Forums > Hair, Makeup & Styling > how much time should hair and makeup take......

Makeup Artist

Sarah Disco DiGisco

Posts: 7

New York, New York, US

i know this depends on what kind of hair and what kind of makeup, but is there a general rule as to how long hair and makeup should take? 

I've been testing a lot and doing both hair and makeup - i am a perfectionist.  BLEND BLEND BLEND and next thing i know its 2 hours later and the photographer is asking me "are we almost ready?"
not all photographers are impatient, but i am being unprofessional for taking up 3 hours for the perfect look?  its my work too and i want to put something that i am proud of in front of the camera.

Nov 05 12 08:37 am Link

Makeup Artist

Kim Y

Posts: 235

Los Angeles, California, US

im trying to get down to 20 minutes for makeup only.

When you are on a film set and they plop someone in the chair... you say i need 20 minutes... then they go.. ok you have 5. You have to make do with what you have in time.

I say try to speed up. 20 min for makeup 40 for both.

When you are on a set where they are paying you... no one will want to hire someone that takes 2-3 hours to do 1 person.

HTH

Nov 05 12 08:45 am Link

Makeup Artist

Sarah Disco DiGisco

Posts: 7

New York, New York, US

any tips for cutting down my time?

the worse the models skin the longer it takes....

Nov 05 12 08:50 am Link

Makeup Artist

Sarah Disco DiGisco

Posts: 7

New York, New York, US

did the last look in your profile take 20 minutes?

Nov 05 12 09:00 am Link

Photographer

LMG Images

Posts: 684

Nashville, Tennessee, US

Most take about 40 mins for mu.  Longer if hair.  2 hours would be way, way to long.  The model is going to wear down. 20 mins would be awesome.  It is good to have a good flow to the shoot.

Nov 05 12 09:03 am Link

Model

Natural_happy_girl

Posts: 3

Fareham, England, United Kingdom

I do think if it's for testing and you're not being paid, and you want to get it perfect I understand what you're saying...and for portfolio work some people will be very patient...
but you still need to let folks know in advance it's going to be 2 hours and explain that, else you could be eating into studio time/models next booking time....normally it's too long....

Realistically, you need to get down to an hour absolute max for hair and make-up...
unless it is some crazy prosthetics/body paint etc that's clearly going to take longer...

If you're being hired on a set to makeup multiple models and multiple looks then they all need to be ready together then change the looks it just won't work if you take too long....you'll get faster with practice.....

Nov 05 12 09:05 am Link

Makeup Artist

Kim Y

Posts: 235

Los Angeles, California, US

Tips on cutting down time:

-Practice
-Know your tools and products
-Know what you want to do ahead of time
-Know what to eliminate in your process like.. ok use 1 blush instead of 3, use 2 eyeshadow colors instead of 5, fill in the brows where needed instead of redrawing the whole thing, etc etc etc
-Have a routine so you are not standing staring at your makeup going what to do next
-Set up your station each time the same way so you form a habit to where everything is
-Practice

The look in my profile picture was built on top of another look that I did previously that day. I think I took 30 minutes the first look and this look that you are seeing here took me only 10 minutes to pack it on.

Let me know if you have any questions smile

Nov 05 12 09:12 am Link

Makeup Artist

Elizabethmakeup

Posts: 338

Hereford, England, United Kingdom

If it's for testing and I am doing hair and makeup, then I say 1 1/2 hours max. If I'm on a film set, then I am given a set time on my call sheet and I have to work to that. If I need extra, I talk to the A.D. ahead of time and explain why. Most of the time though, I get it done in the time allowed.

I used to time myself in order to cut down my time, as, if you are on films and are working on extras, you are given only 2 minutes for men and 3 for women, which includes foundation, concealer, powder, eyebrows and lipstick.

I have also had models with bad skin but I know my products and how to apply it to get maximum coverage in the shortest amount of time. The only thing that you can do is practice, practice, practice.

