Forums > Model Colloquy > How to become a model....

Photographer

SitronStudio

Posts: 1064

Venice, Florida, US

In this video, Cameron Russell explains step by step how to become a llama. This should be required viewing for anyone who's ever said "I want to be a model".
http://www.upworthy.com/if-only-you-cou … his?c=ufb1

Feb 14 13 06:57 am Link

Photographer

KonstantKarma

Posts: 2513

Hickory, North Carolina, US

I thought you just had to take a cellphone pic in front of a mirror.

http://cdn.smosh.com/sites/default/files/bloguploads/camera-pose-bathroom-cellphone.jpg

Feb 14 13 07:01 am Link

Model

angel emily

Posts: 1020

Boston, Massachusetts, US

I think the part that struck most with me is when she acknowledged that who she is as a model is a "construct" put together and designed and made up by artists, stylists, photographers, etc.  It seems she feels that's not a true expression of who she feels she is.

I've often felt that way about it, too. smile

It also resonated with me when she said becoming a model is more about others choosing you, not you choosing it.  That is so true. 

It's apparent that's she's insecure, but when she relaxed, she was quite good and I think a lot of that came from the heart.  Kudos to her -- that's not easy to do, much less to a live audience.

Feb 14 13 07:23 am Link

Photographer

salvatori.

Posts: 3836

Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, US

She is a smart, insightful woman. She has experience to back up her statements. But...

- she cites that over 70% of young women are insecure about their bodies and explains how she is part of a 'construction' of an image. I agree with both these points.

But tomorrow morning she will continue to be a part of the industry that she admits is unhealthy. That part I don't get. If she feels that it is all so bad, surely, with her smarts, she could do something else?

Again, I have nothing against a person being a model. But to talk about how bad it is for yourself, for others, for society, etc., yet continue to do that thing... makes it more of a whine than anything else.

Kinda like when a rich person complains about how difficult it is being rich...

O_o

Feb 14 13 07:36 am Link

Photographer

Ken D Photography

Posts: 676

Marietta, Ohio, US

I'd like to show that video to most of the "models" that contact me for a shoot.

Feb 14 13 07:42 am Link

guide forum

Model

Koryn

Posts: 36735

Boston, Massachusetts, US

salvatori. wrote:
She is a smart, insightful woman. She has experience to back up her statements. But...

- she cites that over 70% of young women are insecure about their bodies and explains how she is part of a 'construction' of an image. I agree with both these points.

But tomorrow morning she will continue to be a part of the industry that she admits is unhealthy. That part I don't get. If she feels that it is all so bad, surely, with her smarts, she could do something else?

Again, I have nothing against a person being a model. But to talk about how bad it is for yourself, for others, for society, etc., yet continue to do that thing... makes it more of a whine than anything else.

Kinda like when a rich person complains about how difficult it is being rich...

O_o

I felt like she was being fairly neutral, realistic and objective. She points out there are wonderful things - like travel. She also states there are bad things, like models always worrying about having slim thighs and shiny hair, even though they're the slimmest-thighed, shiniest-haired people on the planet.

She is just addressing the fact that modeling is a stressful job, like any other, that it's not nearly as glamorous as people make it out to be ---

I didn't feel like she was putting it down hardcore or anything, just being very REAL.

Feb 14 13 07:47 am Link

Model

angel emily

Posts: 1020

Boston, Massachusetts, US

salvatori. wrote:
But tomorrow morning she will continue to be a part of the industry that she admits is unhealthy. That part I don't get. If she feels that it is all so bad, surely, with her smarts, she could do something else?

Again, I have nothing against a person being a model. But to talk about how bad it is for yourself, for others, for society, etc., yet continue to do that thing... makes it more of a whine than anything else.

I understand your points and think they're quite valid...

It seems she feels it's too late for her.  She questions young girls "Why do you want to be a model?" with the implication that "You could do so much more".

I think at one point she does mention that she's always going to be seen as an "underwear model" so any other ambition she may have is not going to be taken seriously (I may have misunderstood or misheard that part.)  This is an extremely important point for models here to consider.   Many models want that fame (that's relatively easier to get with the internet these days) but at the same time, must realize that modeling is a short career - looks fade, and then what are you going to do with your life?  Those images will still be around on the internet for a long time...

Feb 14 13 07:50 am Link

Photographer

salvatori.

Posts: 3836

Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, US

Not saying that anyone here is being defensive, and I appreciate the input, and again, I admire the woman for her smarts, eloquence and honesty.

And not to sound too much like 'a guy,' but I thought she looked more beautiful after she put on the print skirt and flats... (IMHO)

smile

Feb 14 13 07:55 am Link

Photographer

Kyle T Edwards

Posts: 434

St Catharines, Ontario, Canada

Even dressed casually, I thought she was beautiful, but after hearing her talk and how insightful and honest and thoughtful she is, I think I just fell in love.  I wonder what she's doing for the next sixty years?  http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb191/kristyellenx3/animations/th_smitten.gif

KonstantKarma wrote:
I thought you just had to take a cellphone pic in front of a mirror.

