Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > How to achieve this tone ?

Photographer

Bertrand Noel

Posts: 3

Paris, Île-de-France, France

Hello,

Do you guys know how to achieve this tone ?

Do you think is just by using Gradient Map with blend mode ? Or Hue/Saturation with colorize ?

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4OyS … nplTzdhZVE

I'm having a hard time trying to get that toning correctly but it wasn't so good.

Thank you for your help.

Mar 20 17 08:14 am Link

Retoucher

anchev

Posts: 794

Sofia, Sofija grad, Bulgaria

Bertrand Noel wrote:
Hello,

Do you guys know how to achieve this tone ?

Do you think is just by using Gradient Map with blend mode ? Or Hue/Saturation with colorize ?

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4OyS … nplTzdhZVE

I'm having a hard time trying to get that toning correctly but it wasn't so good.

Thank you for your help.

As in many similar threads - it matters where you start from. If you show your input image, someone may be able to help. Alternately you may try to reverse engineer the toning by degrading the image, making it as close as possible to your photo and then invert the process. Watch the neutrals, the skin tones (things you have some idea about) and work from there.

Mar 20 17 08:57 am Link

Photographer

Thomas Van Dyke

Posts: 2964

Washington, District of Columbia, US

Bertrand Noel wrote:
Do you think is just by using Gradient Map with blend mode ? Or Hue/Saturation with colorize ?

Bertrand it appears you are on the right track with this enchanting image in your book...

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/04/50e9721cd32b9.jpg

My compliments...

That said I find using a Selective Color Adjustment Layer to get the effect I'm after then reduce the opacity to taste...

And please accept an apology for the initial reply to your query...
Sadly it seems that Retouchers once they have achieved commercial success are rather unwilling to assist newly emerging talent... Possibly George may rethink his initial post and offer actual applied wisdom/methodology  to the mix... I certainly would like to see another retoucher with tenure share their thoughts here...

Hope this helps or is at least food for thought...
I wish you well Bertrand...

Mar 20 17 11:33 am Link

Retoucher

anchev

Posts: 794

Sofia, Sofija grad, Bulgaria

Thomas Van Dyke wrote:
And please accept an apology for the initial reply to your query...
Sadly it seems that Retouchers once they have achieved commercial success are rather unwilling to assist newly emerging talent... Possibly George may rethink his initial post and offer actual applied wisdom/methodology  to the mix... I certainly would like to see another retoucher with tenure share their thoughts here...

Thomas, there is nothing to rethink. I would appreciate if you don't speak on my behalf and post unsolicited personal conclusions directly or indirectly. Not because I am concerned but because it is off-topic. I don't feel I have abused anyone, so please - you don't need to excuse me.

I have already said what I think: input matters and I am not saying it casually. I will keep reminding it on any similar occasion because this is crucial to understanding color correction/grading. You cannot give a valid recipe for a color shift if you don't know what you are shifting. In an older thread a bunch of people attacked me when I said this, then later after they understood it is actually so, they started sending PMs here and on FB to apologize. We had some fun and it was a friendly talk but please let's not start this again. In case you haven't noticed, I gladly help others when I have time, for various problems and that has nothing to do with commercialism, success or anything like that.

There are so many threads in which people ask "how to get this look" and they rarely show actual input. Often the OPs don't even come back. Meanwhile someone comes along and starts "helping" with noble recipes without having the slightest idea about what the raw image looks like, often giving even lengthy instructions with details like "keep opacity 23-27%" and stuff like that. Is that wisdom? What if the scene was shot with some luminescent light with terrible spectrum? Or if the environment added a strong color cast? Or something else? How will you handle different light in case you create a procedure based on rgb luminance (which is what people here suggest in 99.99% of the cases)? You see - such recipes fail instantly, so they have no value. Good post-processing, especially color-wise, starts at the time of shoot planning when you choose the color palette for your scene.

So if you really want to apply some wisdom: 1) look 2) understand what you see 3) work. I think that's the most helpful thing one can learn.

If the OP shows an input image I would be glad to be more specific. But without that I have nothing to add. I hope you don't mind.

Mar 20 17 01:18 pm Link

Photographer

Bertrand Noel

Posts: 3

Paris, Île-de-France, France

Thomas Van Dyke wrote:
Hope this helps or is at least food for thought...
I wish you well Bertrand...

Thank you Thomas for your help !

Mar 22 17 12:43 am Link

Photographer

Bertrand Noel

Posts: 3

Paris, Île-de-France, France

anchev wrote:
You cannot give a valid recipe for a color shift if you don't know what you are shifting..

Anchev, I understand what you say about the interpretation of an image and I totally agree. I edit my images for years and I know it takes experience and work.

I do not want a recipe ready to use on any image, I just want to know how to get a homogeneous shade similar to the photo of my first post without losing the original colors.

I tried using different methods (as gradient map, hue/saturation, selective color, etc.) starting from images very different but I am not satisfied with the result, that's why I came here to ask the opinion of retouchers and photographers.

Have a nice day!

Mar 22 17 12:58 am Link

Retoucher

a k mac

Posts: 469

London, England, United Kingdom

I find it useful to break down the process into stages.

First establish the tonal values/relationships/contrast. This can often best be achieved by viewing the image in greyscale.

The next stage is often to deal with the saturation balance across the image and locally.

Once you have tonal values and saturation under control you can focus on the hues. At this stage there are many options globally and locally. Constraining global adjustments at this stage by using the Hue Blend Mode can be helpful.

More often than not, global adjustments are backed off significantly by reducing the opacity of the adjustment layers, and the final overall look may be achieved by using a number of adjustment layers - Colour Balance, Selective Colour, Gradient Mapping etc, etc.

Then you might move on to texture and grain ( I find it best to float this layer on top, so you can deal with image sharpening later without sharpening the actual grain).

And finally deal with local contrast and image sharpness.

The above approach is just a broad suggestion - in reality, you tend to move back and forth, making interactive adjustments as the work progresses. But the main thing is to have a clear idea of how each of the individual elements (tone, saturation, hue, texture, sharpness etc) contribute to the whole picture, and to be able to identify and manipulate them separately and systematically.

Mar 22 17 04:12 am Link