Nov 05 12 09:13 am Link

Hair Stylist

Keila Sone

Posts: 127

Harrison, New Jersey, US

Its all depends on weather you're being hire for a job or collaborating and clear communication.
At the conceptional stage: you received the mood board & concept.
1. Don't be afraid to ask stupid question.
2.always ask how many looks for each models
3. If you're doing multiples models and/or looks,consider bring an assistant to help you pre hair & make up.
4. If you know a specify look is complex ask the photographer to start pre earlier or let the photographer know it will take you about 3hrs to complete,that way he can pre studio & light,get lunch or scout for additional location,but they will mostly change it to something simpler,because they don't want spend that much time waiting.
If this your personal project:
Simply ask the models to meet up with you first at the location and ask the photographer show up 2 1/2 hours later,that way you'll be almost done.

Generally hair & make up takes 1 hour for both not each.
I personally notice that make up artist tent to spend the whole hour on make up for one model and then I have like 10 mins to complete a look before we start shoot,since most of the time we rent a studio or location — time is money,plus if you are being hired for a campaign,film,fashion show; they wont hire you again if you take longer than usually,that why I start with hair first and then do some finishing touches after dressing.

Best advice is to get an apprentice to help you out with pre,if so much easier this way and think of way that you can increase you speed.

I did a very important bridal shoot with 5 models,I asked my co-worker to assist me in prepping,I had all the hair style printed out,she curled all the models while I did the creative part and I did all 5 models in 30mins,because all the prepping was done already.

hope this helps
If  you

Nov 05 12 09:17 am Link

Photographer

Fotografica Gregor

Posts: 4122

Alexandria, Virginia, US

the team I shoot with for publication produces a complete look -  clean beauty makeup,  hair and wardrobe - in an average of 1hr 45 minutes. 

Avant garde looks of course take less time.

Nov 05 12 09:19 am Link

Photographer

Optix

Posts: 225

Boston, Massachusetts, US

Sarah Disco DiGisco wrote:
i know this depends on what kind of hair and what kind of makeup, but is there a general rule as to how long hair and makeup should take? 

I've been testing a lot and doing both hair and makeup - i am a perfectionist.  BLEND BLEND BLEND and next thing i know its 2 hours later and the photographer is asking me "are we almost ready?"
not all photographers are impatient, but i am being unprofessional for taking up 3 hours for the perfect look?  its my work too and i want to put something that i am proud of in front of the camera.

From the perspective of a very patient photographer:

The clock starts ticking when everyone is on set.

Whether it is a wedding, private event, or fashion show, you should try to compromise between what is perfect and what is good enough.

Your "speed" is a compromise between both.

note: I wouldn't advertise too loudly that it may take you a couple of hours to do a single makeup look.

That will scare away a lot of people that have to cover studio time, or have outdoor, weather-conscious shoots in mind.

Nov 05 12 09:23 am Link

Photographer

Matt Knowles

Posts: 3563

Ferndale, California, US

For me a three hour makeup session would ruin the shoot. Because by then I would be impatient and cranky as I usually book models for 2-3 hours of their time. I looked at the OP's port, and I don't see anything that I think should require anything close to 3 hours to apply. For the type of makeup you show in your port, I wouldn't expect more than 20-30 minutes.

Maybe you need to show us that 3 hour makeup job.

Nov 05 12 09:24 am Link

Makeup Artist

boy does makeup

Posts: 227

Atlanta, Georgia, US

I don't do hair... but my general time-frame for makeup application ranges from 45 minutes to 1.5 hours, with the 45 minute range for runway and multiple llamas. - the 1.5 hour range for creative/concept work.

that's just me... and I've had longer applications with consultations, but that's a different animal altogether.

-boydoesmakeup

Nov 05 12 09:29 am Link

Hair Stylist

A J T

Posts: 3113

Brooklyn, New York, US

I'm generally in agreement with everyone above. If I'm not done a basic hair look in 10 or 20 minutes, I'm seriously slacking. But I'm also a very experienced hair stylist. 30 minutes is still permissible for someone with less experience. I'm also not a very experienced makeup artist, but a simple look for a fashion story still doesn't take me any more than 30 minutes.

Fotografica Gregor wrote:
Avant garde looks of course take less time.

I think you mean more? I've easily spent 2 hours working on just the hair for an avant-garde look.

Nov 05 12 09:47 am Link

Photographer

Fotografica Gregor

Posts: 4122

Alexandria, Virginia, US

A J T wrote:
I'm generally in agreement with everyone above. If I'm not done a basic hair look in 10 or 20 minutes, I'm seriously slacking. But I'm also a very experienced hair stylist. 30 minutes is still permissible for someone with less experience. I'm also not a very experienced makeup artist, but a simple look for a fashion story still doesn't take me any more than 30 minutes.