Nonsense; there's so much more to it than just that.  First, you need two or three friends to say "wow, you're SO pretty!  You should be a model! (Note: these are probably friends who don't have their own car and rely on you for transportation to and from school.)  Then, notice that the guy on the yearbook team has been taking more pictures of you in the stands than most people.  Either you or one of the fifty other cute girls sitting in your vicinity, but it must be you!  Then, and only then, do you go to the bathroom, strip down to t-shirt and panties, pull out the iPhone, and decide that your starting rates are $75 an hour, $100 on Friday (don't want to mess up social life, ya know).  And you won't do nudes...unless he's cute.

Note to all real models: yes, I'm kidding!  If you want to beat me up for it anyway, please PM me and I'll give you my address. I might enjoy it!  smile

salvatori. wrote:
But tomorrow morning she will continue to be a part of the industry that she admits is unhealthy. That part I don't get. If she feels that it is all so bad, surely, with her smarts, she could do something else?

Again, I have nothing against a person being a model. But to talk about how bad it is for yourself, for others, for society, etc., yet continue to do that thing... makes it more of a whine than anything else.

I didn't really take away that she thought it was all so bad being a model.  I think her point was more that she wishes society wouldn't judge people solely on looks.  It's not so much that she's sad that she has it so good, but she's sad that others have it so bad.  Her quitting modeling isn't going to change the number of minorities pulled over.  And really, it won't even change the self-image of girls, because when she retires, the modeling agency will find someone else to replace her, and the cycle will continue unabated.

Feb 14 13 11:27 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

But doesn't this type of criticism and cautionary advice to aspiring models always come from a gorgeous model who has already had her success in the industry?

I could see models viewing this and saying, "Sure...easy for you to say...and as unhealthy as it is...you endured it all to be a model."

You can talk about how unhealthy it is, racial profiling, or that beauty isn't everything...but when you're an attractive, tall, successful caucasian model who has succeeded, the after-the-fact criticisms ring a little insincere in parts.

Feb 14 13 11:46 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Kyle T Edwards wrote:
I didn't really take away that she thought it was all so bad being a llama.  I think her point was more that she wishes society wouldn't judge people solely on looks.

But if society didn't judge people based solely on looks she wouldn't have been a successful llama. It's easy to say that AFTER you've had your success...and when you're a gorgeous, tall llama.

All the criticisms didn't bother her so much that she decided to break from the industry and really make a statement.

Feb 14 13 11:50 am Link

Photographer

salvatori.

Posts: 3836

Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, US

Okay Michael, your two replies capture what I was thinking better than I expressed it.

I can't believe I'm writing a novel with such a half-assed 'mastery' of the written word... lol

smile

Feb 14 13 12:11 pm Link

Photographer

Tony Lawrence

Posts: 19225

Chicago, Illinois, US

I belong to another site where I made similar points and members fought with me.   Professional models in almost every genre have won a genetic lottery.   Modeling isn't a talent.   That's why the folks who talk about they only pay 'experienced' models are a bit full of it.    There is also the racial component.   Black, Asian and Hispanic models just aren't all that in demand.   She was honest and smart.   Fashion modeling is a great job but a lousy career.

Feb 14 13 12:45 pm Link

Photographer

NewBoldPhoto

Posts: 4897

PORT MURRAY, New Jersey, US

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
But doesn't this type of criticism and cautionary advice to aspiring models always come from a gorgeous model who has already had her success in the industry?

I could see models viewing this and saying, "Sure...easy for you to say...and as unhealthy as it is...you endured it all to be a model."

You can talk about how unhealthy it is, racial profiling, or that beauty isn't everything...but when you're an attractive, tall, successful caucasian model who has succeeded, the after-the-fact criticisms ring a little insincere in parts.

True, however if the criticism comes from anyone but "an attractive, tall, successful Caucasian model who has succeeded" it sounds like sour grapes.

Feb 14 13 01:31 pm Link

Photographer

Orca Bay Images

Posts: 32234

Woodinville, Washington, US

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
But doesn't this type of criticism and cautionary advice to aspiring models always come from a gorgeous model who has already had her success in the industry?

If it came from someone who utterly failed, it would be dismissed as sour grapes. IMO, she made valid points in a very honest and direct way.

Edit: Beat me to it.

Feb 14 13 01:31 pm Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Orca Bay Images wrote:

If it came from someone who utterly failed, it would be dismissed as sour grapes. IMO, she made valid points in a very honest and direct way.

Edit: Beat me to it.

Good point as well. I guess the only way it really holds weight is if a successful model at the height of her career just quits because of the state of the industry...and writes this type of article and become an advocate for industry change.

Granted, that would probably be a rare occurrence.

Feb 14 13 01:34 pm Link

Photographer

ontherocks

Posts: 22622

Salem, Oregon, US

The #2 model on zivity for 2012 based on number of votes is in her 50s. i don't know if we'll ever see kate upton on sports illustrated at 50, though.

e m i l y wrote:
Many models want that fame (that's relatively easier to get with the internet these days) but at the same time, must realize that modeling is a short career - looks fade, and then what are you going to do with your life?

Feb 14 13 01:55 pm Link