Forums > Photography Talk > Windows 8 and photography......

Photographer

Quang Dang

Posts: 2955

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Still running WinXP in one of my machine.
Like I don't really care to upgrade LoL!

ChanStudio wrote:
Windows 8 feels backward to me..

Oct 30 12 04:15 pm Link

Photographer

I M N Photography

Posts: 2339

New York, New York, US

No crashes... I only had to reboot once, during the upgrade/installation phase, and all of my software was carried along with their custom settings.

Two apps weren't compatible (but I think it's because they were old old applications.)

It had a short learning curve, but I don't care much for the Start screen, although customizing it improved my experience.

Overall, I can say that the software that is memory intensive seems to be running much more efficiently (read: WAY LESS resources being used), and they did a nice job with the task manager by adding much-needed features.

It's going for US $69 from Amazon. If you download it directly from Microsoft you get it in about 15 minutes, with a registration key, and the ability to create an ISO image as a backup or install directly from the ISO download for $39.

Oh... And Windows Explorer has built-in ISO mounting.

I am seriously considering running it on my Mac Pro in an Oracle virtual environment.

p.s. You have to buy the Media Center Pack if you want to try out the Online video sharing options, but there is a promo going on for free Media Center Pack product keys.

Oct 30 12 04:15 pm Link

Photographer

JAE

Posts: 2141

West Chester, Pennsylvania, US

London Fog wrote:
Win7 is rock solid, and after the Vista debacle I'm not looking to change anytime soon! Plus, why have they even released this, just 3 years after 7? Makes no sense!

It makes perfect sense.  With tablets and phones being more popular they need something that can also be used on mobile platforms or their market share will shrink.

Oct 30 12 06:16 pm Link

Photographer

eos3_300

Posts: 1505

Brooklyn, New York, US

Jeremi Photo wrote:
For me there's been a noticeable performance improvement and it didn't long to get used to the start screen as opposed to having a start menu. Now that I've used it a bit I think I prefer it.

How long have you been a windows user ?
Maybe younger people are able to make the switch easier ?

Oct 30 12 06:43 pm Link

Photographer

Tog

Posts: 55204

Birmingham, Alabama, US

I've been using it since RTM.  I now have it on my desktop, my file server, a Lenovo Yoga (I needed a laptop and wanted to try the touch experience), and my desktop and laptop at work.

Having used it and gotten over the major learning curve in about a day, I'm amazed at the amount of FUD articles from "experts" who obviously haven't used it for more than a few minutes.

It's far from perfect, but it is no harder to use than Windows 7 with the start menu (just different), and adds a lot of new functionality that's cool.

As far as changes to your photography workflow.  There really shouldn't be any.  It works just like what you're used to now. 

The start screen looks different, but functions in a relatively straightforward manner.  Metro apps are more like widgets (have yet to see any with truly massive functionality that I'd want open full screen except the video player).  They're nice tools you can have pinned to the side of your screen while you do other thing (that's how I like to use the music player)..

But The start button was a popup that allowed you to organize apps to load (and often were filled with hundreds of app-install added crap that you'd never actually click on). 

The start screen is a full screen popup that allows you to organize apps to load (and in future forces app installers to only install ONE icon per app install).  The icons for the apps also have the ability to pop up live information relevant to the app itself (like your email app telling you you have new mail before opening it, etc...)

Also each screen your on (whether it's a metro app, the start menu, or the traditional desktop) has it's own popup charm bar that lets you get to custom settings (including the control panel on the desktop).  That's probably the most confusing bit since it's a completely new concept on how to get to some familiar tools.  It also has the new search function which is just as powerful as the old search function but now breaks the search results into types based on the apps you have installed (and defaults to the one you're using). 

That's it. 

There's a few hotkeys that make moving around in the tools considerably easier.  Spend 10 minutes learning them and there's nothing in Win8 that takes me longer to do than it did in Win 7.

Oct 30 12 07:25 pm Link

Photographer

Chuckarelei

Posts: 9562

Seattle, Washington, US

Sure there will be screw-ups in Windows 8, that's Microsoft. They always manage to screw things up, making it worst than it needs to be.

