts based on non-existant laws that can never be cited as "law" by litigants in lower courts. In other words, the appellate court is lying, and bluffing that the "loser" will not appeal, which is due to lack of money in 99% of cases.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unpublished_opinion

So if you or your lawyer fails to cite a relevant case or law, you may not win your case, as if that law does not exist. I've personally won cases against govt lawyers who fail this basic test of the Rules of Evidence.

"Ignorance of the law is no excuse."
-Maxim of Law

No comment ... this is a discussion that should be better left for another day.  I will say this ... you have interesting views.  You don't seem to understand the mistakes in how you are interpreting the things you are citing.  I think you should re-read everything.  They don't say what you think they say.

Oct 11 12 12:57 pm Link

Model

Eleanor Rose

Posts: 2287

Santa Rosa, California, US

There's some good info. I spotted a few spelling and grammar errors, but not too bad.

A few things I would change/add:
-You did a good job explaining genres, but as noted above you left out artistic nudes, alt, etc. You might also want a small section about more advanced options such as underwater photos and bodypainting, and I would recommend a section detailing the different genres involved in nudity. Many models don't realize how diverse it is and lump it all in two genres: artistic or porn. I would personally detail figure modelling for artists and classes, figure modelling for photographers, bodyscapes, glamour nudes, fashion nudes, location nudes, erotic nudes, and fetish work. I would explain the major ways in which they differ as well as mentioning that they often overlap. Fetish should also mention that there is much opportunity to do fetish work fully clothed.

-A section on possible ways to make modeling work long-term would be helpful. Detail pros and cons of agencies vs. Freelance, and mention traveling. I'd suggest linking to Christie Gabriel's book: http://www.selfmademodel.com/

-For nude work, I recommend a wrap-around dress instead of sweats or a robe.

-Feminine care products should be included with things to bring.

-Modeling is not glamorous, and rarely leads to a glamorous life or career. Exciting and rewarding, yes. But also difficult and frustrating. I may be alone in this, but I think you might want to tweak that in the conclusion.

Oct 11 12 01:21 pm Link

Model

Isis22

Posts: 2567

Muncie, Indiana, US

It is obvious that your own personal likes and views are respresented. For example, the list of what lingerie to have at shoots. The fact that you don't believe a good strapless bra will work for head shots is a bit baffling. I am not sure what medical tape has to do with jewelry as well. As someone said sweats are a really bad idea because they leave lines that take a long time to go away.

Oct 11 12 04:02 pm Link

Photographer

See Sharp Photography

Posts: 45

Sausalito, California, US

I would just like to say I appreciate you making the effort to put this together.  Despite what may be some subjective material (and let's be honest, the entire industry is largely subjective) this must have taken a lot of effort and I applaud that.

Oct 11 12 05:04 pm Link

Model

Eowyn-Rose

Posts: 158

Seattle, Washington, US

I still consider myself a novice, but in my experience the list of "must haves" for wardrobe is full of several items I have never used and could be simply discussed before hand. The several types of underwear and pantyhose could be easily combined into one type (a multi-way bra), though honestly I have never worn pantyhose at all.
As a nude model (though this could be useful for any modeling) I recommend dresses/shirts that zip/button up so that if you style elaborate hair/makeup you can change into set clothes without disturbing either.
When working with a MUA I have in the past already applied basic foundation/powder to even out my skin tone. I will presumably already have my own shade available and it is a time saver. 
As for posing, I love that the hand thing is in there. I've had a lot of recommendations for very lightly touching fingertips to whatever item they rest upon to prevent awkward angles. If you do include art nudes, pointing the toes elongates your feet. Making sure you don't cross your back arm/leg/hand over the front arm/leg/hand keeps from looking like you've sprouted random body parts.

Oct 14 12 09:38 pm Link