I think you mean more? I've easily spent 2 hours working on just the hair for an avant-garde look.

No - I mean less, speaking of the makeup anyway.  A very nice clean beauty look is much more demanding than avant garde.  At least it is if it's done right.  The hair of course may take a bit longer but usually the tradeoff between hair and mua overall means that the look is produced in less time.

my team's "record" for clean beauty looks for publication is three looks produced and shot in 6.5hrs but on average 7.5hrs is more realistic. 

our "record" for highly avant garde looks for publication is three looks produced and shot in a little under 6hrs. Typical is not much over 6hrs.

Nov 05 12 09:51 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

I consider myself a very patient person and I certainly understand being a perfectionist. But it can be a curse when time is of the essence and there are clients on set.

Personally, if the hair and makeup took much more than an hour with everyone on set I would start getting antsy and a bit impatient.

If it's a case of you being a perfectionist and just feeling the need to constantly fix something (often something that really doesn't need fixing/blending/touching up) practice giving yourself a set timeframe and then STOP. Make yourself stop and take a break. It's when you're obsessing over it that it becomes a problem so step away.

If you do that during TF* or collaborations where all involved are a bit more lenient with their time maybe you'll find that all you really need is an hour and the rest is just unnecessary obsessing.

Then limit yourself to 30 minutes and see the results. Have a photo taken and compare the 2 hr, 1 hr and 30 minute prep time. Was there a massive difference between the results?

You just need to condition yourself.

Nov 05 12 10:02 am Link

Makeup Artist

Tegan Lynn MUA

Posts: 511

Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
If it's a case of you being a perfectionist and just feeling the need to constantly fix something (often something that really doesn't need fixing/blending/touching up) practice giving yourself a set timeframe and then STOP. Make yourself stop and take a break. It's when you're obsessing over it that it becomes a problem so step away.

You just need to condition yourself.

I agree with this advice. It's difficult to look at your work and not see every little tiny possible detail wrong with it. You just need to practice and train yourself out of it.

Nov 05 12 10:10 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Tegan Lynn MUA wrote:
I agree with this advice. It's difficult to look at your work and not see every little tiny possible detail wrong with it. You just need to practice and train yourself out of it.

Reminds me of the SATs or other tests in school. When that time limit arrives think "Pencils down!" and step away.

Nov 05 12 10:15 am Link

Photographer

Loki Studio

Posts: 3016

Royal Oak, Michigan, US

3 hours for makeup for one model is usually too much.  I know you want good work, but 3 hours of prep will generally have the primary effect of making the model and photographer mad and start with a terrible attitude for the shoot.

I generally expect an hour for makeup and 30 min for hair by a single stylist per model.

Nov 05 12 10:15 am Link

Photographer

R Michael Walker

Posts: 11986

Costa Mesa, California, US

Sarah Disco DiGisco wrote:
i know this depends on what kind of hair and what kind of makeup, but is there a general rule as to how long hair and makeup should take? 

I've been testing a lot and doing both hair and makeup - i am a perfectionist.  BLEND BLEND BLEND and next thing i know its 2 hours later and the photographer is asking me "are we almost ready?"
not all photographers are impatient, but i am being unprofessional for taking up 3 hours for the perfect look?  its my work too and i want to put something that i am proud of in front of the camera.

Depends on the situation but the best people I worked with back in my commercial days could do a good face in 10 minutes and the hair person could do it in 5 for simple styles. They were the exceptions...and given more time they'd use it and the results would improve..but that simple set was more than good enough for most clients. I tried to budget 20 minutes per look but sometimes, especially in catalog work, that wasn't possible. But when doing a single ad for some large company they'd have the model for as long as they needed. All that would be decided during the pre shoot meet. And yes, even prior to digital it was important to see the actual face and head they were working one. Saved a lot of problems.

PS..ever been backstage at a runway show?

Nov 05 12 10:21 am Link

Photographer

Leonard Gee Photography

Posts: 16406

Sacramento, California, US

Depends on the nature of the session and the client.

Most print & video shoots should only take 20 to 30 minutes. In rush situations, 5 - 10 minutes tops. Extensive work may take an hour.

