Forums > Off-Topic Discussion > Favorite Shakespeare Passages

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Poses

Posts: 8139

Kansas City, Missouri, US

Now I'll wait in happy anticipation for the "favorite Shakespeare passage" thread.

As requested in another thread.

Personally, I like the insults. I'm just waiting for the appropriate time to shout "OUT TAWNY TARTAR OUT!" in some chick's face.

Jan 11 13 10:14 am Link

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Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

From memory:  "Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow creeps !in this petty pace from day to day, to the last syllable of recorded time, and all our yesterdays but light the way to dusty death.  Out, out brief candle!  Life's but a poor player, a walking shadow that frets and struts his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more.  'Tis a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothng."

Some may find that passage depressing.  To me, it gives hope that life really is meaningless, and when you die, NOTHING HAPPENS!  big_smile

Jan 11 13 10:30 am Link

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Russian Katarina

Posts: 1413

London, England, United Kingdom

The Merchant of Venice:

Shylock
To bait fish withal: if it will feed nothing else,
it will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me, and
hindered me half a million; laughed at my losses,
mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my
bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine
enemies; and what's his reason? I am a Jew. Hath
not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs,
dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with
the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
to the same diseases, healed by the same means,
warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as
a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed?
if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison
us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not
revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will
resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian,
what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian
wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by
Christian example? Why, revenge. The villany you
teach me, I will execute, and it shall go hard but I
will better the instruction.

Jan 11 13 10:41 am Link

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surinity

Posts: 1481

Pattaya, Central, Thailand

Jan 11 13 10:54 am Link

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SME

Posts: 21050

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US

My favorite is Sonnet 29.

Jan 11 13 10:55 am Link

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-JAY-

Posts: 6707

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

Sita Mae wrote:
My favorite is Sonnet 29.

+ a billion.

Jan 11 13 10:57 am Link

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Toto Photo

Posts: 2792

Belmont, California, US

Russian Katarina wrote:
The Merchant of Venice:

...The villany you
teach me, I will execute, and it shall go hard but I
will better the instruction.

If I recall the play correctly it goes quite hard for the Christian, doesn't it, a pound of flesh, no? I bet you'd be http://assets.modelmayhem.com/images/smilies/scary.pngfun at a photoshoot.

Jan 11 13 11:01 am Link

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Russian Katarina

Posts: 1413

London, England, United Kingdom

Toto Photo wrote:
If I recall the play correctly it goes quite hard for the Christian, doesn't it, a pound of flesh, no? I bet you'd be http://assets.modelmayhem.com/images/smilies/scary.pngfun at a photoshoot.

Only if you try to poke - or prick me.

Then I will "cry havocke and let slip the Dogges of Warre", to quote Julius Caesar.

Jan 11 13 11:06 am Link

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kickfight

Posts: 27879

Portland, Oregon, US

From King Lear:

"This is the excellent foppery of the world, that,
when we are sick in fortune,--often the surfeit
of our own behavior,--we make guilty of our
disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars: as
if we were villains by necessity; fools by
heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and
treachers, by spherical predominance; drunkards,
liars, and adulterers, by an enforced obedience of
planetary influence; and all that we are evil in,
by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion
of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish
disposition to the charge of a star!"


and from The Tempest:

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."

Jan 11 13 11:09 am Link

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Toto Photo

Posts: 2792

Belmont, California, US

Russian Katarina wrote:

Only if you try to poke - or prick me.

Then I will "cry havocke and let slip the Dogges of Warre", to quote Julius Caesar.

The Flea
By John Donne
Mark but this flea, and mark in this,   
How little that which thou deniest me is;   
It sucked me first, and now sucks thee,
And in this flea our two bloods mingled be;   
Thou know’st that this cannot be said
A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead,
    Yet this enjoys before it woo,
    And pampered swells with one blood made of two,
    And this, alas, is more than we would do...

Jan 11 13 11:11 am Link

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Lumatic

Posts: 13750

Brooklyn, New York, US

Russian Katarina wrote:
Only if you try to poke - or prick me.

Then I will "cry havocke and let slip the Dogges of Warre", to quote Julius Caesar.

I guess that answers the question of Whether 'tis Nobler in the mind to suffer The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune, Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles, And by opposing end them!

