Forums > Hair, Makeup & Styling > Makeup Artists who are asked to do hair last min.

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

Fellow Makeup Artists, I'm sure you've all experienced this at some point or another in your career - when you are booked for a MAKEUP job, & the client throws in a hair-styling request last minute. I've been coming across this way too often lately. I'll get booked for a shoot to only do makeup, we'll exchange emails, discuss looks, rates, etc and then a day or two before the shoot I find out that some "light hair-styling" would also be needed.

1) I wasn't made aware of this, therefore only negotiated a makeup rate
2) I am not there to do favors even if it is "light" hair. It's a job
3) Sometimes I am told the day of, thus I am not prepared with hair equipment

Either way, I am so over the whole notion of "if you're a makeup artist, then you must also know how to do hair." I don't mind doing hair if I'm told ahead of time. I just hate having it thrown at me last minute, and hoping they could just slide it in there without properly compensating me. How do you guys approach situations like these? Do you let it slide and just do it or let the client know you will have to renegotiate your rate?

Jan 03 14 11:11 pm Link

Photographer

KungPaoChic

Posts: 3084

West Palm Beach, Florida, US

Susan Zeytuntsyan wrote:
Fellow Makeup Artists, I'm sure you've all experienced this at some point or another in your career - when you are booked for a MAKEUP job, & the client throws in a hair-styling request last minute. I've been coming across this way too often lately. I'll get booked for a shoot to only do makeup, we'll exchange emails, discuss looks, rates, etc and then a day or two before the shoot I find out that some "light hair-styling" would also be needed.

1) I wasn't made aware of this, therefore only negotiated a makeup rate
2) I am not there to do favors even if it is "light" hair. It's a job
3) Sometimes I am told the day of, thus I am not prepared with hair equipment

Either way, I am so over the whole notion of "if you're a makeup artist, then you must also know how to do hair." I don't mind doing hair if I'm told ahead of time. I just hate having it thrown at me last minute, and hoping they could just slide it in there without properly compensating me. How do you guys approach situations like these? Do you let it slide and just do it or let the client know you will have to renegotiate your rate?

charge more

Jan 03 14 11:44 pm Link

Photographer

terrysphotocountry

Posts: 4147

Rochester, New York, US

Its there way of getting something for nothing.

Jan 04 14 02:59 am Link

Makeup Artist

MakeUp By CC

Posts: 303

Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

Charge more...
Personally I don't even really bring my hair stuff unless it's been agreed beforehand. Well maybe spray and a comb, oil, water bottle to fight strays but no heating tools or anything unless it's been agreed on

Jan 04 14 03:37 am Link

Makeup Artist

Lindsey Ordze

Posts: 29

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

I always carry a very minimal hair kit.  Travel sized products, travel sized straightening iron, a brush and comb, couple elastics and bobby pins.  I do this in case the model or client got their hair done at a salon and getting dressed or even just the wind outside has slightly messed up their hair.  This is part of my make-up case.  No one knows it's there, but that way a couple strays don't ruin the whole photo.

I drive so I am able to keep my full hair kit in my van and pull it out if needed.  If they say the day of the shoot that they need me to do hair, I wont agree to anything until I've seen the model.  If she comes in and needs full styling, then I require you pay me.  If her hair is 90% done and I can easily brush it out and hair spray it in under two minutes, then I will tell them I am willing to do that for free, anything else requires me to be paid.  Basically, if I can do the touch up in under 5 minutes, I won't jeopardize the relationship with the photographer, client, team.  But I make a mental note for any future shoots.  If it requires real styling, then yes I deserve to be compensated and will negotiate rates on set.  They will usually pay me rather than wasting valuable time negotiating.

I also always ask what the plan is for hair when discussing a shoot.  Back when I took transit, if I asked about hair and wasn't told they would like me to do it, I didn't bring my full kit, just that travel one.  And if I am not able to do the hair they want, I don't feel bad about it as I already asked about hair.  I follow the same rules as above, just with the styling options being cut down as I only have a minimal kit with me.

If they tell me ahead of time, even just a day or two before the shoot, I negotiate rates.  Usually they pay me, sometimes the model does their own hair and I am still prepared to do a quick touch up.

I also negotiate time.  If you booked me for 30 minutes for makeup, then you want me to do hair as well, I want the extra time to do hair.

Jan 04 14 04:32 am Link

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

terrysphotocountry wrote:
Its there way of getting something for nothing.

Agreed. It's as if I am obligated to also do hair if I am getting hired for makeup.

