Forums > Photography Talk > Model Cancellations at the last moment

Photographer

Jay Manne aka JJimagery

Posts: 4

Miami, Florida, US

As a photographer and one who runs a business involved in photography, I am perplexed as to the behavior or people in this business who treat appointments as if they don't exist. A new model approached me on MM, asking me to do her portfolio. In speaking with her I assessed she was a serious, motivated young lady who was looking for a quality photographer to do this shoot. We agreed on a date and time, about two weeks in advance, as my schedule permitted. As the date approached, about 5 days prior, I wrote her and wanted to consult with her about the shoot. When I didn't get a reply I wrote again..... She replied to me, less than 48  hours of the shoot, "I found another photographer, thanks."

Is it me or is this total garbage? I wrote her back, indicating that,, once she knew she was not going to keep the appointment she had an obligation to contact me so I could free my schedule. I should not have had to find this information out myself, that a professional model would have made the effort to cancel on his/her own. I further suggested she not do this to anyone else, lest she gain a "reputation" and that this behavior was bad karma... Her response..... "You are very unprofessional!" How disingenuous is that??????

This is a small business, we all interact with one another on a number of different fronts and word of a bad apple spreads fast. I know this incident will be out of my thoughts in another week, but I could have scheduled two other shoots in her time slot. I did the responsible thing by contacting her well prior to the shoot and admit I was very skeptical of her when she didn't respond right away.

Should I be pissed or what? My time is no less valuable than anyone else and nobody has a right to waste that time. She wasted it, while I will forgive, I will never forget her name... she's on MM, by the way.

Mar 26 13 07:49 am Link

Photographer

Vector One Photography

Posts: 2777

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US

I know you're new here but...it happens all the time on MM and you'd better get used to it. There is a marked difference between online models, land models and models from modeling agencies.

Mar 26 13 07:54 am Link

Photographer

Mortonovich

Posts: 5544

San Diego, California, US

Jay, you're new here so let me give it to you straight - on M/M, 90% of the "models" are worthless. The other 10% are awesome.

That "new model" you encountered is pretty par for the course. She doesn't care what you have to say or think because she is only here to be able to tell her friends she is a "model".

Mar 26 13 07:55 am Link

Photographer

Shot By Adam

Posts: 5946

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

It's your first post so I'll be kind. This is a topic that is beaten to death in these forums on a daily basis. Models bitch about photographers not delivering photos and photographers bitch about models flaking. It happens. Not everyone in this industry is playing at the same level. In the future, please read through the newbie section and use the search function before starting a new thread.

Mar 26 13 07:55 am Link

Photographer

DEP E510

Posts: 1613

Miramar, Florida, US

Jay Manne wrote:
As a photographer and one who runs a business involved in photography, I am perplexed as to the behavior or people in this business who treat appointments as if they don't exist. A new model approached me on MM, asking me to do her portfolio. In speaking with her I assessed she was a serious, motivated young lady who was looking for a quality photographer to do this shoot. We agreed on a date and time, about two weeks in advance, as my schedule permitted. As the date approached, about 5 days prior, I wrote her and wanted to consult with her about the shoot. When I didn't get a reply I wrote again..... She replied to me, less than 48  hours of the shoot, "I found another photographer, thanks."

Is it me or is this total garbage? I wrote her back, indicating that,, once she knew she was not going to keep the appointment she had an obligation to contact me so I could free my schedule. I should not have had to find this information out myself, that a professional model would have made the effort to cancel on his/her own. I further suggested she not do this to anyone else, lest she gain a "reputation" and that this behavior was bad karma... Her response..... "You are very unprofessional!" How disingenuous is that??????

This is a small business, we all interact with one another on a number of different fronts and word of a bad apple spreads fast. I know this incident will be out of my thoughts in another week, but I could have scheduled two other shoots in her time slot. I did the responsible thing by contacting her well prior to the shoot and admit I was very skeptical of her when she didn't respond right away.

