Forums > Off-Topic Discussion > Things that are said incorrectly so often......

Model

M A U I

Posts: 1587

Harare, Harare, Zimbabwe

.....that they are accepted as correct.

Not accepted by everyone, but generally speaking, by the masses:

"Crank Calls"
"I could care less"

Mar 30 13 05:29 pm Link

Photographer

NothingIsRealButTheGirl

Posts: 33526

Los Angeles, California, US

Mar 30 13 05:45 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Lauren Reynolds Makeup

Posts: 282

London, England, United Kingdom

Literally - people seem to not understand its meaning...

"I literally died of laughter". Well no, you didn't ACTUALLY die, did you? Well that's what you bloody well said!

Small things...

Mar 30 13 05:47 pm Link

Model

Julia Francesca

Posts: 2365

Maumee, Ohio, US

irregardless

Mar 30 13 05:54 pm Link

Photographer

Designit - Edward Olson

Posts: 1637

Eureka, California, US

M A U I wrote:
.....that they are accepted as correct.

Not accepted by everyone, but generally speaking, by the masses:

"Crank Calls"
"I could care less"

There is such a thing as a crank call. I expect that you think that people who say "crank call" invariably mean "prank call." Perhaps there are people who think they mean the same thing, especially after the show "Crank Yankers." A crank call is an antagonistic call meant to harass, but is not necessarily amusing to the caller.

Mar 30 13 05:54 pm Link

Photographer

Caradoc

Posts: 19740

Scottsdale, Arizona, US

"The proof is in the pudding." -> "The proof of the pudding is in the eating."

Mar 30 13 06:05 pm Link

Photographer

Top Level Studio

Posts: 3253

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Opposites mean the same now, which is confusing.  The next two sentences mean the same thing.

"This movie is based on a book."

"This movie is based off a book."

Another example:

"He's living on welfare."

"He's living off welfare."

In a different way, it's common to see statements like, "I have two choices, but I can decide what to do."

Quite possibly, the writer means, "I have two choices, but I can't decide what to do.", but it's impossible to be sure.  This happens a lot on some forums.  A person asks a question, but nobody can tell what the question is.

People just blithely type something and hit Send, without looking to see if what they just typed made any sense or not.  They may not actually be stupid, but they certainly give the impression of being stupid.

Mar 30 13 06:16 pm Link

Photographer

Jim Ball

Posts: 17228

Frontenac, Kansas, US

"Have your cake and eat it too."  Well, you can't eat your cake unless you have it first.

"Eat your cake and have it too" is the contradiction.

Mar 30 13 06:30 pm Link

Photographer

udor

Posts: 22364

New York, New York, US

"Would off" instead of "would have!" unless that's a version of English I don't know...

Mar 30 13 06:33 pm Link

Model

hygvhgvkhy

Posts: 2092

Chicago, Illinois, US

udor wrote:
"Would off" instead of "would have!" unless that's a version of English I don't know...

It's because we pronounce it like that, when saying wouldve.. I have no clue how the hell that happened though. Public schooling I suppose.

Mar 30 13 06:38 pm Link

Artist/Painter

DGCasey

Posts: 3006

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

"Hard road to hoe"

Not sure how many times I've heard that one.

It's "hard row to hoe" as in "this row in the garden is a tough row to hoe."

Mar 30 13 06:53 pm Link

Photographer

Kincaid Blackwood

Posts: 23403

Atlanta, Georgia, US

DGCasey wrote:
"Hard road to hoe"

Not sure how many times I've heard that one.

It's "hard row to hoe" as in "this row in the garden is a tough row to hoe."

No, no. The saying is totally "hard road to hoe."

It's a reference to prostitution ("hoe'n"). How some streets were more difficult to earn money on than others. The person who uses the phrase means that they have a night ahead of them filled with sore knees, lock jaw and only chump change to show for it. Living in Vegas, I'd think you could appreciate the phrase.


Glad I could clear this up for you.