Just logged in to my hotmail account. OMG? WTF?! That's the proof of what I said above.

Oct 30 12 07:42 pm Link

Photographer

Leighthenubian

Posts: 2964

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

eos3_300 wrote:

How long have you been a windows user ?
Maybe younger people are able to make the switch easier ?

Dunno about that...been using Windows since it ran on 640K of RAM. There will always be people who resist advancement for one reason or another. I think it's a good development, just not a significant improvement for the power user.

Oct 30 12 07:48 pm Link

Photographer

Matt Knowles

Posts: 3563

Ferndale, California, US

Chuckarelei wrote:
Sure there will be screw-ups in Windows 8, that's Microsoft. They always manage to screw things up, making it worst than it needs to be.

Just logged in to my hotmail account. OMG? WTF?! That's the proof of what I said above.

The only reason I run Windows is to debug websites in all the various flawed versions of Internet Explorer. Since I can't run IE9 with my copy of XP, I started looking to upgrade it to Win 7. Saw that Win 8 was going to be released in a few days, and since the Win 8 upgrade is $39 and the Win 7 upgrade is $190 I was going to take a chance on Win 8. Parallels just warned against upgrading to Win 8 though.

I really hate giving money to Microsoft just so I can make sure their crappy browsers don't break my websites too bad.

Has Microsoft's font rendering been improved since XP? Even after turning on ClearType I'm surprised how chunky their font rendering is.

Oct 30 12 08:21 pm Link

Photographer

ShutterSpeedPhotography

Posts: 185

Tempe, Arizona, US

I upgraded to Windows 8 and established the new "start screen" was counter intuitive. All versions prior used the desktop for all their work and to launch applications/open files etc.  Windows 8 tries to force users for a new tile interface which is only useful for apps from the Windows Store. Any app outside of those (Any Adobe Apps, iTunes, Google Chrome, etc) are launched on the desktop. Thus defeating the soul purpose of Windows 8.

I also want to say when I switched to a local account I got logged off my computer and couldn't log back in. I was forced to go back to Windows 7 which I know and love

Oct 30 12 08:26 pm Link

Photographer

Marty McBride

Posts: 3132

Owensboro, Kentucky, US

Tog wrote:
I've been using it since RTM.  I now have it on my desktop, my file server, a Lenovo Yoga (I needed a laptop and wanted to try the touch experience), and my desktop and laptop at work.

Having used it and gotten over the major learning curve in about a day, I'm amazed at the amount of FUD articles from "experts" who obviously haven't used it for more than a few minutes.

It's far from perfect, but it is no harder to use than Windows 7 with the start menu (just different), and adds a lot of new functionality that's cool.

As far as changes to your photography workflow.  There really shouldn't be any.  It works just like what you're used to now. 

The start screen looks different, but functions in a relatively straightforward manner.  Metro apps are more like widgets (have yet to see any with truly massive functionality that I'd want open full screen except the video player).  They're nice tools you can have pinned to the side of your screen while you do other thing (that's how I like to use the music player)..

But The start button was a popup that allowed you to organize apps to load (and often were filled with hundreds of app-install added crap that you'd never actually click on). 

The start screen is a full screen popup that allows you to organize apps to load (and in future forces app installers to only install ONE icon per app install).  The icons for the apps also have the ability to pop up live information relevant to the app itself (like your email app telling you you have new mail before opening it, etc...)

Also each screen your on (whether it's a metro app, the start menu, or the traditional desktop) has it's own popup charm bar that lets you get to custom settings (including the control panel on the desktop).  That's probably the most confusing bit since it's a completely new concept on how to get to some familiar tools.  It also has the new search function which is just as powerful as the old search function but now breaks the search results into types based on the apps you have installed (and defaults to the one you're using). 

That's it. 

There's a few hotkeys that make moving around in the tools considerably easier.  Spend 10 minutes learning them and there's nothing in Win8 that takes me longer to do than it did in Win 7.

perfect...thanks!