Should I be pissed or what? My time is no less valuable than anyone else and nobody has a right to waste that time. She wasted it, while I will forgive, I will never forget her name... she's on MM, by the way.

They call it "model MAYHEM"!

This stuff happens. You say a pro model would be considerate enough to cancel-- forgetting the model in question is new and NOT a professional!

Unless she is more beautiful than Aphrodite herself, you will get over this.

When models don't pan out, it just helps you to appreciate the great models that are considerate, professional, and reliable.

Just remember that disappointment is a part of life and move on.

Mar 26 13 08:01 am Link

Photographer

Abbitt Photography

Posts: 11723

Oakland Acres, Iowa, US

You see doing a shoot as a professional business, unfortunately many internet models do not.  Remember, all it takes to be a model, is filling out a free profile.

Internet modeling and photography is what it is.  You either do what it takes to book more reliable models, or you accept a higher cancelation rate.

Personally, there aren't many models with proven reliability where I live and I'm not willing to pay for the real pros, so I accept some will cancel.  I don't put anything into a shoot I'm not willing to loose, I don't every put myself in a position where I need a shoot to happen, and I make alternative plans for my time.

Mar 26 13 08:05 am Link

Photographer

B R U N E S C I

Posts: 25319

Bath, England, United Kingdom

Rule #1: Don't invest too much mental energy and certainly none of your money ahead of time when shooting with non-agency models who you aren't sure have a stellar reputation.

Rule #2: Don't be surprised when a newbie model flakes or backs out at the last minute. This is the reason for rule #1.

Rule #3: Always have a backup plan, even if it's only to settle down on the couch with a beer and a good book.




Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com

Mar 26 13 08:07 am Link

Photographer

Good Egg Productions

Posts: 15715

Orlando, Florida, US

How weird.

In the 6.5 years I've been on this site, I think I've have no more than 3 models contact me out of the blue to help with portfolio development.

You're very lucky.

Don't be too hurt. I hear this happens all the time on this site.

Mar 26 13 08:07 am Link

Photographer

ArtisticGlamour

Posts: 3846

Phoenix, Arizona, US

Here's the deal from my point of view...yes, it happens all the time here (if you let it).

This is what they say:
1.) My grandma died (again)
2.) I have to "work" at the last minute.
3.) My sister got into an accident.
4.) My boyfriend's car broke down.
5.) I got a rash/sunburn.
etc...
etc...

THIS is what I believe really happened:
1.) My ass looks big today.
2.) Shit...I'm out of eyeliner.
3.) My face looks puffy today.
4.) I really want to go to the mall with my boyfriend today.
5.) Shit...I got a rash/sunburn.
etc.
etc.

The way I have found to avoid this (I have a ZERO cancellation rate, now) is to COMMUNICATE! You have to get the model "invested" in the shoot...and build up a comfort level with you AHEAD of the shoot. Talk about the concept together. Let her know that you don't expect "perfection". Get her excited about the shoot's concept. Collaborate!

You will find that the "personal involvement" and "comfort level" is inversely proportional to the number of last-minute cancellations.

Mar 26 13 08:11 am Link

Photographer

Loki Studio

Posts: 3021

Royal Oak, Michigan, US

A 50% deposit will quickly eliminate all bullshit.

Mar 26 13 08:12 am Link

Photographer

L2Photography net

Posts: 2539

University City, Missouri, US

Your lucky she didn't just pull a no show the day of.
L2

Mar 26 13 08:14 am Link

Photographer

Rob Photosby

Posts: 2986

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

ArtisticGlamour wrote:
THIS is what I believe really happened:
1.) My ass looks big today.
2.) Shit...I'm out of eyeliner.
3.) My face looks puffy today.
4.) I really want to go to the mall with my boyfriend today.
5.) Shit...I got a rash/sunburn.
etc.
etc.

You left out:

6). I am a shit, so I don't give a shit.

