Forums > Photography Talk > DSLR's seem huge now

Photographer

Jay2G Photography

Posts: 2303

Milford, Michigan, US

I was at Best Buy buying a GPS for my wife today.  While waiting for the sales guy to come back to ring me up I stepped across to the where the camera's were. Holy shit they seem huge. I have not handled a DSLR since I sold my Olympus E-5 and bought the OMD E-M5.  I really could not get over just how frickin big they are. They never seemed big to me before. I loved the feel of my E-5 and the 7D I felt had the same feel. But when I picked a 7D up I had to laugh because I could not get over the size. Even the D7000 seemed pretty large to me. I guess you grow used to things, I never seen myself shooting with a small camera. But man I appreciate a smaller camera even more. smile

Feb 13 13 07:40 pm Link

Photographer

Ed Woodson Photography

Posts: 2644

Savannah, Georgia, US

Pick up a Canon 6D or a Pentax K5.  They don't feel so huge.   Unless, of course, you put the vertical grip on them.

Feb 13 13 07:48 pm Link

Photographer

Raoul Isidro Images

Posts: 6290

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

I got used to the size of Full Frame cameras so I never noticed they are huge.

The EOS 3, 1V and F4, F5 are SLR cameras I used and they have never radically changed the shape and sizes from those to the current DSLR bodies.

What I find fun, are the tiny cameras that pack a whallop such as the DMC FT20 aka DMC TS20 which I use underwater shooting and on mountain hikes.

I am also very fond of my mini Canon IXUS 100 IS with it's own unique interface:

http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/560322_425047764194291_1007552171_n.jpg
Notice how small my camera is beside the standard iPhone.
The amazing thing about this camera is:
No matter how small it is, it has got an Optical Viewfinder! Yay!

.

Feb 14 13 03:43 am Link

Photographer

Dragos Codita

Posts: 83

Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania

Once upon a time there were large and medium format cameras.
When 35mm ones appeared, i bet they had the same reaction.

Time will change everything once again in 20-40 years, history repeats.

Feb 14 13 03:52 am Link

Photographer

Yingwah Productions

Posts: 1341

New York, New York, US

Actually I hate that they keep trying to make SLRs smaller. I wish they'd made the D800 bigger, my thumb feels crowed on the back

Feb 14 13 03:53 am Link

Photographer

liddellphoto

Posts: 1801

London, England, United Kingdom

Yingwah Productions wrote:
Actually I hate that they keep trying to make SLRs smaller. I wish they'd made the D800 bigger, my thumb feels crowed on the back

Agreed. Most of the people that care about camera size ae moving over to m4/3rds, NEX, fuji x-series.

Feb 14 13 04:48 am Link

Photographer

SKITA Studios

Posts: 1566

Boston, Massachusetts, US

Ed Woodson Photography wrote:
Pick up a Canon 6D or a Pentax K5.  They don't feel so huge.   Unless, of course, you put the vertical grip on them.

+1.  Definitely pick up a Pentax K5...it'll feel like your Oly in size but with a much better sensor ;-)

Most mirrorless cams have crappy grips on the body and it feels more natural to hold the lens while shooting instead of the body...

Feb 14 13 06:52 am Link

Photographer

Mcary

Posts: 1803

Fredericksburg, Virginia, US

SKITA Studios wrote:

+1.  Definitely pick up a Pentax K5...it'll feel like your Oly in size but with a much better sensor ;-)

Most mirrorless cams have crappy grips on the body and it feels more natural to hold the lens while shooting instead of the body...

JMO. but have always thought that putting a grip on small body was one of the dumbest idea ever.  Look your little XYZ camera has  grip just like on of those big DSLRs that the pros use.   I'll take something like the X100 over one of those any day of the week.

Feb 14 13 08:38 am Link

Photographer

Image Works Photography

Posts: 2890

Orlando, Florida, US

Jay2G Photography wrote:
I was at Best Buy buying a GPS for my wife today.  While waiting for the sales guy to come back to ring me up I stepped across to the where the camera's were. Holy shit they seem huge. I have not handled a DSLR since I sold my Olympus E-5 and bought the OMD E-M5.  I really could not get over just how frickin big they are. They never seemed big to me before. I loved the feel of my E-5 and the 7D I felt had the same feel. But when I picked a 7D up I had to laugh because I could not get over the size. Even the D7000 seemed pretty large to me. I guess you grow used to things, I never seen myself shooting with a small camera. But man I appreciate a smaller camera even more. smile

I know what you mean.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8105/8474269346_87a6b00b6e_n.jpg

Feb 14 13 09:52 am Link

Photographer

Legacys 7

Posts: 33857

San Francisco, California, US

To me the dlsr cameras are no more bigger than the old slr film cameras. Nothing's really changed as far as size. You have your larger slr Canon digital version of the Eos 1 film cameras. And then you have the 5D which is like the film version of the old Eos film bodies where there was an optional grip available. Same applies to Minolta film (Sony)years and Nikon.

