Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > Creating a tryptic , level of control in photoshop

Photographer

shadow_show

Posts: 636

Northampton, England, United Kingdom

Hi


After some advice. I want to create a tryptic of images on a single canvas. Tall thin images of equal size ,side by side with a thin black sperator between each one. A simple task I would have thought , copy paste all three images onto plain black background and use the ruler to measure small cap between each. But... the seperate layers I can either get to slightly overlap or they seem to snap to a predfined gap..what I'm saying the level of control for moving/aligning doesnt seem to work out..

Any words of wisdom as to what I'm doing wrong ?


thanks

~simon

Jan 28 13 06:44 am Link

Photographer

Shoreline Pictures

Posts: 92

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Try to do a layout of your project using guides, then insert your images and they should snap to the guides if you have "snap to" turned on in your preferences. Also for small move adjustments use the nudge keys.

Jan 28 13 07:29 am Link

Digital Artist

Platinum Dust

Posts: 106

San Francisco, California, US

If you don't want the snap, you can turn that off (under the View tab for me -- it also says the shortcut is shift + control + semicolon), or simply use the arrow keys to nudge it precisely where you want it. When making triptychs I actually do the math to make sure I crop or mask all the images and dividers to exactly the width they should be, then slap together and let snap automatically do the arranging, but there are plenty of ways to do the same without numbers.

Jan 28 13 10:43 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

I use the Snap To feature but if you don't like that you could always create the Predefined Image Boxes for your images, lay them out like you want and then use a Clipping Path to insert the image into the existing box. That way the images, regardless of size, are constrained within the box.

It's a lot easier to do in InDesign but it works in PS too.

Or...
http://tv.adobe.com/watch/the-complete- … -triptych/

or...
http://blog.darinrogers.net/learn/tutor … photoshop/

Hope those help.

Jan 28 13 10:50 am Link

Photographer

Zack Zoll

Posts: 2807

Glens Falls, New York, US

This doesn't really answer your question, but I wouldn't put all three images on one canvas.  I would have three separate 12"x24" (or whatever) canvasses made, and hang them with about a 1" gap between them.

A triptych is three separate but related images.  Historically it was one large painting, with hinged doors that swing out to reveal two smaller paintings on either side, sort of like a cupboard, but with art instead of shelving.

The reason that it's done this way is that putting a line down something creates a very jarring split.  When it's canvas, and the piece exists as a physical thing instead of just pixels on a screen, it will look like you did it with a marker.  If you try and fade the dividing line, it will look like you did it with a marker really well.

Plus having three images allows you to sell it as a much more upscale 'set' or prints, or to sell individual images.  Not only does it look better, but it provides more opportunities for you to get paid.

Jan 28 13 10:57 am Link

Photographer

Mask Photo

Posts: 1414

Fremont, California, US

Zack Zoll wrote:
This doesn't really answer your question, but I wouldn't put all three images on one canvas.  I would have three separate 12"x24" (or whatever) canvasses made, and hang them with about a 1" gap between them.

preeeetty sure OP means a digital canvas in photoshop.

Feb 01 13 03:11 am Link

Photographer

pellepiano

Posts: 2286

Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

The Tych Panel can be very helpful when doing diptych, triptych  and the like.

http://lumens.se/tychpanel/

Feb 01 13 05:56 am Link