Jan 04 14 10:03 am Link

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

MakeUp By CC wrote:
Charge more...
Personally I don't even really bring my hair stuff unless it's been agreed beforehand. Well maybe spray and a comb, oil, water bottle to fight strays but no heating tools or anything unless it's been agreed on

That's how I am. I never carry any hair tools unless it has been discussed that I am also doing hair and getting paid for it. But I've been getting "surprises" like these too often now. I'll get done with makeup and then the client throws in the "soooo, we were thinking to straighten the model's hair.." And me not having a hair kit on hand somehow makes me look like the bad guy. Like I was obligated to do her hair for free.

Jan 04 14 10:12 am Link

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

ThatMUA wrote:
I always carry a very minimal hair kit.  Travel sized products, travel sized straightening iron, a brush and comb, couple elastics and bobby pins.  I do this in case the model or client got their hair done at a salon and getting dressed or even just the wind outside has slightly messed up their hair.  This is part of my make-up case.  No one knows it's there, but that way a couple strays don't ruin the whole photo.

I drive so I am able to keep my full hair kit in my van and pull it out if needed.  If they say the day of the shoot that they need me to do hair, I wont agree to anything until I've seen the model.  If she comes in and needs full styling, then I require you pay me.  If her hair is 90% done and I can easily brush it out and hair spray it in under two minutes, then I will tell them I am willing to do that for free, anything else requires me to be paid.  Basically, if I can do the touch up in under 5 minutes, I won't jeopardize the relationship with the photographer, client, team.  But I make a mental note for any future shoots.  If it requires real styling, then yes I deserve to be compensated and will negotiate rates on set.  They will usually pay me rather than wasting valuable time negotiating.

I also always ask what the plan is for hair when discussing a shoot.  Back when I took transit, if I asked about hair and wasn't told they would like me to do it, I didn't bring my full kit, just that travel one.  And if I am not able to do the hair they want, I don't feel bad about it as I already asked about hair.  I follow the same rules as above, just with the styling options being cut down as I only have a minimal kit with me.

If they tell me ahead of time, even just a day or two before the shoot, I negotiate rates.  Usually they pay me, sometimes the model does their own hair and I am still prepared to do a quick touch up.

I also negotiate time.  If you booked me for 30 minutes for makeup, then you want me to do hair as well, I want the extra time to do hair.

I can easily carry my kit in my car too. Absolutely not a problem. My problem is the deceptiveness. And it's sort of a double-edged sword because you don't want to jeopardize those relationships and look unprofessional on set, however you also deserve to be properly compensated and made aware of the FULL plan for looks.

Jan 04 14 10:17 am Link

Makeup Artist

Lauren Reynolds Makeup

Posts: 282

London, England, United Kingdom

Always clarify exactly what the job entails before giving your rate - I ask specifically if any hairstyling is needed and haven't really had issues since I started doing this smile

Jan 06 14 11:58 am Link

Hair Stylist

Angel Graves

Posts: 2358

Fort Collins, Colorado, US

I never take on a booking without asking a bunch of questions first.  If they're offering me $XX dollars & want hair, makeup & AD then I shoot them back $XXX-XXXX & if that's not feasible I pass.  Just because I am a hairstylist, makeup artist, wardrobe stylist & qualified art director does not mean that I will do ALL of those jobs for a rate of 1 of those jobs.  But I agree, you all should carry something in your kits to be able to do touch ups on set.  Surely it's in your own best interest to be able to fix strays or wind tousled hair?  As far as creating an elaborate Elizabethan hair do on the per face budget being offered for makeup by most of the people trying to pull this on you?  I wonder why you're even accepting those types of bookings?  If someone's asked you to do some light hair on a half day rate budget, I don't think that's asking too much.  Light hair tends to be just that, a pony tail or a braid maybe some products involved but nothing requiring a hot tool.  Once you're bringing out the hot tools, the extension hairs, the filler hairs. . . Then you start upping your rates or suggesting they bring in a proper hair person to do the job.
Just my .02

Jan 06 14 12:25 pm Link

Model

K I C K H A M

Posts: 14636

Los Angeles, California, US

Lauren Reynolds Makeup wrote:
Always clarify exactly what the job entails before giving your rate - I ask specifically if any hairstyling is needed and haven't really had issues since I started doing this smile

This seems to be the best route.

I think some people are trying to get cheaper work, and some just really aren't thinking.