For me, I need to battery grip because I have very long hands and it balances out the camera for me. Even with the grip, I can palm the camera.

Feb 14 13 10:02 am Link

Photographer

David Nelson Photograph

Posts: 348

San Antonio, Texas, US

GreatMomentsPhotography wrote:

I know what you mean.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8105/8474269346_87a6b00b6e_n.jpg

I love it!!!

Feb 14 13 10:02 am Link

Photographer

fullmetalphotographer

Posts: 2789

Fresno, California, US

Jay2G Photography wrote:
I was at Best Buy buying a GPS for my wife today.  While waiting for the sales guy to come back to ring me up I stepped across to the where the camera's were. Holy shit they seem huge. I have not handled a DSLR since I sold my Olympus E-5 and bought the OMD E-M5.  I really could not get over just how frickin big they are. They never seemed big to me before. I loved the feel of my E-5 and the 7D I felt had the same feel. But when I picked a 7D up I had to laugh because I could not get over the size. Even the D7000 seemed pretty large to me. I guess you grow used to things, I never seen myself shooting with a small camera. But man I appreciate a smaller camera even more. smile

First SLR I shot for news and sports back in college was the Nikon F2 a fully loaded MD-2/MB-1 and 50mm lens, the F2 would weigh in at just over six pounds.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8516/8474291674_b338263ffd.jpg
Nikon-Nikon-F2-Photomic by FullMetalPhotographer, on Flickr

Feb 14 13 10:04 am Link

Photographer

AVD AlphaDuctions

Posts: 10559

Gatineau, Quebec, Canada

Legacys 7 wrote:
To me the dlsr cameras are no more bigger than the old slr film cameras. Nothing's really changed as far as size. You have your larger slr Canon digital version of the Eos 1 film cameras. And then you have the 5D which is like the film version of the old Eos film bodies where there was an optional grip available. Same applies to Minolta film (Sony)years and Nikon.

For me, I need to battery grip because I have very long hands and it balances out the camera for me. Even with the grip, I can palm the camera.

I'm pretty sure this is deliberate, just like it was in the days of the old Nikkormat and 'big boy' Nikons. I'd be willing to bet there's not a single F1/motordrive shooter out there that can live without a full size camera and battery grip.  its what feels comfortable to them. I have a few film SLRs (canon, minolta and pentax) around and they are the size of my (small) Sony DSLRs.

Feb 14 13 10:11 am Link

Photographer

Light and Lens Studio

Posts: 1465

Sisters, Oregon, US

I picked up my 4X5 Toyo Rail camera.  It seems so small compared to the Cambo 8X10 field camera.

If you have trouble lifting a 7D, perhaps you should consider weight training.  After about 30 reps of 50# dumbells, the 7D will feel really light. 

Like a feather.

Feb 14 13 10:13 am Link

Photographer

fullmetalphotographer

Posts: 2789

Fresno, California, US

AVD AlphaDuctions wrote:

I'm pretty sure this is deliberate, just like it was in the days of the old Nikkormat and 'big boy' Nikons. I'd be willing to bet there's not a single F1/motordrive shooter out there that can live without a full size camera and battery grip.  its what feels comfortable to them. I have a few film SLRs (canon, minolta and pentax) around and they are the size of my (small) Sony DSLRs.

When I bought my D70s as a backup for my D2x, with in a week of shooting it I bought the hoodman grip (Nikon did not have a grip for it) because it was awkward to shoot especially with long lenses, the balance felt weird.

The super small DSLRs for me not be as stable a platform, but I am from the F2 with motor gen. wink

Feb 14 13 10:26 am Link

Photographer

AVD AlphaDuctions

Posts: 10559

Gatineau, Quebec, Canada

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
I picked up my 4X5 Toyo Rail camera.  It seems so small compared to the Cambo 8X10 field camera.