Mar 30 13 07:25 pm Link

Artist/Painter

DGCasey

Posts: 3006

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
It's a reference to prostitution ("hoe'n"). How some streets were more difficult to earn money on than others. The person who uses the phrase means that they have a night ahead of them filled with sore knees, lock jaw and only chump change to show for it. Living in Vegas, I'd think you could appreciate the phrase.


Glad I could clear this up for you.

It's amazing how you could be so wrong about this.  The word "hoe" has been around a lot longer than Ebonics and it is a garden tool, a hand tool made to move and turn dirt in the garden.

Mar 30 13 07:39 pm Link

Photographer

Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

"comprised of" used to be bad English.  To comprise doesn't mean to compose.  It means to embrace, and one would not say "embraced of."  However, "comprised of" has now become so common, and used by classes of people we respect, that it has become standard English.  I'm still a fuddy-duddy about this, though, and so I don't say "comprised of."

Anyway, we never had any need for "comprised of" since we always had "composed of," and still do.

Mar 30 13 08:03 pm Link

Photographer

Commercial Works Photo

Posts: 265

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, US

Thanks for the tag.  Lets set up a time to shoot.

I am not sure if this is correct or not but I have never gotten a response.

Mar 30 13 08:11 pm Link

Photographer

Designit - Edward Olson

Posts: 1637

Eureka, California, US

Jim Ball wrote:
"Have your cake and eat it too."  Well, you can't eat your cake unless you have it first.

"Eat your cake and have it too" is the contradiction.

Whether you think the order is contradictory or not, the former is the original quote.

Mar 30 13 08:12 pm Link

Photographer

Kincaid Blackwood

Posts: 23403

Atlanta, Georgia, US

DGCasey wrote:
It's amazing how you could be so wrong about this.  The word "hoe" has been around a lot longer than Ebonics and it is a garden tool, a hand tool made to move and turn dirt in the garden.

Unlike you I don't judge people for their life choices. Nor do I refer to them as dirt.

Mar 30 13 08:16 pm Link

Photographer

Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

Jim Ball wrote:
"Have your cake and eat it too."  Well, you can't eat your cake unless you have it first.

"Eat your cake and have it too" is the contradiction.

Designit - Edward Olson wrote:
Whether you think the order is contradictory or not, the former is the original quote.

I used to puzzle about this.  Eventually, I concluded that the intended meaning was "He wants to eat his cake and yet still have it, i.e., uneaten."  That way, at least, it makes sense.

Mar 30 13 08:19 pm Link

Model

Tracii Taylor

Posts: 2176

Bordentown, New Jersey, US

DGCasey wrote:

It's amazing how you could be so wrong about this.  The word "hoe" has been around a lot longer than Ebonics and it is a garden tool, a hand tool made to move and turn dirt in the garden.

I Googled the phrase.  It's an old farming quote going back to at least 1818.

Mar 30 13 08:21 pm Link

Photographer

Kincaid Blackwood

Posts: 23403

Atlanta, Georgia, US

DGCasey wrote:
"Hard road to hoe"

Not sure how many times I've heard that one.

It's "hard row to hoe" as in "this row in the garden is a tough row to hoe."

Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
No, no. The saying is totally "hard road to hoe."

It's a reference to prostitution ("hoe'n"). How some streets were more difficult to earn money on than others. The person who uses the phrase means that they have a night ahead of them filled with sore knees, lock jaw and only chump change to show for it. Living in Vegas, I'd think you could appreciate the phrase.


Glad I could clear this up for you.

Before this devolves in to mind-numbing hilarity later tonight without me to clarify, the post above satirical in nature. I know precisely what the phrase means but apparently I'm way too convincing when I'm being facetious…

Mar 30 13 08:22 pm Link

Model

Tracii Taylor

Posts: 2176

Bordentown, New Jersey, US

Kincaid Blackwood wrote:

DGCasey wrote:
"Hard road to hoe"

Not sure how many times I've heard that one.

It's "hard row to hoe" as in "this row in the garden is a tough row to hoe."