Mar 26 13 08:17 am Link

Photographer

ArtisticGlamour

Posts: 3846

Phoenix, Arizona, US

natural beauties of qld wrote:
You left out:

6). I am a shit, so I don't give a shit.

LOL! +1...wink that should actually be  1.) !!~!

Jay Manne wrote:
Should I be pissed or what? My time is no less valuable than anyone else and nobody has a right to waste that time. She wasted it, while I will forgive, I will never forget her name... she's on MM, by the way.

PS: the way that you can keep track of her is to add her to your "blocked" list.
She will not be able to contact you again. It helps to stop her in 2 months from now when she tries that shit again.

Mar 26 13 08:21 am Link

Photographer

Rob Photosby

Posts: 2986

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Beware the pretty girl syndrome.

For a female, being pretty is a double-edged sword.  Being pretty gets doors opened that would otherwise be closed. 

However, the danger is that the pretty girl comes to think that all doors open for her as a matter of birthright and that that is the natural order of things, so she can safely ignore the conventions of civilised society like keeping her word, acting responsibly, etc.

Eventually, the real world catches up with the pretty girl because prettiness always fades, but that is probably a few years away for your example and the millions of others like her.  Nevertheless, in twenty years time, she will probably be divorced, unhappy, and wondering why.

Mar 26 13 08:23 am Link

Photographer

ontherocks

Posts: 22610

Salem, Oregon, US

at least she gave you some advance notice and a credible reason. it could have been worse.

for our paying customers we have them make a $20 upfront payment and since we started doing that they've all shown up. i haven't tried that on a llama, though.

take some time to get used to how things work around here. search for some of the many flake threads. some of these girls aren't taking it very seriously or will drop you if they find someone who is a better fit for them. to me when a llama says "yes" to a shoot that's more an indication of interest than a promise they will show up. the worst are the ones who no-show and you never hear from them again.

for me paying the llama has always worked but others report flakes even when paying.

Mar 26 13 08:24 am Link

Photographer

ArtisticGlamour

Posts: 3846

Phoenix, Arizona, US

natural beauties of qld wrote:
Beware the pretty girl syndrome.

For a female, being pretty is a double-edged sword.  Being pretty gets doors opened that would otherwise be closed. 

However, the danger is that the pretty girl comes to think that all doors open for her as a matter of birthright and that that is the natural order of things, so she can safely ignore the conventions of civilised society like keeping her word, acting responsibly, etc.

Eventually, the real world catches up with the pretty girl because prettiness always fades, but that is probably a few years away for your example and the millions of others like her.  Nevertheless, in twenty years time, she will probably be divorced, unhappy, and wondering why.

Quoted again for TRUTH! I call it Cleopatra Syndrome. wink LOL!

Mar 26 13 08:25 am Link

Photographer

Top Gun Digital

Posts: 1273

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

Jay Manne wrote:
Is it me or is this total garbage? I wrote her back, indicating that,, once she knew she was not going to keep the appointment she had an obligation to contact me so I could free my schedule. I should not have had to find this information out myself, that a professional model would have made the effort to cancel on his/her own. I further suggested she not do this to anyone else, lest she gain a "reputation" and that this behavior was bad karma... Her response..... "You are very unprofessional!" How disingenuous is that??????


Should I be pissed or what? My time is no less valuable than anyone else and nobody has a right to waste that time. She wasted it, while I will forgive, I will never forget her name... she's on MM, by the way.

You need to understand that the majority of people on MM, both models and photographers are not professionals.  It's very common for models to disregard appointments they have made and never tell the photographer they have changed their mind.  Real professional models will act like professionals.  The amateur models that make up the majority here will always act like amateurs.  It's just something you need to get used to if you intend to use MM as a resource for finding models.

On the other side of the coin I have had models tell me horror stories about photographers here on MM as well.  I know one model that was traveling to Vegas and booked five shoots just to have four photographers bail on her.