If you have trouble lifting a 7D, perhaps you should consider weight training.  After about 30 reps of 50# dumbells, the 7D will feel really light. 

Like a feather.

I do strip set curls starting with 50s (sometimes 45s). it's not a matter of what feels heavy when you pick it up. It's a matter of what feels heavy at the end of an 8 hour shoot.  Some people like to shoot one-handed. others prefer both hands. and others arent comfortable without a monopod under the base.  it's all a matter of preference and what kind of shots you are trying to get.  Everything has its place.

Feb 14 13 10:28 am Link

Photographer

AVD AlphaDuctions

Posts: 10559

Gatineau, Quebec, Canada

fullmetalphotographer wrote:

When I bought my D70s as a backup for my D2x, with in a week of shooting it I bought the hoodman grip (Nikon did not have a grip for it) because it was awkward to shoot especially with long lenses, the balance felt weird.

The super small DSLRs for me not be as stable a platform, but I am from the F2 with motor gen. wink

I couldnt afford an F1 or F2 back then. this is my revenge!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! tongue

Feb 14 13 10:29 am Link

Photographer

Backstreet Photography

Posts: 138

Salem, Oregon, US

I'm on the other end of the scale: when the Nikon 600 came out, it seemed like they took it away from its mommy toooo soon.  It seems tiny compared to my D2x and D3.  I prefer the size and weight of the pro gear.  I was going to get the Nikon 3200 for vacations, but it disappears in my hand.  To each their own i guess ~ m'

Feb 14 13 10:30 am Link

Photographer

-The Dave-

Posts: 8627

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

AVD AlphaDuctions wrote:

I'm pretty sure this is deliberate, just like it was in the days of the old Nikkormat and 'big boy' Nikons. I'd be willing to bet there's not a single F1/motordrive shooter out there that can live without a full size camera and battery grip.  its what feels comfortable to them. I have a few film SLRs (canon, minolta and pentax) around and they are the size of my (small) Sony DSLRs.

True, I have grips on all my DSLR's, without them, they just feel weird.

Feb 14 13 10:32 am Link

Photographer

Thomas Van Dyke

Posts: 1775

Washington, District of Columbia, US

AVD AlphaDuctions wrote:
...It's a matter of what feels heavy at the end of an 8 hour shoot...

truer words have never been spoken...
funny how fatigue can extract a precious toll after significant hours of continuous production work...

I smile in amazement when I see hobbyist strolling about with ultra fast ultra long telephotos that dwarf their camera's body... There are indeed compelling reasons that some of the most tenured runway event shooters use crop format... the reduction in glass weight is a true blessing by days end...

As for ergonomics? totally a function of the assignment's mission objective... albeit increased mass is unlikely a desirable element except in mono & tripods my humble estimation... I recently assisted a veteran commercial architectural shooter who's tripod was so massive that I could barely lift it... btw, it extended to over 20 feet... lol   

happy Valentine's Day smile

Feb 14 13 11:21 am Link

Photographer

maso-arts

Posts: 1111

Cincinnati, Ohio, US

AVD AlphaDuctions wrote:
I'm pretty sure this is deliberate, just like it was in the days of the old Nikkormat and 'big boy' Nikons. I'd be willing to bet there's not a single F1/motordrive shooter out there that can live without a full size camera and battery grip.  its what feels comfortable to them. I have a few film SLRs (canon, minolta and pentax) around and they are the size of my (small) Sony DSLRs.

fullmetalphotographer wrote:
When I bought my D70s as a backup for my D2x, with in a week of shooting it I bought the hoodman grip (Nikon did not have a grip for it) because it was awkward to shoot especially with long lenses, the balance felt weird.

The super small DSLRs for me not be as stable a platform, but I am from the F2 with motor gen. wink

Kodak DCS 420 (c. 1994) making the F2 w/MB-2 &MD-3 look puny. 
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8101/8473363685_e427e8b9ae_z.jpg

My first digital was a D70s w/o a grip.  Coming from an F4s to that small (and light) body took a while to get used to.  When I bought my D200, I immediately bought the MB-200 to go with it to give it more "oompf".

Feb 14 13 11:29 am Link

Photographer

Eric Jackson

Posts: 1290

Dayton, Ohio, US

Pick up a Canon 1Ds Mark III with an 85mm 1.2 lens.  It's 5 lbs. easy.