Before this devolves in to mind-numbing hilarity later tonight without me to clarify, the post above satirical in nature. I know precisely what the phrase means but apparently I'm way too convincing when I'm being facetious…

It made me curious, so I Googled.  It would be more interesting if it were a hooker saying. hmm

Mar 30 13 08:27 pm Link

Body Painter

Monad Studios

Posts: 9791

Santa Rosa, California, US

"Tow the line"

"begs the question" when it's used to mean "raises the question"

Mar 30 13 08:28 pm Link

Photographer

Instinct Images

Posts: 22641

San Diego, California, US

Monad Studios wrote:
"Tow the line"

"begs the question" when it's used to mean "raises the question"

The first one is TOE the line

Mar 30 13 08:42 pm Link

Body Painter

Monad Studios

Posts: 9791

Santa Rosa, California, US

Instinct Images wrote:
The first one is TOE the line

^ Someone give this man a gold star!

Mar 30 13 08:46 pm Link

Model

M A U I

Posts: 1587

Harare, Harare, Zimbabwe

I ain't no


It's like thinking a double negative is still a negative

Mar 30 13 09:08 pm Link

guide forum

Photographer

Justin

Posts: 21892

Fort Collins, Colorado, US

"I paced back and forth."
You mean you went backwards first? No, you go forth and back. Ah, well.

"Keep a stiff upper lip."
Isn't it the lower lip that starts trembling?

"It fell between the cracks."
Thud. It landed on the board. If it had fallen through the cracks, it would've kept going.

"It's just between he and I."
People got schooled so hard on not misusing "me" that they overcompensate. No, it's the objective form, and the correct saying is "between him and me."

Mar 30 13 09:34 pm Link

Photographer

Chicchowmein

Posts: 14486

Palm Beach, Florida, US

Presley ONeil wrote:

It's because we pronounce it like that, when saying wouldve.. I have no clue how the hell that happened though. Public schooling I suppose.

I went to public school and I pronounce it like that.

I don't really know what they teach in schools anymore but it doesn't look like they teach spelling or grammar anymore.

My father's favorite pet peeve is the word forte.

You are not supposed to pronounce the e on forte if you are saying something is someone's forte but it is so commonly mispronounced that it has become the preferred "common" pronunciation.

It drives my father mad.

or·te 1  (fôrt, fôrt, frt)
n.
1. Something in which a person excels.
2. The strong part of a sword blade, between the middle and the hilt.
[French fort, from Old French, strong, from Latin fortis; see fort.]
Synonyms: forte1, métier, specialty, thing
These nouns denote something at which a person is particularly skilled: Writing fiction is her forte. The theater is his métier. The professor's specialty was the study of ancient languages. Mountain climbing is really my thing.


Usage Note: The word forte, coming from French fort, should properly be pronounced with one syllable, like the English word fort. Common usage, however, prefers the two-syllable pronunciation, (fôrt), which has been influenced possibly by the music term forte borrowed from Italian. In a recent survey a strong majority of the Usage Panel, 74 percent, preferred the two-syllable pronunciation. The result is a delicate situation; speakers who are aware of the origin of the word may wish to continue to pronounce it as one syllable but at an increasing risk of puzzling their listeners.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/forte

Mar 30 13 09:44 pm Link

Body Painter

Monad Studios

Posts: 9791

Santa Rosa, California, US

Justin wrote:
"I paced back and forth."
You mean you went backwards first? No, you go forth and back. Ah, well.

"Keep a stiff upper lip."
Isn't it the lower lip that starts trembling?

"It fell between the cracks."
Thud. It landed on the board. If it had fallen through the cracks, it would've kept going.

"It's just between he and I."
People got schooled so hard on not misusing "me" that they overcompensate. No, it's the objective form, and the correct saying is "between him and me."

I agree with you on "fell between the cracks" and "between he and I".

But "paced back and forth" and "stiff upper lips" are idioms.  Perhaps when read literally they are illogical, but it would be very peculiar for a native speaker of English to say "paced forth and back" or "stiff lower lip".