For beauty work and make-up shots, whatever it takes. 2-3 hours is not unusual. For careful hair & beauty, a full color, cut, style, make-up can take 5-8 hours.

When it's also for the MUA's book, it's their call.

Nov 05 12 10:23 am Link

Photographer

Star

Posts: 17956

Los Angeles, California, US

Sarah Disco DiGisco wrote:
i know this depends on what kind of hair and what kind of makeup, but is there a general rule as to how long hair and makeup should take? 

I've been testing a lot and doing both hair and makeup - i am a perfectionist.  BLEND BLEND BLEND and next thing i know its 2 hours later and the photographer is asking me "are we almost ready?"
not all photographers are impatient, but i am being unprofessional for taking up 3 hours for the perfect look?  its my work too and i want to put something that i am proud of in front of the camera.

for testing YOU tell the photographer before booking how long the look will take

when working it is not unusual for a complicated editorial look to budget 2 hours for make-up and hair

HOWEVER some shoots can't afford the time, but those shoots generally pay a lot more and hire someone with the experience to do complicated looks in an hour or less.

Nov 05 12 10:37 am Link

Photographer

Azimuth Arts

Posts: 1490

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
I consider myself a very patient person and I certainly understand being a perfectionist. But it can be a curse when time is of the essence and there are clients on set.

Personally, if the hair and makeup took much more than an hour with everyone on set I would start getting antsy and a bit impatient.

If it's a case of you being a perfectionist and just feeling the need to constantly fix something (often something that really doesn't need fixing/blending/touching up) practice giving yourself a set timeframe and then STOP. Make yourself stop and take a break. It's when you're obsessing over it that it becomes a problem so step away.

If you do that during TF* or collaborations where all involved are a bit more lenient with their time maybe you'll find that all you really need is an hour and the rest is just unnecessary obsessing.

Then limit yourself to 30 minutes and see the results. Have a photo taken and compare the 2 hr, 1 hr and 30 minute prep time. Was there a massive difference between the results?

You just need to condition yourself.

Actually for TF/Tests I find that time is often less lenient for team members.  If the model or wardrobe stylist is doing me a favour on a test shoot they often want to spend as little time on set as possible.  So don't automatically assume if its a test everyone has more time than a paid shoot.  The difference will be that on a paid shoot people go into overtime and get paid more money, on a test someone might leave at the end of the arranged time.  If you really want to practice on speeding up the process find a friend and do your timing experiments on them, not while the rest of the team on a test is waiting around.

Just my $0.02

Nov 05 12 10:40 am Link

Hair Stylist

A J T

Posts: 3113

Brooklyn, New York, US

Fotografica Gregor wrote:
No - I mean less, speaking of the makeup anyway.  A very nice clean beauty look is much more demanding than avant garde.  At least it is if it's done right.  The hair of course may take a bit longer but usually the tradeoff between hair and mua overall means that the look is produced in less time.

Perhaps an avant garde look that simply abandons technique and sloshes colors onto someone's face, but if you get into things that involve crisp lines, many colors, etc. (think of Roshar, Kabuki or Alex Box's work), those things can take an hour or more to create. I'm not sure how much experience you have with things like that on set, since I don't see them on your port here (which I imagine isn't a comprehensive look at your experience), but in my time working with some very respected avant garde artists, 45 minutes is a minimum for those, since the clean beauty look usually has to be done before any of the avant garde can happen on top of it. Just because something is avant garde doesn't mean you don't need to pay just as much attention to creating a perfect canvas.

The good news is, when experienced photographers/creative directors go into a shot like that, they expect a lot time to be taken up by that process.

Nov 05 12 10:46 am Link

Photographer

rdallasPhotography

Posts: 966

Norristown, Pennsylvania, US

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
Reminds me of the SATs or other tests in school. When that time limit arrives think "Pencils down!" and step away.

This reminds me of when I took Art in college. I was doing a figure study using charcoal. At one point the instructor was standing behind me and just as I was about to put the charcoal back to the paper, he put his hand on my shoulder and said. "Stop. Very nice. It's completed."  He said anymore would begin detracting from it.

Nov 05 12 10:55 am Link

Makeup Artist

Sarah Disco DiGisco

Posts: 7

New York, New York, US

amazing! everyone has been so helpful!