Feb 14 13 11:31 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

I don't have large hands but I can't even use a dslr unless it has a vertical grip attached. I think they feel so small and rinky dink and the grip adds substance for me.

I see the trend in smaller and I get it...I just don't like it.

Feb 14 13 11:32 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Backstreet Photography wrote:
I'm on the other end of the scale: when the Nikon 600 came out, it seemed like they took it away from its mommy toooo soon.

lol love it.

Feb 14 13 11:33 am Link

Photographer

Legacys 7

Posts: 33857

San Francisco, California, US

AVD AlphaDuctions wrote:

I'm pretty sure this is deliberate, just like it was in the days of the old Nikkormat and 'big boy' Nikons. I'd be willing to bet there's not a single F1/motordrive shooter out there that can live without a full size camera and battery grip.  its what feels comfortable to them. I have a few film SLRs (canon, minolta and pentax) around and they are the size of my (small) Sony DSLRs.

Pretty much. My old Minolta X700 is a prime example too. Same size as the dlsr. When I put the motor drive on it, it's the same as my A99 with Battery grip. Same with my Maxxum 7 film camera.

Feb 14 13 11:59 am Link

Photographer

Legacys 7

Posts: 33857

San Francisco, California, US

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
I picked up my 4X5 Toyo Rail camera.  It seems so small compared to the Cambo 8X10 field camera.

If you have trouble lifting a 7D, perhaps you should consider weight training.  After about 30 reps of 50# dumbells, the 7D will feel really light. 

Like a feather.

Yeap. I own a 4x5. Field camera. And used the monorail 4x5 in school during my 4x5 class. You carried that mother inside a suitcase that came with it the entire semester. Imagine lugging that thing from home to class or from home to location to shoot assignments. That's what we had to do.

Feb 14 13 12:03 pm Link

Photographer

J O H N A L L A N

Posts: 10330

Santa Ana, California, US

I was half expecting a story about an aging photographer finally emerging from his darkroom in nowhere North Dakota and being shocked by how popular digital SLRs have become.

Feb 14 13 01:00 pm Link

Photographer

Ally Moy

Posts: 405

New York, New York, US

I have no issues with size as long as the quality goes with it. I'd gladly use large format. It seems to just be physical limitations on optics that we're stuck with unless there is some groundbreaking discovery.

Feb 14 13 01:14 pm Link

Photographer

Select Models

Posts: 36234

Upland, California, US

I use a Nikon D5100... excellent image quality and its a pretty small and lightweight camera... significantly smaller than the 7D and D7000 you mentioned.  Are you experiencing 'hand and body part shrinkage'?... yikes   I hope not for AND your wife's sake... wink

Feb 14 13 01:19 pm Link

Photographer

Legacys 7

Posts: 33857

San Francisco, California, US

Ally Moy wrote:
I have no issues with size as long as the quality goes with it. I'd gladly use large format. It seems to just be physical limitations on optics that we're stuck with unless there is some groundbreaking discovery.

Me. The optics limits aren't there. You have some of the best glass on large formats. And way that you focus both lens, camera bellows, back etc. gives it some advantages. And there are obvious disadvantages too. One is the limited mobile ability that you have due to size.

Feb 14 13 01:25 pm Link

Photographer

Mike Collins

Posts: 1927

Orlando, Florida, US

fullmetalphotographer wrote:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8516/8474291674_b338263ffd.jpg
Nikon-Nikon-F2-Photomic by FullMetalPhotographer, on Flickr

I wish Nikon would create a retro camera like this as Olympus did.  I'd love to see a full frame digital version of the classic F2.  With just the very basics.  Hell it could be manual focus as well! smile

Feb 14 13 01:27 pm Link

Photographer

Barely StL

Posts: 932

Saint Louis, Missouri, US

My D3X with 70-200mm lens weighs more than my first three 4x5 cameras.

Feb 14 13 01:32 pm Link

Photographer

Mcary

Posts: 1803

Fredericksburg, Virginia, US

Ally Moy wrote:
I have no issues with size as long as the quality goes with it. I'd gladly use large format. It seems to just be physical limitations on optics that we're stuck with unless there is some groundbreaking discovery.