Mar 26 13 08:30 am Link

Photographer

Robert Mossack

Posts: 1251

Joplin, Missouri, US

Hey, It happens, it's the nature of the internet llamaing beast. Just move on to the next llama and don't stress.

Mar 26 13 08:31 am Link

Photographer

Marin Photography NYC

Posts: 7248

New York, New York, US

Require a deposit. This way if they don't show at least you have something to buy beer with!....

Mar 26 13 08:35 am Link

Photographer

Looknsee Photography

Posts: 21664

Portland, Oregon, US

Jay Manne wrote:
< snip >

A new model approached me on MM, asking me to do her portfolio. In speaking with her I assessed she was a serious, motivated young lady who was looking for a quality photographer to do this shoot.

< snip >

I don't mean to be cruel or flippant, but...

...  The reality here is that there is a wide, wide range of experience & maturity here on MM.

...  If the model was hiring you, it's like any other profession -- people will change their mind at the last minute.  That's even true at doctors' offices.

...  If we are talking about you hiring the model or you doing a trade with the model, I can point out that your "assessment" turned out not to be accurate.  Figure out how to make more accurate assessments.  I'm a big believer in a couple of things:
     1)  Check references.
     2)  Form a little local photographic community & share experiences with the
          other photographers in your area.

...  We like our models young, but we want the reliability of veterans with 15 years experience.  When dealing with young people, you sometimes have to expect people who are less reliable than you would like.  Sorry.

Again, apologies if I came off blunt -- I am trying to be constructive.

Mar 26 13 08:36 am Link

Photographer

Silver Mirage

Posts: 1578

Plainview, Texas, US

It's not just internet llamas - anyone who has done photography very long has a few of these stories. Wedding photographers, corporate photographers, seniors and portraits - no one is safe. For that matter, it happens to doctors, lawyers and plumbers.

Just yesterday I had to change an appointment with my doctor to do a photo job today that postponed from last week, so I'm in no position to talk.

Mar 26 13 08:41 am Link

Photographer

AJ_In_Atlanta

Posts: 12835

Atlanta, Georgia, US

First of all a deposit will not only solve the problem it will eliminate almost every model from wanting to work with you.

If the shoot is important get a professional model from an agency, obviously by what happened the "model" you cast was not professional.  When looking for freelance models check references, it works for both models and photographers.

Mar 26 13 08:43 am Link

Photographer

ontherocks

Posts: 22610

Salem, Oregon, US

the interesting thing to me is i've never had a really young llama flake. but once they get out on their own in the world watch out.

but, yeah, i think some photographers are expecting llamas to be seasoned veterans of life and work and that's probably a bit unrealistic, at least for the youngsters.

Looknsee Photography wrote:
...  We like our llamas young, but we want the reliability of veterans with 15 years experience.  When dealing with young people, you sometimes have to expect people who are less reliable than you would like.  Sorry.

Mar 26 13 08:59 am Link

Photographer

Will Snizek Photography

Posts: 1387

Beckley, West Virginia, US

Generally in life, the majority of people aren't reliable or competent in what they do, so cancellations without notice from online models should be expected.  I've only had one model flake out on me but it worked out well because I got some good landscape photos that day.  I'm the type of person who is generally 15-45 minutes early for everything I do and never flake, but you can't expect that of the general population.

Mar 26 13 09:08 am Link

Photographer

ArtisticGlamour

Posts: 3846

Phoenix, Arizona, US

Warning signs:

1.) messages are limited to

Mar 26 13 09:08 am Link

Photographer

Rieni Otten

Posts: 193

Auxerre, Bourgogne, France

-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:
Rule #3: Always have a backup plan, even if it's only to settle down on the couch with a beer and a good book.

Hahahahaha, that's always my backup. When a model cancels, I laugh, turn on my TV, get my remote control, a couple of beers and a bag of chips.