Jan 11 13 11:18 am Link

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DivaEroticus

Posts: 14721

Fayetteville, Arkansas, US

I love Venus and Adonis

And from that:

'Fondling,' she saith, 'since I have hemm'd thee here
Within the circuit of this ivory pale,
I'll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer;
Feed where thou wilt, on mountain or in dale:
Graze on my lips; and if those hills be dry,
Stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie.

Jan 11 13 11:48 am Link

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angel emily

Posts: 1020

Boston, Massachusetts, US

http://breisebreiseleighgoleire1969.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/the-hokey-pokey-shakespearean-style.jpg

Jan 11 13 11:50 am Link

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Russian Katarina

Posts: 1413

London, England, United Kingdom

DivaEroticus wrote:
I love Venus and Adonis

And from that:

'Fondling,' she saith, 'since I have hemm'd thee here
Within the circuit of this ivory pale,
I'll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer;
Feed where thou wilt, on mountain or in dale:
Graze on my lips; and if those hills be dry,
Stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie.

It's kind of sad that Shakespeare loses a lot of that sexual innuendo in foreign translations. His plays can only be fully enjosed in their native language.

Jan 11 13 11:54 am Link

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Jules NYC

Posts: 16247

New York, New York, US

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action. - Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.

Jan 11 13 11:58 am Link

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Lumatic

Posts: 13750

Brooklyn, New York, US

model emily  wrote:
http://breisebreiseleighgoleire1969.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/the-hokey-pokey-shakespearean-style.jpg

lol

O Internet,
Wherefore canst thine Mirth ever shine,
And never be dimm'd?

Jan 11 13 11:59 am Link

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DivaEroticus

Posts: 14721

Fayetteville, Arkansas, US

Russian Katarina wrote:

It's kind of sad that Shakespeare loses a lot of that sexual innuendo in foreign translations. His plays can only be fully enjosed in their native language.

Very true.

Jan 11 13 12:07 pm Link

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DivaEroticus

Posts: 14721

Fayetteville, Arkansas, US

model emily  wrote:
http://breisebreiseleighgoleire1969.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/the-hokey-pokey-shakespearean-style.jpg

lol  I saw this last year, and totally forgot about it!!

And again I say lol

Jan 11 13 12:08 pm Link

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Lumatic

Posts: 13750

Brooklyn, New York, US

Sonnet XXXVIII

How can my muse want subject to invent,
While thou dost breathe, that pour'st into my verse
Thine own sweet argument, too excellent
For every vulgar paper to rehearse?
O! give thy self the thanks, if aught in me
Worthy perusal stand against thy sight;
For who's so dumb that cannot write to thee,
When thou thy self dost give invention light?
Be thou the tenth Muse, ten times more in worth
Than those old nine which rhymers invocate;
And he that calls on thee, let him bring forth
Eternal numbers to outlive long date.
If my slight muse do please these curious days,
The pain be mine, but thine shall be the praise.

Jan 11 13 12:16 pm Link

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Good Egg Productions

Posts: 15721

Orlando, Florida, US

"you are a fishmonger."

Hamlet

Jan 11 13 12:21 pm Link

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Gogar

Posts: 135

Göteborg, Västra Götaland, Sweden

"I'll not yield,
To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet,
And to be baited with the rabble's curse.
Though Birnam wood be come to Dunsinane,
And thou oppos'd, being of no woman born,
Yet I will try the last: Before my body
I throw my warlike shield; lay on Macduff;
And damn'd be him that first cries, Hold, enough".

Jan 11 13 01:16 pm Link

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Justin

Posts: 21916

Fort Collins, Colorado, US

"Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

I don't share Macbeth's pessimism, but I like the quote - so, too, did William Faulkner, who, like so many other authors, appropriated a snippet of Bill's work for a book title.

"What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god."

I might share Hamlet's irony.

And OP:  Thank you.

Jan 11 13 01:20 pm Link

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Compass Rose Studios

Posts: 15979

Portland, Oregon, US

There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come—the
readiness is all. 

Jan 11 13 01:20 pm Link

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Brian Diaz

Posts: 63192

Danbury, Connecticut, US

But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.


The ego on that dude was amazing, presuming that men would read his works into eternity...