Oct 31 12 06:57 am Link

Photographer

Monday Morning

Posts: 338

Norman, Oklahoma, US

I got Windows 8 on the first day so I could play. I think for many people this will rank up there with Vista in Microsoft's decision making pantheon. Windows 7 was a major and welcomed update. It was both technically and visually appealing. Technically 8 is a minor service pack type upgrade. Visually and workflow wise it is counter intuitive. I use Mac as well and there is a reason Apple has a different look for IOS & Mountain Lion. Touch screen ergonomics and keyboard/mouse workflow require different things from the user. Just because you make 2 things look the same doesn't mean they both work as well. I'm running both operating systems on different screens working in one and slowing trying to bring my self to terms with the other. I've decided at the moment I will hold off upgrading my road laptop to 8. I just don't see it as necessary or an upgrade at the moment.

Oct 31 12 07:14 am Link

Photographer

GCobb Photography

Posts: 15894

Southaven, Mississippi, US

There are several people in here who don't like change for sure.  This isn't Vista so that's out of the equation. Listen to those who have been running it for more than a few days.  M$ has this history of releasing a new OS that isn't quite ready but maybe this time is an exception.  If you don't like the GUI, change it so you will.  If you don't see a performance increase, you probably have a good reason to stick with your 10 year old version of XP.  smile

Oct 31 12 07:19 am Link

Photographer

eos3_300

Posts: 1505

Brooklyn, New York, US

Illuminate wrote:

Dunno about that...been using Windows since it ran on 640K of RAM. There will always be people who resist advancement for one reason or another. I think it's a good development, just not a significant improvement for the power user.

"resist advancement" ??
Not at all
Win 7 was a great improvement over past systems I warmly embraced it
I have been using Ubuntu the last several months I think it has some great features the learning curve has been worthwhile.
I dont think Win 8 is a good development
The Metro Interface has zero benefits for me
New does not always = better
MS has several examples of that

Oct 31 12 07:45 am Link

Photographer

Leighthenubian

Posts: 2964

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

eos3_300 wrote:

"resist advancement" ??
Not at all
Win 7 was a great improvement over past systems I warmly embraced it
I have been using Ubuntu the last several months I think it has some great features the learning curve has been worthwhile.
I dont think Win 8 is a good development
The Metro Interface has zero benefits for me
New does not always = better
MS has several examples of that

Agree with you on Ubuntu...but no Photoshop software...or any camera proprietary stuff runs on it. An OS is only as good as the applications written for it...

Oct 31 12 09:20 am Link

Photographer

ShutterSpeedPhotography

Posts: 185

Tempe, Arizona, US

http://www.change.org/petitions/continu … until-2016

Sign this petition if you want Windows 7 on manufactured computers until 2016

Oct 31 12 09:30 am Link

Photographer

Brooklyn Bridge Images

Posts: 9759

Brooklyn, New York, US

Illuminate wrote:

Agree with you on Ubuntu...but no Photoshop software...or any camera proprietary stuff runs on it. An OS is only as good as the applications written for it...

That would be the main reason I havent dumped Windows completely

Oct 31 12 11:18 am Link

Photographer

Marty McBride

Posts: 3132

Owensboro, Kentucky, US

Vista takes such a hit in every forum I read. It almost makes me want to not admit I still have it! lol  Thing is, it never does anything wrong. It boots up and does everything I ask of it. I don't have freeze ups, crashes, or whatever issues everyone else who ever had Vista, seems to be having. I do work on a Windows 7 frequently, and hate the folder system, and other than quicker boot up, I never felt the need to change anything. I had a hard drive failure almost 2 years ago, and everyone that knew, pleaded for me to either stop after re-installing Windows XP Media, or upgrade to 7. Personally I like the way it worked before, and didn't like enough of what Windows 7 did to warrant a $200. upgrade on a 5 year old pc. Windows 8 is $40. and my system still more than exceeded minimum requirements to upgrade. Reason this is important to me is, I'm wanting to upgrade my PC, and I'd like to know more about Windows 8 before purchasing a new one, while I still have the opportunity to get one with 7 on it. I'd like the system I buy to be installed with the OS I intend to keep, not an update.

Oct 31 12 11:19 am Link

Photographer

eos3_300

Posts: 1505

Brooklyn, New York, US

Marty McBride wrote:
I'd like to know more about Windows 8 before purchasing a new one, while I still have the opportunity to get one with 7 on it.