Not that them not thinking should be your problem, but there are ways to avoid it much of the time. smile

Jan 06 14 12:29 pm Link

Photographer

J O H N A L L A N

Posts: 10316

Santa Ana, California, US

It's my experience that the majority of makeup artists do light-hair. If you are offended by this expectation and/or don't want to touch hair, then I'd suggest being clear about this in your engagement letter/email.
Having said that, If I'm expecting light hair, I'm always going to say that at the beginning of the booking process (not spring it on someone at the shoot). I've had zero push-back on this. However, I've had artists ask for my definition of "light hair" - which also isn't maybe a bad thing for you to do.
I'm also probably not going to have a dedicated hair stylist on set unless the look is hair-centric or styled to the degree that the hair is integral to the styling. For instance, I have an editorial submission project coming up where there will be a dedicated hair stylist because it's very styled. On the other hand for agency tests I rarely have a dedicated hair stylist because it's excessive for a nice natural look, even though the hair needs to be lightly styled.

At any rate, it's all about communication in the end. If you don't want to do hair - make that part of your communication.

Jan 06 14 12:42 pm Link

Photographer

Capitol City Boudoir

Posts: 756

Sacramento, California, US

When I hire a MUA, I hire her for a set amount of time on the set, typically 2 hours for a 1 hour shoot.  I pay her a fee for the 2 hours and EXPECT that she'll do whatever is necessary, including hair during that time.  Sometimes, she works for 45-60 minutes, other times, she's busy non-stop. Most times, it's a single look with "adjustments" during the shoot.

If the shoot goes over, I pay extra in 15 min increments.  Right now, I'm paying $50 per hour or $100 for the 2-hour shoot.  I have several MUA's that I work with on a regular basis.

I pass this expense on to the client that I'm shooting. I only provide this service to clients that are willing to pay for it.

Jan 06 14 01:04 pm Link

Model

K I C K H A M

Posts: 14636

Los Angeles, California, US

Capitol City Boudoir wrote:
When I hire a MUA, I hire her for a set amount of time on the set, typically 2 hours for a 1 hour shoot.  I pay her a fee for the 2 hours and EXPECT that she'll do whatever is necessary, including hair during that time.  Sometimes, she works for 45-60 minutes, other times, she's busy non-stop. Most times, it's a single look with "adjustments" during the shoot.

If the shoot goes over, I pay extra in 15 min increments.  Right now, I'm paying $50 per hour or $100 for the 2-hour shoot.  I have several MUA's that I work with on a regular basis.

I pass this expense on to the client that I'm shooting. I only provide this service to clients that are willing to pay for it.

I'm a little confused. Why do you expect that a makeup artist will do hair?

Not every makeup artist is a hair stylist.

If I get paid to model for 2 hours, I am generally getting paid to MODEL for 2 hours rather than do things not in my job description.

It makes sense if this is all laid out before the shoot, but if it's something you drop on them, I would reconsider your methods.

Jan 06 14 01:11 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

Angel Graves wrote:
I never take on a booking without asking a bunch of questions first.  If they're offering me $XX dollars & want hair, makeup & AD then I shoot them back $XXX-XXXX & if that's not feasible I pass.  Just because I am a hairstylist, makeup artist, wardrobe stylist & qualified art director does not mean that I will do ALL of those jobs for a rate of 1 of those jobs.  But I agree, you all should carry something in your kits to be able to do touch ups on set.  Surely it's in your own best interest to be able to fix strays or wind tousled hair?  As far as creating an elaborate Elizabethan hair do on the per face budget being offered for makeup by most of the people trying to pull this on you?  I wonder why you're even accepting those types of bookings?  If someone's asked you to do some light hair on a half day rate budget, I don't think that's asking too much.  Light hair tends to be just that, a pony tail or a braid maybe some products involved but nothing requiring a hot tool.  Once you're bringing out the hot tools, the extension hairs, the filler hairs. . . Then you start upping your rates or suggesting they bring in a proper hair person to do the job.
Just my .02

Agreed. I am ok with touching up strays, putting the hair up, etc but I have come across far too many shoots where the flat iron or curler is asked to be put out, without it being discussed prior. They want that all-for-one package, so I have been refusing a lot more work simply because of that reason.

Jan 06 14 08:15 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

K I C K H A M wrote:

I'm a little confused. Why do you expect that a makeup artist will do hair?

Not every makeup artist is a hair stylist.

If I get paid to model for 2 hours, I am generally getting paid to MODEL for 2 hours rather than do things not in my job description.

It makes sense if this is all laid out before the shoot, but if it's something you drop on them, I would reconsider your methods.

Completely agree with you. While it may be in one's best interest as a makeup artist to also be knowledgeable in hair, you cannot assume & expect that the artist you've hired is competent at both. If it is discussed prior to the shoot with the artist and he/she is ok with the arrangement, then that is fine. But if you spring it on during the shoot, then I definitely see a problem in that.