Mar 26 13 09:41 am Link

Photographer

Rieni Otten

Posts: 193

Auxerre, Bourgogne, France

ArtisticGlamour wrote:
Here's the deal from my point of view...yes, it happens all the time here (if you let it). wink

This is what they say:
1.) My grandma died (again)
2.) I have to "work" at the last minute.
3.) My sister got into an accident.
4.) My boyfriend's car broke down.

lol I thought all this only happens to the models I work with :-)

Mar 26 13 09:43 am Link

Photographer

SitronStudio

Posts: 1064

Venice, Florida, US

I put no effort into a shoot with an MM model until they call and let me know they're on the way. Then I test lighting and start thinking about themes. If they're good I'll schedule a second shoot that is more involved. I consider the first a "test". That said, I just worked with an 18 year old that showed all the signs of being a flake, lived two hours away, and had no car or even license. They assured me they would get here somehow. Sure enough, he convinced his aunt and uncle to bring him. He showed up well prepared, and his aunt and uncle sat in the car in the driveway for 2 hours. Sometimes people surprise you.

Mar 26 13 10:02 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Jay Manne wrote:
that a professional model would have made the effort to cancel on his/her own.

But that's just it...you weren't working with a professional model. You were working with an attractive female who just wanted photos for an online portfolio.

That's the Catch-22. A professional model wouldn't need to arrange a TF* shoot for portfolio development. Only inexperienced, aspiring models need that service. And many, many aspiring models aren't going to treat a photo shoot with the same degree of importance as you do.

What you view as a commitment, many of the aspiring models view as something fun to fill their time...unless something more fun comes along (which is the majority of things in their lives).

Mar 26 13 10:13 am Link

Photographer

L A U B E N H E I M E R

Posts: 8791

Seattle, Washington, US

Jay Manne wrote:
As a photographer and one who runs a business involved in photography, I am perplexed as to the behavior or people in this business who treat appointments as if they don't exist. A new model approached me on MM, asking me to do her portfolio. In speaking with her I assessed she was a serious, motivated young lady who was looking for a quality photographer to do this shoot. We agreed on a date and time, about two weeks in advance, as my schedule permitted. As the date approached, about 5 days prior, I wrote her and wanted to consult with her about the shoot. When I didn't get a reply I wrote again..... She replied to me, less than 48  hours of the shoot, "I found another photographer, thanks."

Is it me or is this total garbage? I wrote her back, indicating that,, once she knew she was not going to keep the appointment she had an obligation to contact me so I could free my schedule. I should not have had to find this information out myself, that a professional model would have made the effort to cancel on his/her own. I further suggested she not do this to anyone else, lest she gain a "reputation" and that this behavior was bad karma... Her response..... "You are very unprofessional!" How disingenuous is that??????

This is a small business, we all interact with one another on a number of different fronts and word of a bad apple spreads fast. I know this incident will be out of my thoughts in another week, but I could have scheduled two other shoots in her time slot. I did the responsible thing by contacting her well prior to the shoot and admit I was very skeptical of her when she didn't respond right away.

Should I be pissed or what? My time is no less valuable than anyone else and nobody has a right to waste that time. She wasted it, while I will forgive, I will never forget her name... she's on MM, by the way.

if you run a photography business, why are you sharing this with the entire world? a simple google search brings up your name and this thread.

Mar 26 13 10:43 am Link

Photographer

Frank McDonough

Posts: 146

Boston, Massachusetts, US

This the first I've ever heard of this, I'm completely shocked.

Mar 26 13 10:56 am Link

Artist/Painter

MainePaintah

Posts: 1780

Saco, Maine, US

-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:
Rule #3: Always have a backup plan, even if it's only to settle down on the couch with a beer and a good book.

Damn! That's the BACKUP plan?

No wonder I never get anything done and my girlfriend is always yelling at me to get my butt off the couch and go to work!

Guess I'll go get a beer and think about all this!