Not positive but think with the type of system, this case being 36x24 mm DSLR/SLR systems. Play a much great role in the size and weight of the lenses rather then the quality of the optics.   Example the Canon 35 1.4 Nikon 35 1.4 and Leica 35 1.4 are all considered some of the best quality lenses  out there, but because the Canon and Nikon are designed to used on Auto focus DSLRs they have to be much larger in size and weight.

Feb 14 13 02:54 pm Link

Photographer

Jay2G Photography

Posts: 2303

Milford, Michigan, US

SKITA Studios wrote:

+1.  Definitely pick up a Pentax K5...it'll feel like your Oly in size but with a much better sensor ;-)

Most mirrorless cams have crappy grips on the body and it feels more natural to hold the lens while shooting instead of the body...

Wow it took all of what 5 posts to get a this camera is better than your camera post.

Lets see how they measure up.

OMD-
425 g (0.94 lb / 14.99 oz)
122 x 89 x 43 mm (4.8 x 3.5 x 1.69″)

K-5
740 g (1.63 lb / 26.10 oz)
131 x 97 x 73 mm (5.16 x 3.82 x 2.87″)

6D
770 g (1.70 lb / 27.16 oz)    
145 x 111 x 71 mm (5.71 x 4.37 x 2.8″)

Yep, pretty close. maybe even closer in size and weight when your throw a lens on them.   In regards the the better sensors. One is a $2000 FF, and the other is a 3 year old body.  In my opinion in the side by side photo comparisons at hi ISO's. I don't see the K-5 being much better on any level. I'll still take the E-M5 over the K-5   smile

Feb 15 13 06:17 pm Link

Photographer

SKITA Studios

Posts: 1566

Boston, Massachusetts, US

Jay2G Photography wrote:
K-5
740 g (1.63 lb / 26.10 oz)
131 x 97 x 73 mm (5.16 x 3.82 x 2.87″)

6D
770 g (1.70 lb / 27.16 oz)    
145 x 111 x 71 mm (5.71 x 4.37 x 2.8″)

Wow.  I didn't realize the 6D was that small.  Now I'm going to have to go check it out...my wallet is going to be mad at you :-P
I remember checking out the K-5 w/ a Canon friend at B&H a few years ago and he thought it was tiny (he had a 5D :-)

BTW, not to say all mirrorless cams are terrible.  The Panasonic GH3 (or a hacked GH2) is amazing for video...better than the D800/5D in actual resolution from what I've heard...
High ISOs are different w/ low-light shooting if you have a bigger sensor.  Bigger photosites = better handling.  If you compare dpreview's studio lit photos, it'll make no difference.  You can do most studio lighting w/ a P&S w/ a hotshoe and it'll look fine...

Feb 15 13 07:29 pm Link

Photographer

NC Art Photos

Posts: 568

Raleigh, North Carolina, US

fullmetalphotographer wrote:

First SLR I shot for news and sports back in college was the Nikon F2 a fully loaded MD-2/MB-1 and 50mm lens, the F2 would weigh in at just over six pounds.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8516/8474291674_b338263ffd.jpg
Nikon-Nikon-F2-Photomic by FullMetalPhotographer, on Flickr

I got so "hot" looking at that camera! ;-)

Feb 15 13 07:36 pm Link

Photographer

Winternetmedia

Posts: 6

Bristol, England, United Kingdom

5dIII+Grip+70-200+580EX II is a fairly common loadout for me. anything smaller doesn't feel quite right to me

Feb 15 13 08:04 pm Link

guide forum

Photographer

-JAY-

Posts: 6709

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

I personally love the size of a gripped rebel. Dunno why.

Feb 15 13 10:55 pm Link

Photographer

DougBPhoto

Posts: 38614

Portland, Oregon, US

Jay2G Photography wrote:
I was at Best Buy buying a GPS for my wife today.  While waiting for the sales guy to come back to ring me up I stepped across to the where the camera's were. Holy shit they seem huge. I have not handled a DSLR since I sold my Olympus E-5 and bought the OMD E-M5.  I really could not get over just how frickin big they are. They never seemed big to me before. I loved the feel of my E-5 and the 7D I felt had the same feel. But when I picked a 7D up I had to laugh because I could not get over the size. Even the D7000 seemed pretty large to me. I guess you grow used to things, I never seen myself shooting with a small camera. But man I appreciate a smaller camera even more. smile

They are not huge, they are the exact size they should be, at least the professional ones.

The D7000 is too small for me to use comfortably.

Feb 15 13 11:11 pm Link