Jan 06 14 08:30 pm Link

Photographer

GER Photography

Posts: 7939

Imperial, California, US

Just tell them " iss no my yob  meng " a little " Chicko and the man " humor, sorry!:-))

Jan 06 14 08:45 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Susan Zeytuntsyan

Posts: 21

Los Angeles, California, US

Lol smile

Jan 06 14 10:08 pm Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

I rarely get a request to do makeup that doesn't require hair as well.  I normally just assume I'm doing hair.  I personally charge for my time, not for what I do with that time...

Jan 07 14 12:05 am Link

Makeup Artist

MUA Janine

Posts: 237

Oakland, California, US

Susan Zeytuntsyan wrote:
Fellow Makeup Artists, I'm sure you've all experienced this at some point or another in your career - when you are booked for a MAKEUP job, & the client throws in a hair-styling request last minute. I've been coming across this way too often lately. I'll get booked for a shoot to only do makeup, we'll exchange emails, discuss looks, rates, etc and then a day or two before the shoot I find out that some "light hair-styling" would also be needed.

1) I wasn't made aware of this, therefore only negotiated a makeup rate
2) I am not there to do favors even if it is "light" hair. It's a job
3) Sometimes I am told the day of, thus I am not prepared with hair equipment

Either way, I am so over the whole notion of "if you're a makeup artist, then you must also know how to do hair." I don't mind doing hair if I'm told ahead of time. I just hate having it thrown at me last minute, and hoping they could just slide it in there without properly compensating me. How do you guys approach situations like these? Do you let it slide and just do it or let the client know you will have to renegotiate your rate?

A lot of photographers, models, stylists, etc etc assume that MUAs can do both since...well a lot can do both...or at the very least do light hair work.

Maybe add that in your initial email, it could be something as simple as "will you also be in need of light hair styling?" if they say no. Then don't bring your tools. If they say yes, then add that into your fee.

Jan 07 14 12:15 am Link

Makeup Artist

Carmen Make up and Hair

Posts: 321

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Mary wrote:
I rarely get a request to do makeup that doesn't require hair as well.  I normally just assume I'm doing hair.  I personally charge for my time, not for what I do with that time...

This. In the Toronto Market you are expected to be able to do both. You won't survive if you can't. Don't like it? Your team will find some one who does. It's as simple as that.

I charge half and full day rates and what I do during that time is up to my client. The only time I charge separately for hair is bridal, and in that instance I always travel with my hair kit just in case. Often girls will show up and decide they want hair - no complaints here - extra money for me!

Jan 08 14 08:21 am Link

Makeup Artist

Little Tumi FX

Posts: 43

New York, New York, US

You must charge extra not just for the extra service but also for bringing in another kit. You can give them a high price point to begin with (always start the highest) and then tell them you can be flexible within their budget so that way you won't under charge. But definitely charge extra whether it's light hairstyling or something real intricate. It is will work and it is still another kit.

Jan 15 14 10:10 am Link

Photographer

the lonely photographer

Posts: 1887

Beverly Hills, California, US

I ll learn to do on set makeup and hair. Never know when you get a flat tire, and AAA won't come.  Why be helpless?

Jan 15 14 10:58 am Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

Little Tumi FX wrote:
You must charge extra not just for the extra service but also for bringing in another kit. You can give them a high price point to begin with (always start the highest) and then tell them you can be flexible within their budget so that way you won't under charge. But definitely charge extra whether it's light hairstyling or something real intricate. It is will work and it is still another kit.

You need to understand the client before trying to negotiate....some clients are turned off by this tactic and you're competing with a very large pool of artists that do both makeup and hair for a set price.... I'm afraid you are walking away from a lot of great jobs by doing this.

When someone values their time more than money.... don't waste it trying to negotiate....

Jan 15 14 09:59 pm Link

Photographer

Fred Greissing

Posts: 6412

Los Angeles, California, US

Little Tumi FX wrote:
You can give them a high price point to begin with (always start the highest) and then tell them you can be flexible within their budget so that way you won't under charge.

If you quote a price and then tell them that you will be flexible  within their budget.... well their budget will automatically shrink.

What is the point of quoting a price and immediately saying you will lower it?

Quote your price and leave it at that. If they really want you they will always negotiate.

Jan 15 14 10:19 pm Link

Photographer

Fred Greissing

Posts: 6412

Los Angeles, California, US

Mary wrote:
.... I'm afraid you are walking away from a lot of great jobs by doing this.....