Mar 26 13 10:57 am Link

Photographer

Tony Lawrence

Posts: 19225

Chicago, Illinois, US

ArtisticGlamour wrote:
Here's the deal from my point of view...yes, it happens all the time here (if you let it). wink

This is what they say:
1.) My grandma died (again)
2.) I have to "work" at the last minute.
3.) My sister got into an accident.
4.) My boyfriend's car broke down.
5.) I got a rash/sunburn.
etc...
etc...

THIS is what I believe really happened:
1.) My ass looks big today.
2.) Shit...I'm out of eyeliner.
3.) My face looks puffy today.
4.) I really want to go to the mall with my boyfriend today.
5.) Shit...I got a rash/sunburn.
etc.
etc.

The way I have found to avoid this (I have a ZERO cancellation rate, now) is to COMMUNICATE! You have to get the model "invested" in the shoot...and build up a comfort level with you AHEAD of the shoot. Talk about the concept together. Let her know that you don't expect "perfection". Get her excited about the shoot's concept. Collaborate!

You will find that the "personal involvement" and "comfort level" is inversely proportional to the number of last-minute cancellations.

Not to pick on you but the OP did communicate but the deal is.   He was asked too shoot.   Recently several MM models have tagged and PM me about shoots.   I respond and call and they go silent or set up days and no call, no show.   I don't call too confirm.   I don't try to get people 'invested' in the shoot because I feel that people do or don't do what they want.   If it works for you though.   A model is coming to Chicago in April and asked me to shoot some lingerie of her and a friend.   I provided my number only to hear back she'd let me know as she's gotten a huge response.   Don't ask me to shoot and I agree only to come with some bullshi& so I told her  not too write me or call.   I've met women at malls who I gave my card to who called and arrived early and excited about shoots vs. models from this site who can't be bothered to respond to paid offers.

So what should shooters do?   Don't invest money or mental energy in shoots that odds are won't occur.   Don't rent studio space, hire MUA, take off work or set up lights, etc. until the models are at your studio.   If you want two models for a project book five.   Get confirmation calls.   Don't call models to confirm.   Send one email too remind them.   No reply.   Move on.   This isn't to say you're ideal is wrong but is wayyyy more time and energy then I have patience for.   Another MM model hit me up and asked for any concepts I have.   I'm not playing the fifty message game either.   We agree on time, place, concept and you call to confirm or you don't.

Mar 26 13 11:30 am Link

Photographer

Robert Jewett

Posts: 2460

al-Marsā, Tunis, Tunisia

Jay Manne wrote:
As a photographer and one who runs a business involved in photography, I am perplexed as to the behavior or people in this business who treat appointments as if they don't exist. A new model approached me on MM, asking me to do her portfolio. In speaking with her I assessed she was a serious, motivated young lady who was looking for a quality photographer to do this shoot. We agreed on a date and time, about two weeks in advance, as my schedule permitted. As the date approached, about 5 days prior, I wrote her and wanted to consult with her about the shoot. When I didn't get a reply I wrote again..... She replied to me, less than 48  hours of the shoot, "I found another photographer, thanks."

Is it me or is this total garbage? I wrote her back, indicating that,, once she knew she was not going to keep the appointment she had an obligation to contact me so I could free my schedule. I should not have had to find this information out myself, that a professional model would have made the effort to cancel on his/her own. I further suggested she not do this to anyone else, lest she gain a "reputation" and that this behavior was bad karma... Her response..... "You are very unprofessional!" How disingenuous is that??????

This is a small business, we all interact with one another on a number of different fronts and word of a bad apple spreads fast. I know this incident will be out of my thoughts in another week, but I could have scheduled two other shoots in her time slot. I did the responsible thing by contacting her well prior to the shoot and admit I was very skeptical of her when she didn't respond right away.

Should I be pissed or what? My time is no less valuable than anyone else and nobody has a right to waste that time. She wasted it, while I will forgive, I will never forget her name... she's on MM, by the way.

Your response sounds almost as professional as her actions.