You could have downloaded it for free before the release
I think the test versions run till Jan 13

Oct 31 12 11:29 am Link

Photographer

Tog

Posts: 55204

Birmingham, Alabama, US

Marty McBride wrote:
Vista takes such a hit in every forum I read. It almost makes me want to not admit I still have it! lol  Thing is, it never does anything wrong. It boots up and does everything I ask of it. I don't have freeze ups, crashes, or whatever issues everyone else who ever had Vista, seems to be having. I do work on a Windows 7 frequently, and hate the folder system, and other than quicker boot up, I never felt the need to change anything. I had a hard drive failure almost 2 years ago, and everyone that knew, pleaded for me to either stop after re-installing Windows XP Media, or upgrade to 7. Personally I like the way it worked before, and didn't like enough of what Windows 7 did to warrant a $200. upgrade on a 5 year old pc. Windows 8 is $40. and my system still more than exceeded minimum requirements to upgrade. Reason this is important to me is, I'm wanting to upgrade my PC, and I'd like to know more about Windows 8 before purchasing a new one, while I still have the opportunity to get one with 7 on it. I'd like the system I buy to be installed with the OS I intend to keep, not an update.

Vista had some early showstopper issues.  They've long been fixed.  Windows 7 was actually a minor upgrade over Vista.  With a massively better PR campaign.

Vista's death was having some failings, and being the OS in existance when Apple started running it's I'm a Mac/I'm a PC ads.  The public perception is incredibly distorted.

Win8 may be the next one to suffer from bad PR, but if it does this time it's really going to be MS's own fault.  They released Windows 8, Windows Phone 8, and Windows RT all at the same time.  They're all using the same kernel under the hood now (which was a massive achievement), but that doesn't mean they all run the same software.  Windows Phone 8 is backwards compatible with 99.9% of Win Phone 7's software catalog, and future items going forward.  Windows 8 is compatible with all previous Windows software.  Windows RT exists because Microsoft NEEDED to have a version of it's OS running on mobile hardware and it's anybody's guess whether Intel will be able to catch up with ARM or drown in the mobile wave.  The problem is while they were able to get the OS running, app compatibility requires recompilation of each and every app (which won't happen).

So Microsoft has got an OS for every platform, but has done next to nothing to explain to the end user what the differences are.  That's going to cause a LOT of grief in the next few months...

Oct 31 12 11:32 am Link

Photographer

JohnEnger

Posts: 783

Jessheim, Akershus, Norway

Marty McBride wrote:
I realize I may be asking too early, but I'm in the mood to try something new. Now that 8 is officially out, has anyone tried this on a desktop, not utilizing the touch features, and if so, how does it enhance or complicate your workflow as a photographer?

Some stuff I have heard people troubling with is color calibration. Don't have any more detail on what tools they used, just that it was "XXbad wordXX incompatible"....

Oct 31 12 11:49 am Link

Photographer

JohnEnger

Posts: 783

Jessheim, Akershus, Norway

Marty McBride wrote:
Vista takes such a hit in every forum I read. It almost makes me want to not admit I still have it! lol

Mine works fine too! No hiccups at all. big_smile

J.

Oct 31 12 11:50 am Link

Photographer

eos3_300

Posts: 1505

Brooklyn, New York, US

Tog wrote:

My Win 8 issues have nothing to do with bad PR
I didnt even realize it had bad PR until I started looking for solutions to my frustrations of using it.

Oct 31 12 11:56 am Link

Photographer

Imageography

Posts: 6768

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

London Fog wrote:
Win7 is rock solid, and after the Vista debacle I'm not looking to change anytime soon! Plus, why have they even released this, just 3 years after 7? Makes no sense!

Actually from a corporate monopoly standpoint it makes total sense. Licensing upgrades alone sans media will make Microsoft a mint.

Where I used to work, we had over 800 workstations. All decided to update when Windows 7 came out. That was a big check they wrote.

Now, those same windows 7 clients may or may not upgrade, but regardless, that's where Microsoft makes their money, not from the Mom and Pop buying single copies of Windows 8 off the shelf.

Dec 10 12 02:11 am Link