Forums > General Industry > why do girls give up on modeling ?

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Eliza C wrote:
Also it doesn't mean modelling is just a pastime or something to brag about: many of us take it very seriously because the vision of those that employ us depends on our commitment to it. And those of us that have made a living from it have done so because of that. We come second to the vision: it is the art, the clothes, the photography that we have contributed to creating that are important not us.

I'm pretty sure the question was "Why do GIRLS give up modeling?" And people are offering various reasons why. It may come as a shock to you but some of those responses you find so sexist are actually accurate for the group of models we're talking about. Yes, there are male models. The OP didn't ask about male models.

Models who give it up often do, in fact, give up their modeling based on the current man that is in their life. Some models who give it up after a short period of time did use it as a hobby and something to brag about to their FB friends. You can argue that and give all the individual exceptions you want...but, as usual, it's just threadjacking.

Nobody is talking about the models who take it seriously or are currently making a living from it...or the question would have been "What motivates models?"

Jan 31 13 09:00 am Link

Photographer

Angelfactory

Posts: 1559

Foley, Minnesota, US

My guess is a mix of friends lying to them about being model worthy in the first place or they have no intention of modeling to begin with but just want attention and to be told they're beautiful. Mix that with the fact pervs pounce on newbies like lions on a gazelle they get spooked away.
There is also the newbies with 3 cell phone pics in the bathroom mirror or clothes cluttered slobby bedroom that say they have modeled for years and do paid assignments only so never get contacted and give up.

Jan 31 13 09:09 am Link

Photographer

B R U N E S C I

Posts: 25319

Bath, England, United Kingdom

Damianne wrote:
Photography is ageless.
Modelling completely based on age and look.

+1

Twiggy - one of the most famous/influential models of all time, modelled for only 5 years from 1965 to 1970 and retired from modelling at age 21.

David Bailey, one of the photographers who helped bring her to prominence, is still shooting today at age 75.



Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com

Jan 31 13 09:12 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:

+1

Twiggy - one of the most famous/influential models of all time, modelled for only 5 years from 1965 to 1970 and retired from modelling at age 21.

David Bailey, one of the photographers who helped bring her to prominence, is still shooting today at age 75.



Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com

Good example.

Jan 31 13 09:18 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
Wasn't meant to be sexist.

You missed my point; That being, llamaing is tougher than MANY (newbies mainly) think when they first get into it. And that SOME (newbies mainly) just do it for a short time for the ability to say they did it or THEY (newbies mainly) lose interest because of the amount of hard work that actually goes into it.

I am sure you didn't. Nevertheless I find it sexist. Just pointing that out.
This part:

"Something to brag about on their FB page and maybe remember fondly as they age, after having kids and "settling down".

If it had said "...or pursuing an alternative career" it would have been acceptable but you made a stereotype. One that I don't think is true for the majority of llamas.

I accept your point about 'newbie' llamas but would argue that they were never really llamas - as in paid professionals - to start with. It still doesn't mean they won't go on to pursue successful careers. It was the settling down and having kids bit I found a little condescending towards women in general. Of course lots of women do have kids but these days they can also pursue careers at the same time while their husbands - even photographers - take on a little more of the responsibility!

So that doesn't get to the root of the question why women give up on llamaling. The answer simply is that llamas have a short shelf life generally as you are unlikely to be doing it at 60 so one chooses something else for the long term future.

And the same would apply to male llamas. And female photographers are also likely to be into photography for life.

Jan 31 13 09:20 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
I'm pretty sure the question was "Why do GIRLS give up modeling?" And people are offering various reasons why. It may come as a shock to you but some of those responses you find so sexist are actually accurate for the group of models we're talking about. Yes, there are male models. The OP didn't ask about male models.

Models who give it up often do, in fact, give up their modeling based on the current man that is in their life. Some models who give it up after a short period of time did use it as a hobby and something to brag about to their FB friends. You can argue that and give all the individual exceptions you want...but, as usual, it's just threadjacking.

Nobody is talking about the models who take it seriously or are currently making a living from it...or the question would have been "What motivates models?"