Nov 05 12 12:41 pm Link

Photographer

Fotografica Gregor

Posts: 4122

Alexandria, Virginia, US

A J T wrote:

Perhaps an avant garde look that simply abandons technique and sloshes colors onto someone's face, but if you get into things that involve crisp lines, many colors, etc. (think of Roshar, Kabuki or Alex Box's work), those things can take an hour or more to create. I'm not sure how much experience you have with things like that on set, since I don't see them on your port here (which I imagine isn't a comprehensive look at your experience), but in my time working with some very respected avant garde artists, 45 minutes is a minimum for those, since the clean beauty look usually has to be done before any of the avant garde can happen on top of it. Just because something is avant garde doesn't mean you don't need to pay just as much attention to creating a perfect canvas.

The good news is, when experienced photographers/creative directors go into a shot like that, they expect a lot time to be taken up by that process.

True - my MM port exists for the purpose of attracting TF models for personal projects mostly....

Check back in a few weeks.  I have a four look conceptual avant garde series coming out in publication in November.   Implied nudes so no wardrobe styling.  Took 7.5hrs to produce and shoot. 

I've been thinking of posting that one. 

I agree that *hair* for avant garde can take a while - I work with a hair stylist who pre-produces a lot with fake hair pieces to incorporate into the looks.    And usually we've started with a clean beauty look before going avant garde, but not in the case of the conceptual series I mentioned above.

Cheers

Nov 05 12 12:51 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Aaliyah I

Posts: 226

Stevenage, England, United Kingdom

I found working in a make over studio really helpful to help speed up my time as well as working on skin that has the problems that agency models don't usually have, Vitiligo and acne for example. I had to do make up and hair in under 20 minutes  !

It was impossible at first but I soon created a routine and I had it down to a T. Most clients just said " I want my hair in curls and my make up quite natural" So I would put the hot rollers in straight away, hair spray it and pin the hair from the face. Before that I would of moisturised their skin so by then the moisturiser had sunk in and their skin was smooth and made the foundation glide on nicely. I would put on one colour of eyeshadow and some eyeliner and blend. Then mascarra and  eyeliner on the water line. I would use the lipstick as a cream blush too. Make up done. I would take out the heated rollers, finger comb and spray. Powder skin last and finished. Sometimes in 15 minutes if there was a group booking.

There is no chance on God's earth I could do it for fashion though. For me it depends on the day and of course, the look. Some days I'm on a roll and I'm getting models out of my chair as quickly as they were in and some days I'm a little slower. But I always aim to have make up done in 20 minutes and give it 210% each time. When I was at the last fashion show I did I timed myself using my ipod (Don't like having my phone out on set). The production team gave me 20 minutes so I gave myself 15 and 5 minutes for last looks.

I think having a routine will really help you, the way you have your kit laid out can make a huge difference too. When I first started I would stare at my kit like a headless chicken trying to think where is this or that but now everything is alot more organized. Palettes= life saver.  I think if your set up is simple and well condensed and there is less clutter your mind will be more clear and able to think. A MUA I once worked with had tons of single packed eyeshadows and lipsticks and took forever fiddling with the packaging, opening and closing lids it eat into her time working on the talent. (The stuff in her kit was awesome though ! She just needed to condense it)Your time will improve as you become more experienced and learn tricks to save time.

A mua on MM , I'm pretty sure it was Davis W, he mentioned stepping back and looking at the face as a whole rather than focus on the tiny little things only a mua would notice. Honestly that advice saved me alot of time ! I used to fuss over the details that didn't matter (when it's not beauty) and it would waste so much time now if it's a clothing shoot then I look at the face as a whole and see if the look all works together in harmony.

Work on a face you haven't worked on before and time yourself. If you take long with eyeliner specifically then practise it again and again until you have it down and it becomes your strongest point !  2 hours is way too long but if you learn to look at the face as a whole rather than a pair of eyes , lips and cheeks you will get quicker - hopefully. Practise is key smile

Being quick whilst maintaining accuracy is hard but it's a essential skill to have as a MUA x

Nov 05 12 01:33 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Marzena make up artist

Posts: 1

Mount Prospect, Illinois, US

Make up takes from 30- 45 max, depending on assignment and model skin condition of course. Hairstyling 30-1 hour max. I usually take 1.5 for both: make up and hair :-)

Nov 05 12 02:11 pm Link

Photographer

Blue Ash Film Group

Posts: 9538

Cincinnati, Ohio, US

I am one of those people who like everything right when the image is taken. I don't shoot as many images as most photographers do because i like everything to be the way we want them when I press the shutter button. I would rather the makeup and hair team spend the extra time to achieve perfection. All I ask is a reasonable estimate on how long it will take.

