Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > How to get this visual style

Retoucher

Han Sam

Posts: 149

Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

Hi Wizard,
I see this look for a while and I can't find the answer. It's look like some adjust Highpass technique or Lucis but i don't success on my test.
I understand that it is associated with many steps: Split, D & B, local contrast ... but is there any way to create the same effect? Hope you give me some advice...
Thks smile

http://www.keatleyphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Ferran_Adria_0112.jpg

http://www.keatleyphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Ferran_Adria_0117.jpg

http://www.keatleyphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Wexley_0211_FINAL.jpg

http://fadedandblurred.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Crisman-4-600x432.jpg

http://fadedandblurred.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/crisman-25-600x441.jpg

http://i498.photobucket.com/albums/rr345/hotsteveo/inspiration/Screenshot2010-10-14at50120PM.png

Oct 18 13 09:58 am Link

Retoucher

Han Sam

Posts: 149

Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

I also want to know, what is "edges contrast bump avoiding small textures" technique? Thks so much.

Oct 18 13 10:21 am Link

Retoucher

Peano

Posts: 4106

Lynchburg, Virginia, US

Han Sam wrote:
It's look like some adjust Highpass technique or Lucis but i don't success on my test.

Can you show your test, before and after?

Oct 18 13 10:36 am Link

Photographer

Dumas Photography

Posts: 869

Allen, Texas, US

I too would love to hear someone explain how this is achieved.

Oct 18 13 12:51 pm Link

Photographer

Don Garrett

Posts: 4446

Escondido, California, US

The way I would achieve this look is to do some tonemapping, and blend the image with some Photoshopping, and NIK sharpener. I use many layers, so I don't get noticeable artifacts from one particular technique or another. I like lots of local contrast, (like what I see in the viewfinder). I like a LITTLE more saturation than I get with an unretouched image, and I like sharpness, but hate some of the sharpening artifacts that I see in some images.
  Visual punch, or impact, is what I like to call it. I think the images in my portfolio are exemplary, and have something in common with the images that you have presented.
  What it really comes down to, though, is CONTROL. If you have a vision, you should be able to use the tools effectively, and achieve that vision.
  The tools I like to use are: Photomatix, Photoshop, and NIK sharpener. In Photoshop, I like curves, (For total tone and contrast control). Other tools are levels, the paintbrush, a judicious use of Shadow - Highlight, and a few others. I like for each image to span the whole available range, (from 0-255), but I hate "clumps" of either.
-Don

Oct 18 13 01:08 pm Link

Photographer

Tulack

Posts: 634

Albuquerque, New Mexico, US

Good team, good lighting, 20000 dollars camera would do 90% of the job. Just need minor adjustment in LR or Capture Pro. There is no Highpass. It's 40 mpix 4490 x 3364 mm  redused to 675x900 mm

Oct 18 13 06:45 pm Link

Photographer

cwwmbm

Posts: 464

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Tulack wrote:
Good team, good lighting, 20000 dollars camera would do 90% of the job. Just need minor adjustment in LR or Capture Pro. There is no Highpass. It's 40 mpix 4490 x 3364 mm  redused to 675x900 mm

I think there's more to it than that.

Half of these photos are from Chris Crisman, and I had an interesting conversation with his retoucher (more like exchange of couple emails). She normally spends about 8 hours per photo AFTER good lighting and 5-digits camera did its job.

8 hours per photo when it's not in the studio though, probably it's less than that for the studio portraits.

I'm guessing she isn't relying on plugins and does majority of the job manually.

Oct 18 13 07:08 pm Link

Photographer

KMP

Posts: 4823

Houston, Texas, US

The first 2 shots can be achieved a lot by the right lighting. As you move down the examples, it seems to me that more post work is involved.  I just did a shoot of professionals with one medium soft box and a small strip light as  a kicker and the end result look very close to the top 2 shots even before any post work was done.