The question is why do girls give up on modelling true. The only relevant answer SHOULD take into account whether the same is true of male models - and it may well be. So therefore any answers with their roots in gender are bound to be sexist.

Otherwise one may as well ask why black people give up on school. Unless we look at why many white people give up on school we won't get a very satisfactory answer: the truth is it isn't to do with colour but with social deprivation etc.

Likewise the answer here is that modelling has a short shelf life as  a career and many of the reasons 'girls' give up on it are also the same why boys give up on it. Or maybe not. I am not saying it as a statement of fact but for the answer to have any meaning we have to also look at how long male models hang in there - newbies or not. Whatever, I very much doubt anyone would say male models just do it until they settle down and have kids.

Jan 31 13 09:27 am Link

Photographer

LPF Photography

Posts: 12

Woking-Byfleet, England, United Kingdom

alot of models also do it for extra cash to help pay Uni/college fees

Jan 31 13 09:28 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

LPF Photography wrote:
alot of models also do it for extra cash to help pay Uni/college fees

Indeed.

Jan 31 13 09:30 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:
I am sure you didn't. Nevertheless I find it sexist. Just pointing that out.
This part:

"Something to brag about on their FB page and maybe remember fondly as they age, after having kids and "settling down".

....

I accept your point about 'newbie' models but would argue that they were never really models - as in paid professionals - to start with.

Actually, I think you missed the point of this thread. We're not talking about seasoned, professional models. The question is "why do girls give up on modeling ?" I believe Luke was mostly referring to new and non-professional models.

And yes the bragging rights and FB "works at MODELING" is part of the fantasy that many starting out get caught up in.

Jan 31 13 09:31 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
Actually, I think you missed the point of this thread. We're not talking about seasoned, professional models. More the girls who claim to be.

I agree that is true and have said so. But also few professional models stay in it for longer than a few years - and often retire when at the top of their potential to pursue something else.
Furthermore the 'newbie' thing is probably also true of male newbie models.

The question also implied that photographers are in it for the long haul. I am also sure many photographers end up pursuing alternative careers or started with them. So it is the whole idea running though the thread that photographers are committed long term and models are not that I question. You can shoot photographs at 90 years old but are not likely to be modelling. So that is the realistic answer: modelling is out of nature a short term thing so can't really be compared to modelling. Also a model's job is to interpret vision. It isn't her own vision - so the drive in that respect may also not be the same as the photographer's.

Jan 31 13 09:34 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:
I agree that is true and have said so. But also few professional models stay in it for longer than a few years - and often retire when at the top of their potential to pursue something else.
Furthermore the 'newbie' thing is probably also true of male newbie models.

Males too, but again the title of the thread is  "why do girls give up on modeling ?" not  why do models give up on modeling ? or  why do professional models give up on modeling ?

It's a pretty narrowly defined question.

Jan 31 13 09:38 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
Males too, but again the title of the thread is  "why do girls give up on modeling ?" not  why do models give up on modeling ? or  why do professional models give up on modeling ?

As I said could you get a satisfactory answer asking about why many black people flunk school if you didn't also look at which white people also flunk school (and which black and white people don't) and see if there is a correlation?

The answer to the op is NOT to do with gender but rather the nature of the activity.

If the op wants an answer he has to consider why male models also aren't in the game for long or the answer will be  meaningless....or possibly sexist.

Jan 31 13 09:40 am Link

Photographer

ontherocks

Posts: 22610

Salem, Oregon, US

or to cover their medical care.

LPF Photography wrote:
alot of models also do it for extra cash to help pay Uni/college fees

Jan 31 13 09:42 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:

As I said could you get a satisfactory answer asking about why many black people flunk school if you didn't also look at which white people also flunk school (and which black and white people don't) and see if there is a correlation?

The answer to the op is NOT to do with gender but rather the nature of the activity.

If the op wants an answer he has to consider why male models also aren't in the game for long or it is meaningless.

ooookay, never mind. :-/

Jan 31 13 09:44 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
ooookay, never mind. :-/

It does mind if you want the answer and the answer is possibly equally applicable to male models.