Jan 11 13 03:09 pm Link

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Brian Diaz

Posts: 63192

Danbury, Connecticut, US

Poses wrote:
Personally, I like the insults.

http://www.shakespeare-online.com/quote … sults.html

Jan 11 13 03:12 pm Link

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Brian Diaz

Posts: 63192

Danbury, Connecticut, US

Jan 11 13 03:12 pm Link

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WIP

Posts: 15546

Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom

'a pound of flesh no more, no less'

Macbeth.

Jan 11 13 03:21 pm Link

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Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

model emily  wrote:
http://breisebreiseleighgoleire1969.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/the-hokey-pokey-shakespearean-style.jpg

The Bard himself would love this, verily.

Jan 11 13 03:28 pm Link

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Tropic Light

Posts: 7303

Kailua, Hawaii, US

Shakespeare was truly masterful with insults:

Hermia:  "Now I perceive that she hath made compare
Between our statures; she hath urged her height;
And with her personage, her tall personage,
Her height, forsooth, she hath prevail'd with him.
And are you grown so high in his esteem;
Because I am so dwarfish and so low?
How low am I, thou painted maypole? speak;
How low am I? I am not yet so low
But that my nails can reach unto thine eyes."

Jan 11 13 05:15 pm Link

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Managing Light

Posts: 1945

Salem, Virginia, US

Mark Anthony:
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble* Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.



*Said with a twist of the lips indicating the opposite.

Jan 11 13 05:41 pm Link

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Managing Light

Posts: 1945

Salem, Virginia, US

Justin wrote:
"Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

One of my favorites, as well.

Jan 11 13 05:45 pm Link

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Managing Light

Posts: 1945

Salem, Virginia, US

Macbeth:

Lay on, Macduff, and damned be him who first cries ‘Hold! enough!'

Jan 11 13 05:48 pm Link

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Digital Photo PLUS

Posts: 5503

Lorton, Virginia, US

Jules NYC wrote:
To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action. - Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd.

Jan 11 13 06:04 pm Link

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Stephen Dawson

Posts: 29248

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

SCENE I. A cavern. In the middle, a boiling cauldron.

    Thunder. Enter the three Witches

First Witch

    Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.

Second Witch

    Thrice and once the hedge-pig whined.

Third Witch

    Harpier cries 'Tis time, 'tis time.

First Witch

    Round about the cauldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.
    Toad, that under cold stone
    Days and nights has thirty-one
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.

ALL

    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Second Witch

    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the cauldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg and owlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

ALL

    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

Third Witch

    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witches' mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Silver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our cauldron.

ALL

    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

Second Witch

    Cool it with a baboon's blood,
    Then the charm is firm and good.

Jan 11 13 06:42 pm Link

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Model Sarah

Posts: 39294

Columbus, Ohio, US

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lplc6ynlFW1r1o1y4o1_1280.jpg

Jan 11 13 06:50 pm Link

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Managing Light

Posts: 1945

Salem, Virginia, US

Model Sarah wrote:
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lplc6ynlFW1r1o1y4o1_1280.jpg

Heresy!  Heresy!  Burn her!

Jan 11 13 06:58 pm Link

Body Painter

Monad Studios

Posts: 9793

Santa Rosa, California, US

“No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity. But I know none, and therefore am no beast.”
― "Richard III"

"I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams."
― "Hamlet"

Jan 11 13 07:17 pm Link

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Vintagevista

Posts: 11052

Sun City, California, US

Othello - I still remember most of it - even 30 years after standing onstage thru god knows how many rehersals

"OTHELLO: Her father loved me, oft invited me;
Still questioned me the story of my life
From year to year -- the battles, sieges, fortunes
That I have passed.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days
To th' very moment that he bade me tell it.
Wherein I spoke of most diastrous chances,
Of moving accidents by flood and field;
Of hairbreadth scapes i' the' imminent deadly breach;
Of being taken by the insolent foe
And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence
And portance in my travels' history;
Wherein of anters vast and deserts idle,
Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven,
It was my hint to speak -- such was the process;
And of the Cannibals that each other eat,
The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads
Do grow beneath their shoulders. This to hear
Would Desdemona seriously incline;
But still the house affairs would draw her thence;
Which ever she could with haste dispatch,
She'ld come again, and with a greedy ear
Devour up my discourse"

Jan 11 13 11:00 pm Link