How is it a great job if it does not pay for the work done.

Doing great hair and great makeup requires way more work and above all requires shifting gear/working mode/etc.

It's like asking a photographer to shoot two jobs for the price of one.

Jan 15 14 10:25 pm Link

Makeup Artist

Heather J M

Posts: 718

London, England, United Kingdom

I charge for my time not per face/per skillset. Like Mary. I don't reduce my price if I'm hired to only do one thing. Here in the UK, at least with those of us who do film/tv/commercial/promo work the norm is for artists to do both.

Jan 16 14 02:30 am Link

guide forum

Makeup Artist

Mary

Posts: 7168

Coronado, California, US

Fred Greissing wrote:
How is it a great job if it does not pay for the work done.

Doing great hair and great makeup requires way more work and above all requires shifting gear/working mode/etc.

It's like asking a photographer to shoot two jobs for the price of one.

I never said to work for less.... You make your day rate a good one and you keep it there.  There's no need to start adding fees when it's standard for an artist in the area to do both makeup and hair.....  It is standard in most areas (with the exception of fashion and bridal)  that the artist does makeup and hair ..... we generally charge a day rate...even if I show up and just powder an athlete, the pay is the same because they're taking me off the market for the day.

Your above analogy doesn't work for me....  I see it more like....  I hire a photographer to shoot my ad..... if it requires he bring a lens he doesn't normally carry with him, I expect him to bring it for whatever the job is quoted as...If he or she starts nickle and dimeing me me for stuff another photographer wouldn't I'm going to pass on that photographer (all other things fairly equal)

Jan 16 14 08:39 am Link

Model

Ida Saint-Luc

Posts: 406

Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

I've seen this as a model for sure. Either the MUA does hair or is expected to do some kind of hair. If a MUA is booked, I'll always ask if she can do hair too or if I should bring hair supplies and do it myself. The other day I was under the impression (based on what the photographer said) that this poor MUA was doing my hair as well. She was awkward and nonplussed when I brought it up, so I just told her I'd do the hair myself and not to worry about it.

I guess between the model and the MUA basic hair tends to get done, which is why the photographer often doesn't bother to factor it in, unfortunately.

Jan 16 14 09:08 am Link

Photographer

1472

Posts: 1059

Pembroke Pines, Florida, US

I've been guilty of this once or twice , relying on the model to have a handle on her hair but nope. Then having to ask make up to do light hair. Most of the time it is negotiated in the beginning.

I would say charge more and try to be as clear as possible all up front , don't say I don't do hair tell them you do it for an additional fee.

Jan 16 14 09:15 am Link

Photographer

Thomas Van Dyke

Posts: 1768

Washington, District of Columbia, US

the lonely photographer wrote:
I ll learn to do on set makeup and hair. Never know when you get a flat tire, and AAA won't come.  Why be helpless?

From your BIO

I bought  a mannequin...

Trust it was a hair mannequin... it's how I learned hair... along with paying a gifted stylist in my market to train me... That said, it is not my fav, always burn my fingers with my hot tools... better me than the talent... lol  seriously hair is not easy, takes considerable time/effort to master in as there are so many different textures, far more variation than with skin textures for makeup... there are compelling reasons cosmetologist are required 1500+ plus hours to sit for their exam...

However there are workarounds... i.e. necessity is the mother of invention...
In the following examples the hair stylist was 1. late 2. cancelled or 3. I didn't have the time to do both makeup and hair then turn around and shoot the session... seriously...

Stylist was late so we had fun...

Stylist Cancelled so we had fun... 

I didn't have time to do hair so we had fun

Yep these are all editorial in nature...
For commercial always wise to have a tenured hair stylist on set...

enough said...

Jan 16 14 09:22 am Link

Makeup Artist

Imagevixen

Posts: 13

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Personally I wouldn't want my makeup work on a face that didn't have incredible hair.
I am not willing to compromise the quality of my look because I don't "feel' like doing hair or haven't been asked before hand.

I do however do ALL of the hairstyling including mens facial hair grooming for most of my shoots.

As a professional shoot artist you should know how to do hair AS WELL AS nail grooming and be prepared as the entire look will reflect the quality of your work.

It is very important to have great and very direct communication and shoot planning and preparedness.  Ask what the expectations are and be clear on what you offer and you will avoid that resentful feeling.

You can also charge an on location "touch up fee" that you make clear coming on set or when asked for 'extra' touch up work.  If its something that bothers you address it before it can happen.

Cheers and happy blending!

Jan 16 14 09:37 pm Link