Have a look at some newbie male model portfolios. You don't think some of them are in a fantasy wanting to put 'work as a model' on facebook?

Jan 31 13 09:46 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:

It does mind if you want the answer and the answer is equally applicable to male models.

"why do GIRLS give up on modeling ?" not "why do PEOPLE give up on modeling ?"

Just pointing that bit out...again. :-(

Jan 31 13 09:51 am Link

Model

Jojo West

Posts: 972

Silver Spring, Maryland, US

They get tired?

Based on my own experience, it can be tiresome and expensive. I just started up again after years of not modeling. There are days, weeks, months that I just don't feel like modeling. I work full time and I'm also married, most of my shoots are on weekends. My husband is supportive but sometimes I feel it takes away from the time we get to spend together. Sometimes I have low self-esteem ruts, where I feel extremely uncomfortable in my own skin, the last thing I want to do is try to look sexy when I don't feel it. Money? Buying your own outfits, extra girl maintenance, travel expenses, make-up, etc etc, those things can rack up the tab. Pregnancy? Some models may have had kids and their priorities change. The list can go on and on. Something can be a passion but that doesn't mean you can always pursue it.

Jan 31 13 09:54 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
"why do GIRLS give up on modeling ?" not "why do PEOPLE give up on modeling ?"

Just pointing that bit out...again. :-(

Just pointing out to you again also: the answer to the question must also consider the nature of the activity rather than assuming the answer is inherent in the gender. If it does not any answer could be sexist.

Jan 31 13 09:57 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Jojo West wrote:
They get tired?

Based on my own experience, it can be tiresome and expensive. I just started up again after years of not modeling. There are days, weeks, months that I just don't feel like modeling. I work full time and I'm also married, most of my shoots are on weekends. My husband is supportive but sometimes I feel it takes away from the time we get to spend together. Sometimes I have low self-esteem ruts, where I feel extremely uncomfortable in my own skin, the last thing I want to do is try to look sexy when I don't feel it. Money? Buying your own outfits, extra girl maintenance, travel expenses, make-up, etc etc, those things can rack up the tab. Pregnancy? Some models may have had kids and their priorities change. The list can go on and on. Something can be a passion but that doesn't mean you can always pursue it.

Now see, Eliza is VERY accomplished and would be the other side of the coin, with the question then being "why do PROFESSIONAL MODELS give up on modeling ?"

And her answer is very well stated.

Jan 31 13 09:59 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
Now see, Eliza is VERY accomplished and would be the other side of the coin, with the question then being "why do PROFESSIONAL MODELS give up on modeling ?"

So if the question is why do girls give up on modelling should have these answers:
1. newbie models male and female are likely to have false expectations and they just play at it to say they have done it to boast on facebook.
2. Professional models male and female are still not likely to be modelling for long either because of the dimishing demand for older models. Therefore they are likely to pursue alternative careers.
3. Photography as a career does not have a short shelf life and the more accomplished one becomes over time the more succesful one is likely to be. Therefore demand for the photographers service is liklely to increase with age rather than diminish - and the same is also true of female photographers.

There MAY well be some gender specific reasons too. But whatever answer is given must ask if the same is also true of males and not generalise eg settling down with kids, jealous boyfriend controls them etc are very demeaning to women.
As I said earlier there are also may jealous wives of photographers and photographers who may have to take a share of child rearing.

Jan 31 13 10:07 am Link

Model

Nicolette

Posts: 12698

Midland, Texas, US

I started just after I turned 18. I'm almost 23 now and in a semi-retired state.

I still love modeling. I hate it being my job. I traveled the country doing nothing but shooting for a year. I had no home. I made some amazing friends and was a part of some amazing photos.

But somewhere along the line, I grew to hate the job. I started being more testy towards potential shoots. I felt like I had to drag myself out of bed to go work. I was still very passionate about my work in general, especially the work I wanted, but the shoots that just paid the bills... It was very hard to stay motivated.