Mar 26 13 11:44 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

Tony Lawrence wrote:
This isn't to say you're ideal is wrong but is wayyyy more time and energy then I have patience for.   Another MM model hit me up and asked for any concepts I have.   I'm not playing the fifty message game either.   We agree on time, place, concept and you call to confirm or you don't.

+1.

I get the feeling very often that the concept of being a model is far more attractive to many young females, than is the actual modeling. Oh, how they love the back-and-forth communication...discussing, planning, talking about wardrobe and concepts and locations. THAT is modeling to many young females who call themselves models. But, beyond that? Actually show up at the shoot?

They love the word "model" as a Noun...not so much as a Verb.

I think it's great to motivate a team and get them excited about concepts. But I don't have the patience to hold anybody's hand and try to motivate them or get them invested...just to minimize the flake factor. It reminds me a bit too much of Child Psychology 101.

Mar 26 13 11:46 am Link

Photographer

Farenell Photography

Posts: 18130

Albany, New York, US

Loki Studio wrote:
A 50% deposit will quickly eliminate all bullshit.

& pretty much all work that'd come ones way.

Mar 26 13 11:53 am Link

Photographer

Herman Surkis

Posts: 8865

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

natural beauties of qld wrote:
Beware the pretty girl syndrome.

For a female, being pretty is a double-edged sword.  Being pretty gets doors opened that would otherwise be closed. 

However, the danger is that the pretty girl comes to think that all doors open for her as a matter of birthright and that that is the natural order of things, so she can safely ignore the conventions of civilised society like keeping her word, acting responsibly, etc.

Eventually, the real world catches up with the pretty girl because prettiness always fades, but that is probably a few years away for your example and the millions of others like her.  Nevertheless, in twenty years time, she will probably be divorced, unhappy, and wondering why.

Actually truth.

However, for a barely twenty something, 20 years down the road, is another lifetime, in someone else's life.

Mar 26 13 11:57 am Link

Photographer

Rick OBanion Photo

Posts: 1351

Saint Catharines-Niagara, Ontario, Canada

Get used to it. Book two models for the same day, hope one shows up. The fact you got notice was actually better than most do. The trouble with young models is...they are young.

Mar 26 13 12:02 pm Link

Photographer

Tony Lawrence

Posts: 19225

Chicago, Illinois, US

Michael Pandolfo wrote:

+1.

I get the feeling very often that the concept of being a model is far more attractive to many young females, than is the actual modeling. Oh, how they love the back-and-forth communication...discussing, planning, talking about wardrobe and concepts and locations. THAT is modeling to many young females who call themselves models. But, beyond that? Actually show up at the shoot?

They love the word "model" as a Noun...not so much as a Verb.

I think it's great to motivate a team and get them excited about concepts. But I don't have the patience to hold anybody's hand and try to motivate them or get them invested...just to minimize the flake factor. It reminds me a bit too much of Child Psychology 101.

Hi, Michael.   All the collaboration in the world isn't going too motivate someone who just changes her/his mind.
The OP was told by the model she had found someone else to shoot with and frankly, I wouldn't have called or written her again.   Several months ago I offered a paid shoot.   A pretty tall girl who had responded two years ago to a shoot replied.   We finally met.   Had a fun shoot.   We had lunch and parted and she hasn't been back on MM in months.   Who knows why.   Her living situation was iffy.   Lets be candid.   Most of the models here are students or young mothers or working their first job.   Their life is parties, hanging out with friends, hooking up and doing the things young people do.   They may like us and our work but the ideal of some free photos may just not be as appealing as it sounded when they wrote.   So instead of being mature they just don't reply anymore.

That's not a nice or professional thing to do but it is how it is.

Mar 26 13 12:32 pm Link

Photographer

AJ_In_Atlanta

Posts: 12835

Atlanta, Georgia, US

ArtisticGlamour wrote:
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Mar 26 13 12:40 pm Link