Nov 05 12 02:23 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Sarah Disco DiGisco

Posts: 7

New York, New York, US

Aaliyah I wrote:
I found working in a make over studio really helpful to help speed up my time as well as working on skin that has the problems that agency models don't usually have, Vitiligo and acne for example. I had to do make up and hair in under 20 minutes  !

It was impossible at first but I soon created a routine and I had it down to a T. Most clients just said " I want my hair in curls and my make up quite natural" So I would put the hot rollers in straight away, hair spray it and pin the hair from the face. Before that I would of moisturised their skin so by then the moisturiser had sunk in and their skin was smooth and made the foundation glide on nicely. I would put on one colour of eyeshadow and some eyeliner and blend. Then mascarra and  eyeliner on the water line. I would use the lipstick as a cream blush too. Make up done. I would take out the heated rollers, finger comb and spray. Powder skin last and finished. Sometimes in 15 minutes if there was a group booking.

There is no chance on God's earth I could do it for fashion though. For me it depends on the day and of course, the look. Some days I'm on a roll and I'm getting models out of my chair as quickly as they were in and some days I'm a little slower. But I always aim to have make up done in 20 minutes and give it 210% each time. When I was at the last fashion show I did I timed myself using my ipod (Don't like having my phone out on set). The production team gave me 20 minutes so I gave myself 15 and 5 minutes for last looks.

I think having a routine will really help you, the way you have your kit laid out can make a huge difference too. When I first started I would stare at my kit like a headless chicken trying to think where is this or that but now everything is alot more organized. Palettes= life saver.  I think if your set up is simple and well condensed and there is less clutter your mind will be more clear and able to think. A MUA I once worked with had tons of single packed eyeshadows and lipsticks and took forever fiddling with the packaging, opening and closing lids it eat into her time working on the talent. (The stuff in her kit was awesome though ! She just needed to condense it)Your time will improve as you become more experienced and learn tricks to save time.

A mua on MM , I'm pretty sure it was Davis W, he mentioned stepping back and looking at the face as a whole rather than focus on the tiny little things only a mua would notice. Honestly that advice saved me alot of time ! I used to fuss over the details that didn't matter (when it's not beauty) and it would waste so much time now if it's a clothing shoot then I look at the face as a whole and see if the look all works together in harmony.

Work on a face you haven't worked on before and time yourself. If you take long with eyeliner specifically then practise it again and again until you have it down and it becomes your strongest point !  2 hours is way too long but if you learn to look at the face as a whole rather than a pair of eyes , lips and cheeks you will get quicker - hopefully. Practise is key smile

Being quick whilst maintaining accuracy is hard but it's a essential skill to have as a MUA x

such great advice! i definitely get really close to the model and look at every little "pixel" on her face. apparently i have an obsessive attention to detail lol


thank you all again!

Nov 05 12 07:19 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Ms BSK

Posts: 886

Brooklyn, New York, US

I understand the desire to keep touching the makeup until it is perfect but in many situations that just can't be. Some of the tips here are helpful. I'd like to add that knowing your kit is going to be a huge time saver and for me that starts before I'm even on set. I know and carry the products that work. Having a pro kit means that I can work smarter when it comes to it.

Knowing who you will be working on is a huge help. If the person is pale I'm going to pack for that with my flash palette for adjusting. Some artists only have 3 or 4 foundations in their kit and the adjust and mix from that.

Keeping my kit organized is also a big helper - that way when I unpack it I know where everything is. I need to be able to unpack and repack it in less than 10 minutes.

When going into a testing situation did you talk to the photographer about the looks and concepts. If it is clean beauty I don't need that special red shadow that I want to try out. I can cut down on weight by bring only the items that I think are going to be useful. That is my starting point. I also use testing situations to try out new products. I limit myself to what I can possibly try in a particular situation. I won't try more than a couple of things at a time.

Look at your model what does she need? The areas that need the most work I start with first. If she has terrible skin attack that first with the techniques needed for that challenge. Now if she has terrible everything, I should have picked a better model.

