Forums > Off-Topic Discussion > Tricky / Realistic SPAM-mers

Model

Emil T

Posts: 304

Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

I bet all of you get here those messages, starting with:
"Model,
......" and tons of promises that sound too good to be true.
Well, I made a fake e-mail, so I can reply to those offers and just see what it comes. If they use the e-mail later to send me some s**t - I don't care. But I am curious to see what it comes. So, interesting thing is, that I got more and more realistic answers, so in one moment you can start asking yourself: "Hmm, may be that is a real offer?",
but still... How to recognize what is realistic? Looks like people become very tricky in this, so that you can believe on those promises and send your info back. I never did, and I would never do. I am wondering what is your experience with such ones? Tell us your experience, so that beginners like me can avoid being tricked smile

Feb 03 13 11:02 pm Link

Photographer

Instinct Images

Posts: 22736

San Diego, California, US

Naw they're not spammers they're SCAMmers. It's always a variation on the same theme - we'd like to hire you for a job and we'll send you a check for more than the amount we promise you then you cash it and send the rest to someone else.

Of course the check always turns out to be bogus.

They target both models and photographers.

Simple ways to spot them: they use a gmail address (or some other free address) when they claim to work for Vogue or a big agency, they don't speak half way decent English, they capitalize words that shouldn't be capitalized such as He and Model and Agent, they don't use proper punctuation including putting no space around a comma or the space before the comma instead of after, they offer to hire and pay too much money without anything more than seeing a portfolio on MM.

If you have to ask then they answer is always YES it's a SCAM.

Feb 04 13 02:04 am Link

Model

Emil T

Posts: 304

Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Instinct Images wrote:
Naw they're not spammers they're SCAMmers. It's always a variation on the same theme - we'd like to hire you for a job and we'll send you a check for more than the amount we promise you then you cash it and send the rest to someone else.

Of course the check always turns out to be bogus.

They target both models and photographers.

Simple ways to spot them: they use a gmail address (or some other free address) when they claim to work for Vogue or a big agency, they don't speak half way decent English, they capitalize words that shouldn't be capitalized such as He and Model and Agent, they don't use proper punctuation including putting no space around a comma or the space before the comma instead of after, they offer to hire and pay too much money without anything more than seeing a portfolio on MM.

If you have to ask then they answer is always YES it's a SCAM.

Yes, but the point is that now they have "learned" how and they have become really tricky! I mean - e-mails sounds much more realistic, no mistakes, using some existing websites and so on. I am wondering If someone get more far than me in answering - as I said, I reply their offer from fake e-mail and that's all. When I get a new e-mail asking for my personal data, I never write back. But there will be for sure people who did wrote back. What happen afterwards?

Feb 04 13 03:14 am Link

Photographer

Dean Johnson Photo

Posts: 60173

Minneapolis, Minnesota, US

How to recognize what is realistic?

Please go to your mystuff page and find this graphic and click on it;
http://mms.ibsrv.net/images/info/AvoidScams.jpg

Then watch the video and read the article.

Please do some reading. The best way to avoid being scammed is to learn how to recognize them.

Feb 04 13 05:19 am Link

Model

Emil T

Posts: 304

Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Dean Soapbox Killer Photo wrote:
Please go to your mystuff page and find this graphic and click on it;
http://mms.ibsrv.net/images/info/AvoidScams.jpg

Then watch the video and read the article.

Please do some reading. The best way to avoid being scammed is to learn how to recognize them.

Yes, thanks, but once again:
my idea was not how to avoid SPAM/SCAM - I've already learned that. The idea is this 2 points:
1) Spammers become more tricky than in the past
2) People being tricked sharing their experience
For myself I can tell again - I really felt very "seduced" by the last one I got, but they couldn't "catch" me wink I am sure some people were more curious than me tho and probably got burned... Anyone? Sorry, it is just interesting to me.

Feb 04 13 05:38 am Link