Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > Anatomy That Doesn't Suck

Photographer

Ben Hinman

Posts: 596

Westwood, California, US

Theres a lot of bad anatomy tutorials out there and i wanted to share my own methods. The most common way that is taught is this silly combination of "golden proportions" and using ovals to block out the legs and arms, as seen here:
http://realcolorwheel.com/humanproporti … redraw.gif

This is, (pardon my french) completely and utterly stupid. For one, no ones body fits exactly the golden proportions. We have all different shapes and sizes, and if we say a human is 6 heads long, that is ridiculous. The average adult human ranges from 5-7 heads long, has any number of different sized features, broad shoulders, smaller ribcage, lankier arms or shorter ones. Sure, we might share the same bones, but there is no "one size fits all" when it comes to proportions. And when you try to recreate that "magic formula" in perspective, the proportions get all wonky anyway. Add to that the fact that muscles are in fact NOT ovals, but convex tube shapes, and you might be better off just not learning anatomy at all.

I was lucky enough to study under an actual anatomist, and learned the proper way to build the human body from the bones up. I have modified her technique to suit my liking, and i welcome you to do the same. Of course i cannot fit an entire 12 week course into a picture, but here is a simplified summary of the first 7 or so weeks:
http://i50.tinypic.com/aaybq.jpg

Feb 03 13 07:33 pm Link

Photographer

Gabby57

Posts: 428

Coppell, Texas, US

Thanks!  Very interesting.

Feb 05 13 01:51 pm Link

Artist/Painter

JJMiller

Posts: 776

Buffalo, New York, US

I've drawn a lot of different naked people and this seems very complex, it's good to know some general rules but it's better to just do it a lot. Basically looking at angles and relationships between different parts, as well as really understanding the negative space, aka "developing an eye," is IMO the way to go. Unless I'm doing horror stuff I don't need to draw skeletons and flayed bodies.

Feb 09 13 12:29 pm Link

Retoucher

AKMac

Posts: 364

London, England, United Kingdom

I assumed this was meant to be a joke.

Feb 09 13 02:37 pm Link

Photographer

Ken Marcus Studios

Posts: 8595

Los Angeles, California, US

And, this is meaningful . . . how ???

Feb 09 13 02:48 pm Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Ben Hinman wrote:
The most common way that is taught is this silly combination of "golden proportions"
and using ovals to block out the legs and arms ...

I got your gold ...

http://img542.imageshack.us/img542/8168/bodyg.jpg

Feb 09 13 06:21 pm Link

Photographer

Motordrive Photography

Posts: 3731

Lodi, California, US

lol  haha  lol

Feb 09 13 06:26 pm Link

Photographer

Light and Lens Studio

Posts: 1858

Sisters, Oregon, US

"The wind blew,
And the Organic Fertilizer was airborne"

This cant be serious.

Feb 09 13 06:41 pm Link

Photographer

Ben Hinman

Posts: 596

Westwood, California, US

The people who think this is a joke, good luck drawing ovals for legs all your life. smile This is anatomy drawing 101, not high school art class. Bones are where its at.

I'm not saying you have to draw the entire bone structure but if you don't at least draw lines guiding where they're going to be placed, you lose a hell of a lot of definition. Knowing the structure of the femur, tibia and patella is absolutely essential if you ever want to draw realistic knees. Ribcage, shoulderblades, pelvic arch, collarbone, elbows, wrists... There are a million different places on your body where bones shine through. If you don't know, you're just uninformed, but if you think i'm being ridiculous then you're just plain stupid.

Feb 09 13 06:58 pm Link

Photographer

Ben Hinman

Posts: 596

Westwood, California, US

Peano wrote:

I got your gold ...

http://img542.imageshack.us/img542/8168/bodyg.jpg

LMAO. here we observe an anatomical depiction of the homo habilus gangbangus. Note an abnormally large set of ribs, most likely because they get broken so often in cocaine fueled rages.

Feb 09 13 07:02 pm Link

Photographer

Ben Hinman

Posts: 596

Westwood, California, US

JJMiller wrote:
I've drawn a lot of different naked people and this seems very complex, it's good to know some general rules but it's better to just do it a lot. Basically looking at angles and relationships between different parts, as well as really understanding the negative space, aka "developing an eye," is IMO the way to go. Unless I'm doing horror stuff I don't need to draw skeletons and flayed bodies.

Yeah the point was as soon as you move a limb in space the apparent length of them gets distorted anyway so the golden proportions don't matter! There are some general 'rules', most hands hang down in between the ribcage and pelvis but its better to angle sight then to break it down into some 2d set of proportions.

Feb 09 13 07:08 pm Link

Retoucher

AKMac

Posts: 364

London, England, United Kingdom

Ben Hinman wrote:
The people who think this is a joke, good luck drawing ovals for legs all your life. smile This is anatomy drawing 101, not high school art class. Bones are where its at.

I'm not saying you have to draw the entire bone structure but if you don't at least draw lines guiding where they're going to be placed, you lose a hell of a lot of definition. Knowing the structure of the femur, tibia and patella is absolutely essential if you ever want to draw realistic knees. Ribcage, shoulderblades, pelvic arch, collarbone, elbows, wrists... There are a million different places on your body where bones shine through. If you don't know, you're just uninformed, but if you think i'm being ridiculous then you're just plain stupid.

Truncated icosahedrons

Feb 10 13 01:05 am Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Ben Hinman wrote:
If you don't know, you're just uninformed, but if you think i'm being ridiculous then you're just plain stupid.

A teacher is born ...

Feb 10 13 06:03 am Link

Photographer

Ben Hinman

Posts: 596

Westwood, California, US

Peano wrote:

A teacher is born ...

I have... alternative teaching methods. smile

Feb 10 13 06:27 am Link

Photographer

Dan OMell

Posts: 1339

Amundsen-Scott - permanent station of the US, Unclaimed Sector, Antarctica

could be actually useful for compositing
http://vimeo.com/59091880#
look at 4m:30s - 4m:42s
some people prefer drawing and not using 3D software

matte painting thingy also, etc.

Feb 12 13 07:26 pm Link