There are lots of very shitty people out there who drain the very soul out of a good model. We work a lot and sometimes [especially from the shoots that pay the bills] treated like utter shit. Sometimes this is a really crappy job. 1-3 years is all it really takes to suck the joy out of this for a lot of us. I include myself in that, and I'm 4, almost 5, years in.

Sometimes we just need a break. Sometimes others have broken us. Sometimes we're just over it. Shit happens.
No one questions a photographers "passion" when they decide to take a break. Why is it any different when a model does it?

Jan 31 13 10:08 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:
So if the question is why do girls give up on modelling should have these answers:
1. newbie models male and female are likely to have false expectations and they just play at it to say they have done it to boast on facebook.
2. Professional models male and female are still not likely to be modelling for long either because of the dimishing demand for older models. Therefore they are likely to pursue alternative careers.
3. Photography as a career does not have a short shelf life and the more accomplished one becomes over time the more succesful one is likely to be. Therefore demand for the photographers service is liklely to increase with age rather than diminish.

Not exactly. Your answer would be appropriate if Luke's question had been "why do PEOPLE give up on modeling ?"

But you're getting there. Gotta love semantics. :-)

Jan 31 13 10:10 am Link

Photographer

ontherocks

Posts: 22610

Salem, Oregon, US

i've never understood this part. i love my models (in a respectful way of course) and what they do for my camera! i can be a grouchy person overall but i've never even gotten mad during a model shoot. some of the nude models especially have just been the sweetest beings ...

Nicolette wrote:
There are lots of very shitty people out there who drain the very soul out of a good model. We work a lot and sometimes [especially from the shoots that pay the bills] treated like utter shit.

Jan 31 13 10:12 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Nicolette wrote:
I started just after I turned 18. I'm almost 23 now and in a semi-retired state.

I still love modeling. I hate it being my job. I traveled the country doing nothing but shooting for a year. I had no home. I made some amazing friends and was a part of some amazing photos.

But somewhere along the line, I grew to hate the job. I started being more testy towards potential shoots. I felt like I had to drag myself out of bed to go work. I was still very passionate about my work in general, especially the work I wanted, but the shoots that just paid the bills... It was very hard to stay motivated.

There are lots of very shitty people out there who drain the very soul out of a good model. We work a lot and sometimes [especially from the shoots that pay the bills] treated like utter shit. Sometimes this is a really crappy job. 1-3 years is all it really takes to suck the joy out of this for a lot of us. I include myself in that, and I'm 4, almost 5, years in.

Sometimes we just need a break. Sometimes others have broken us. Sometimes we're just over it. Shit happens.
No one questions a photographers "passion" when they decide to take a break. Why is it any different when a model does it?

I agree with you.

Jan 31 13 10:13 am Link

guide forum

Model

Koryn

Posts: 36716

Boston, Massachusetts, US

I quit modeling for the reasons I mentioned on the first page.

Men in my life had nothing to do with it, especially since the person I was seeing at that time was a photographer, who photographed me a lot, and was fairly ambivalent overall about whether or not I continued to model.

Jan 31 13 10:13 am Link

Model

Nicolette

Posts: 12698

Midland, Texas, US

Wynd Mulysa wrote:
But I did get a lot more offers for work when I was younger and less experienced than I do now, with thousands of shoots under my belt and a vast and versatile portfolio.

Same.

Jan 31 13 10:15 am Link

Photographer

Chris Macan

Posts: 12795

HAVERTOWN, Pennsylvania, US

Luke Ryan Photography wrote:
Photographers on the other hand seem to be into photograpy for life.

I know a ton of people who "got into"photography only to move on to something else after a relatively short time.

Jan 31 13 10:16 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

twoharts wrote:
i've never understood this part. i love my models (in a respectful way of course) and what they do for my camera! i can be a grouchy person overall but i've never even gotten mad during a model shoot. some of the nude models especially have just been the sweetest beings ...

I'm very much the same.

When shooting a woman (non-commercially) I imagined there was an emotional connection. Through the lens we were lovers and that I was there to do my utmost to capture those "feelings" in the images I do of her.