One last tip that works for me is if I know that I have more than one model coming, which happens often, I will pack separate mini kits. In my kit I have separate brush rolls, highlighters, contour colors and what not for them. I can't keep my entire kit in front of me. I become like a kid in a candy store who can't make up their mind.

Practice helps with all of this as well. Keep working on different faces so that your own process comes to you like second nature.

Nov 05 12 10:40 pm Link

Photographer

Ally Moy

Posts: 405

New York, New York, US

I've been assuming people will take an hour for hair and makeup each. It's usually fairly spot on for most people. Just for test/trade/personal work. No rush forme but I learned not to listen to most people when they say only 20-30mins each. Its unfortunate but when I set the shoot schedule with their incorrect times and they take waaaaay longer it throws everything off and I end up either rushing shooting time or people get home late and  I feel like a jerk for asking people to stay longer than discussed.

So, quick is great but most importantly dont lie about your current time to sound more skilled.

Nov 06 12 05:37 pm Link

Hair Stylist

Platform Artist

Posts: 157

Chicago, Illinois, US

i  take an hour for hair and an hour for make up,  just start 2 hours earlier than projected shoot time....

Nov 06 12 05:40 pm Link

Photographer

William Kious

Posts: 8841

Delphos, Ohio, US

Three hours is way too long for a basic face. Sending out a make-up weary model isn't good for anyone.

Nov 06 12 08:12 pm Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

commercial clients paying models  $100.00 to $300.00 an hour... You will be lucky to get one hour for makeup and hair.  If you're doing a test, you just take as long as you need, money isn't involved...who cares?   Editorial... you normally get about an hour for makeup and hair...unless it's Vogue....I assume you take as long as you like on major Fashion magazines.

Nov 06 12 08:22 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Angie L MUA

Posts: 49

Los Angeles, California, US

Mary wrote:
commercial clients paying models  $100.00 to $300.00 an hour... You will be lucky to get one hour for makeup and hair.  If you're doing a test, you just take as long as you need, money isn't involved...who cares?   Editorial... you normally get about an hour for makeup and hair...unless it's Vogue....I assume you take as long as you like on major Fashion magazines.

Agreed. Every commercial job I've assisted or worked on, makeup is expected to be done in 15 minutes...After that 15 minute mark, you bet your butt a producer/PA/any-person-with-walkie is popping in hurrying you every five minutes.

Nov 07 12 11:24 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Maria Vittoria B

Posts: 57

London, England, United Kingdom

Kim Y wrote:
-Practice
-Know your tools and products
-Know what you want to do ahead of time
-Know what to eliminate in your process like.. ok use 1 blush instead of 3, use 2 eyeshadow colors instead of 5, fill in the brows where needed instead of redrawing the whole thing, etc etc etc
-Have a routine so you are not standing staring at your makeup going what to do next
-Set up your station each time the same way so you form a habit to where everything is
-Practice

+1
brilliant advice.
Also, know what the model DOESN'T need. She may not need a full face of foundation or brow powder for example. If you're shooting editorial, she won't need eye primer. And so on.

Generally speaking, 3hrs sounds like an awfully long time, not only for the model and photographer, but also for yourself. 

This is what it usually takes me:
- for beauty shoots: 1 hour or less, 30min for each look change (of course very complex avant-garde looks take longer)
- for fashion shoots/look books: 40 min or less
- for fashion shows: 15-20 mins
- for commercial: 15-30 mins

And this is after learning to cut down on my time. As Mary said, when you're testing you can take as long as you need, but paying clients will never book a MUA that needs 3 hours to do her job, so you might as well learn to time yourself in any situation.

EDIT: I should specify that I don't do hair, so the timing listed above is for MU only

Nov 07 12 11:50 pm Link

Model

Amelia Talon

Posts: 1470

Los Angeles, California, US

General rule I've encountered is no longer than 1 hour for hair and makeup. Natural looks should take less time, makeup beauty shots understandably take more time.

Nov 08 12 04:09 am Link

Makeup Artist

Rudy van den Berg

Posts: 28

s-Gravenhage, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands

One of my friends recently assisted on a harpers bazaar cover shoot and it took them almost 5 hours to get the model ready. Obviously this is an exception to the rule. I usually am given an hour and a half for hair and makeup.

Nov 11 12 03:11 pm Link