Next will you complain that people who die don't actually kick buckets?

Mar 30 13 09:49 pm Link

Photographer

Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

udor wrote:
"Would off" instead of "would have!" unless that's a version of English I don't know...

Presley ONeil wrote:
It's because we pronounce it like that, when saying wouldve.. I have no clue how the hell that happened though. Public schooling I suppose.

In common usage, it gets contracted even further to "a," pronounced "uh," as in "I woulda been there if I coulda got my car started."

Mar 30 13 10:27 pm Link

Body Painter

Monad Studios

Posts: 9791

Santa Rosa, California, US

Vivus Hussein Denuo wrote:

udor wrote:
"Would off" instead of "would have!" unless that's a version of English I don't know...

In common usage, it gets contracted even further to "a," pronounced "uh," as in "I woulda been there if I coulda got my car started."

I don't mind "woulda", but "would of" just sounds ignorant to me.

Mar 30 13 10:35 pm Link

Photographer

Michael Broughton

Posts: 2244

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

i can't stand when people say "whenever" when they mean "when".

Mar 31 13 12:17 am Link

Photographer

NothingIsRealButTheGirl

Posts: 33526

Los Angeles, California, US

"Wherefore art thou Romeo?" means "Why are you Romeo?"

Not "Where are you?"

Mar 31 13 12:32 am Link

Photographer

NothingIsRealButTheGirl

Posts: 33526

Los Angeles, California, US

Instinct Images wrote:
The first one is TOE the line

Love isn't always on time?

big_smile

Mar 31 13 12:32 am Link

Photographer

NothingIsRealButTheGirl

Posts: 33526

Los Angeles, California, US

http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/400x/22106886.jpg

The Merchant of Venice
Act 5, Scene I:

Portia:
"That light we see is burning in my hall.
How far that little candle throws his beams!
So shines a good deed in a naughty world."

Mar 31 13 12:37 am Link

Photographer

NothingIsRealButTheGirl

Posts: 33526

Los Angeles, California, US

"Short lived" pronounced with a short i like in 'kitten'

It is short live-d, like in 'live' nude girls.

Mar 31 13 12:39 am Link

Photographer

Velvet Paper Photo

Posts: 468

Lexington, Kentucky, US

"Indefinitely" is not interchangeable with "definitely."

Mar 31 13 12:48 am Link

Photographer

Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

The Space Cowboy wrote:
"Wherefore art thou Romeo?" means "Why are you Romeo?"

Not "Where are you?"

In a somewhat similar vein, "whence" means "from where," not "where."  So, when people say, as they commonly do, "From whence does he come?" they are actually saying "From from where does he come?"  That's two "froms," one of which is unneeded.

So, if you aim to sound erudite by saying "whence," then omit the "from."  You will actually be erudite.

On the other hand, the phrase "from whence," however incorrect, duplicative, and illogical, is ancient.  It is found in the Bible, Shakespeare, Dryden and Dickens.  "Hence, if you say "from whence," you'll be in good company.  smile

Mar 31 13 12:48 am Link

Photographer

Snyder Studios

Posts: 199

Los Angeles, California, US

Me, Joe, and Sally went to the store.....

It's  Joe, Sally, and I went to the store....

I rarely see the correct usage anymore. It saddens me.

Mar 31 13 12:50 am Link

Photographer

Vivus Hussein Denuo

Posts: 64209

New York, New York, US

Velvet Paper Photo wrote:
"Indefinitely" is not interchangeable with "definitely."

On the other hand, "inflammable" is interchangeable with "flammable."  Go figger.  smile

Mar 31 13 12:52 am Link

Photographer

NothingIsRealButTheGirl

Posts: 33526

Los Angeles, California, US

Vivus Hussein Denuo wrote:
On the other hand, "inflammable" is interchangeable with "flammable."  Go figger.  smile

It is now. Wasn't always.

Mar 31 13 01:01 am Link