Probably sounds a little silly now though. And it's off topic again! Gotta watch that.

Jan 31 13 10:17 am Link

Model

Nicolette

Posts: 12698

Midland, Texas, US

Koryn Locke wrote:
I quit modeling for the reasons I mentioned on the first page.

Men in my life had nothing to do with it, especially since the person I was seeing at that time was a photographer, who photographed me a lot, and was fairly ambivalent overall about whether or not I continued to model.

I'm the same way. I'm just [for now] over it. I'm bitter, I'm grouchy, and I really don't care what anyone thinks about how I look anymore. I don't care about how marketable I am anymore. I know you understand this, but it feels AMAZING to have that sort of control back.

Like control over your hair color. Your [in my case] facial piercings. Tattoos.
I'm pretty much only shooting what I want, when I want now and it feels great.

Jan 31 13 10:18 am Link

Model

lock and key

Posts: 1415

Cockburn Town, Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands

Didn't have time to read the whole thread, but...

For me personally, modeling has only ever been a hobby, something that I enjoy very much, but would never engage in professionally. I have been doing it for a long time, about 8 years, but shoots are sporadic. Modeling takes a back seat to almost everything else I need to do in my life.

I think for most amateur/hobbyist models, they simply change. They find new interests and life priorities.

Jan 31 13 10:19 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
Not exactly. Your answer would be appropriate if Luke's question had been "why do PEOPLE give up on modeling ?"

But you're getting there. Gotta love semantics. :-)

If I asked you why female sparrows fly any answer that doesn't take into account why male sparrows also fly is worthless. The gender is possibly not relevant to the answer.

Jan 31 13 10:22 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Nicolette wrote:

I'm the same way. I'm just [for now] over it. I'm bitter, I'm grouchy, and I really don't care what anyone thinks about how I look anymore. I don't care about how marketable I am anymore. I know you understand this, but it feels AMAZING to have that sort of control back.

Like control over your hair color. Your [in my case] facial piercings. Tattoos.
I'm pretty much only shooting what I want, when I want now and it feels great.

Your work is very cool and your physique is excellent. Just saying. Off topic though, sorry. smile

Jan 31 13 10:22 am Link

Model

Aah

Posts: 79

Los Angeles, California, US

Luke Ryan Photography wrote:
Photographers on the other hand seem to be into photograpy for life.

Each individual model has her reasons...

For fashion models, it's a game made for 13-17 year olds. A lot of the top agencies will not even look at you if you are above 22 years old. Not to mention strict body measurement requirements that most women grow out of by the time they are in their 20's. Look at my port, high fashion look but big 'ol birthing hips because my body decided it wanted to fulfill it's biological purpose and be able to make babies some day.. :-P I am comfortable with that, I had my fashion reign but I love my body now. I was on every billboard, every magazine, whatever but that type of modeling is not who a woman is except for a very select few supermodels who make it their life. Otherwise, I just chalk it up to something I have done before that adds to experience but really doesn't make me any better than anyone else. I am confident in my experience and skill but humble about where it left me standing socioeconomically.

For anything besides fashion, there isn't enough money in it to last nor to make it a career. Not to mention, the age, body type bias strikes again. Even for art nudes, unless it's a character portraiture with someone who is severely overweight, most photographers are men and they want to photograph young shapely women. Even women want to photograph young shapely women because that is what the viewers want to see.

In my case, acting is my passion and I see modeling as an extension of that. I shoot almost every single day. I have shot just about every single genre so I have been bored before. With acting, I can go much further. I can be cast in a main role at 25,30, 45, 75...but not in an urban outfitters campaign. Get my drift?

If someone would pay my rates at any age of my life, I would gladly do this forever. But alas, I am a woman and my youth will fade, thus my "beauty" as society perceives it. I am absolutely a hippie about beauty, I believe that every single woman at any shape, at any age in her life is completely beautiful.

Jan 31 13 10:24 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:

If I asked you why female sparrows fly any answer that doesn't take into account why male sparrows also fly is worthless. The gender is possibly not relevant to the answer.