I'm always amazed what some of the folks on here can do in post work.

Oct 18 13 07:22 pm Link

Photographer

Tulack

Posts: 634

Albuquerque, New Mexico, US

It depends what photo used for. If photo retouched for 8 hours, it's most likely whole day shooting, 5-10 people team. Renting, lawyers, airplane tickets, hotels etc.

Oct 18 13 07:24 pm Link

Photographer

Robert Randall

Posts: 13842

Chicago, Illinois, US

Tulack wrote:
It depends what photo used for. If photo retouched for 8 hours, it's most likely whole day shooting, 5-10 people team. Renting, lawyers, airplane tickets, hotels etc.

Am I the only one that doesn't understand the meaning of this post?

Oct 18 13 08:01 pm Link

Photographer

Tulack

Posts: 634

Albuquerque, New Mexico, US

Robert Randall wrote:
Am I the only one that doesn't understand the meaning of this post?

I know, Hah.

Oct 18 13 08:24 pm Link

Photographer

pellepiano

Posts: 2282

Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

The OP post shows a lot of different styles, but for the last one there is a thread here on MM with examples on how to change their appearence ...

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=641182

Like going from ... to .... using coloring and dodge and burn to change the original levels of light and dark a little.

http://www.lutzimages.com/thread_images/mm_portraitbrad2.jpg

Oct 19 13 02:10 am Link

Photographer

Jakov Markovic

Posts: 1128

Belgrade, Central Serbia, Serbia

It's just good ol' patience and step by step. No general "one click and it's done".

Oct 19 13 05:44 am Link

Retoucher

Han Sam

Posts: 149

Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

pellepiano wrote:
The OP post shows a lot of different styles, but for the last one there is a thread here on MM with examples on how to change their appearence ...

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=641182

Like going from ... to .... using coloring and dodge and burn to change the original levels of light and dark a little.

Thks all of you. I found some good uselful advice in:
http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=900258
http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=641182

Now it's time to practice... smile

Oct 24 13 10:48 pm Link

Photographer

Olivier Cuny

Posts: 6

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

Oct 28 13 02:42 pm Link

Photographer

cwwmbm

Posts: 464

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Olivier Cuny wrote:
I believe this style is very close to Amy Dresser style:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kG31bW0yka4

http://web.archive.org/web/200708171758 … yTutorial/

You realize that the second link leads to some place without any images right?

Oct 28 13 07:55 pm Link

Photographer

Aleks Palichleb

Posts: 11

Elmhurst, New York, US

Tulack wrote:
Good team, good lighting, 20000 dollars camera would do 90% of the job. Just need minor adjustment in LR or Capture Pro. There is no Highpass. It's 40 mpix 4490 x 3364 mm  redused to 675x900 mm

Yep. MOST likely a medium format camera, amazing lighting, and THEN probably a really good D&B + Multiple different curves.

I was told professionals don't use "High Pass".

Nov 03 13 10:27 am Link

Photographer

Thinking Inside The Box

Posts: 278

Diamond Bar, California, US

Robert Randall wrote:

Tulack wrote:
It depends what photo used for. If photo retouched for 8 hours, it's most likely whole day shooting, 5-10 people team. Renting, lawyers, airplane tickets, hotels etc.

Am I the only one that doesn't understand the meaning of this post?

No.

Jakov Markovic wrote:
It's just good ol' patience and step by step. No general "one click and it's done".

Nobody suggested 'one click and it's done'. Could you share the good ol' step-by-step? If it's as simple as you indicate, I'm sure we would benefit from your tips.

Nov 03 13 10:50 pm Link

Photographer

Sean C

Posts: 34

Plano, Texas, US

Aleks Palichleb wrote:
... I was told professionals don't use "High Pass".

I wouldn't say that's necessarily true. I think that would be like saying professionals don't use Nikon. Each photographer has their own style and own way of doing things, amateur or professional.

Nov 03 13 11:12 pm Link