The Welsh do have a reputation for stubbornness. big_smile

Jan 31 13 10:24 am Link

guide forum

Model

Koryn

Posts: 36716

Boston, Massachusetts, US

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
Your work is very cool and your physique is excellent. Just saying. Off topic though, sorry. smile

Doesn't matter if your work's cool and your physique is excellent. When you're modeling, you have to try to be everyone's fantasy girl, to a certain degree, if you want to keep your bills paid. Not only is that almost impossible, it leads to burn out... quickly.

Jan 31 13 10:24 am Link

Photographer

Harold Rose

Posts: 2925

Calhoun, Georgia, US

Luke Ryan Photography wrote:
I have talked to alot of models and read alot of models portfolios and they often talk about how modeling is a "passion" for them.

However, it seems to me that most models really only engage in modeling for 1-3 years and then stop.

Photographers on the other hand seem to be into photograpy for life.

Faliure to create and treat it as a business:    Of course  the same applies to the photographer..   But then the photographer  stays on even if he must finance his hobby.

Jan 31 13 10:25 am Link

Model

Retiredmodel

Posts: 7884

Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
The Welsh do have a reputation for stubbornness. big_smile

I am not Welsh. Another assumption lol I am English.
I could say the same is true of Americans of course in any case but I don't think such generalisations about nationalities hold much truth either.

Jan 31 13 10:25 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Amanda Ashley Harris wrote:

Each individual model has her reasons...

For fashion models, it's a game made for 13-17 year olds. A lot of the top agencies will not even look at you if you are above 22 years old. Not to mention strict body measurement requirements that most women grow out of by the time they are in their 20's. Look at my port, high fashion look but big 'ol birthing hips because my body decided it wanted to fulfill it's biological purpose and be able to make babies some day.. :-P I am comfortable with that, I had my fashion reign but I love my body now. I was on every billboard, every magazine, whatever but that type of modeling is not who a woman is except for a very select few supermodels who make it their life. Otherwise, I just chalk it up to something I have done before that adds to experience but really doesn't make me any better than anyone else. I am confident in my experience and skill but humble about where it left me standing socioeconomically.

For anything besides fashion, there isn't enough money in it to last nor to make it a career. Not to mention, the age, body type bias strikes again. Even for art nudes, unless it's a character portraiture with someone who is severely overweight, most photographers are men and they want to photograph young shapely women. Even women want to photograph young shapely women because that is what the viewers want to see.

In my case, acting is my passion and I see modeling as an extension of that. I shoot almost every single day. I have shot just about every single genre so I have been bored before. With acting, I can go much further. I can be cast in a main role at 25,30, 45, 75...but not in an urban outfitters campaign. Get my drift?

If someone would pay my rates at any age of my life, I would gladly do this forever. But alas, I am a woman and my youth will fade, thus my "beauty" as society perceives it. I am absolutely a hippie about beauty, I believe that every single woman at any shape, at any age in her life is completely beautiful.

Hi Amanda -

Spoken like the true professional. smile

Jan 31 13 10:25 am Link

Model

Paige Morgan

Posts: 4058

New York, New York, US

Nicolette wrote:

I'm the same way. I'm just [for now] over it. I'm bitter, I'm grouchy, and I really don't care what anyone thinks about how I look anymore. I don't care about how marketable I am anymore. I know you understand this, but it feels AMAZING to have that sort of control back.

Like control over your hair color. Your [in my case] facial piercings. Tattoos.
I'm pretty much only shooting what I want, when I want now and it feels great.

This is one of the things I'll look forward to the most when I decide it's my time to retire.

Buying clothes I want, not stuff that is needed strictly for photo shoots that I never use in real life.

Cutting/coloring my hair whenever I please.

Jan 31 13 10:27 am Link

Photographer

JOEL McDONALD

Posts: 608

Portland, Oregon, US

Eliza C wrote:
I am not Welsh. Another assumption lol I am English.

An English person living in Wales. It's rubbed off on you. But then the English do come in 4th in the stubbornness race. smile

Jan 31 13 10:27 am Link