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Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Has anyone else noticed that the critique forum isn't exactly being used for critiques? It's more like a screening. Most of us post our images to be critiqued, but don't really want to hear anything negative. Or instantly get defensive. Also, when we respond to a post it is typically "Nice job" or something else superficial.

I would like to say right now that I recognize that I am guilty of doing this too and that I do not think that I am above, better or more entitled than anyone else. I am as much of the problem as anyone else and I have a desire to change. Does anyone else?

If we were is a photography class we would be required to critique each other and take our turn being critiqued. I don't know about anyone else, but where I come from that meant you had something to say that contained content and value for the one being critiqued. And if you were being critiqued that meant you sat quietly and listen to everyone without any interruptions, no matter how full of shit you thought they were.

"I don't like it" ask your self why?

"Because it's too dark and I can't see her face" ask yourself what would I have done differently

"I would adjust the contrast with a curves layer"

The only one I see really doing this constantly is Paul Ferrara. I am sure there are others, don't get your panties in a bunch!

There is a reason we don't want to do this. It's because it's hard. It actually requires thought and listening skills. But the result is, or can be without ego, growth and deeper understanding. Not just for yourself, but others too.

My point? Is it broken? Should we fix it?
If so should we:
1. Volunteer to critique in a more heathy manor, and hold to it? Unwritten rules so to speak.

2. All of #1 plus try to get a "showing" forum started also (for just saying "hey look at what I did" "Yeah thats cool").

3. Ignore this and just keep doing what we're doing now?

My vote is for #2. But I am putting money on #3. wink
Sep 06 05 12:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
envisage photography
Posts: 279
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


KUDOS
Sep 06 05 01:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
envisage photography
Posts: 279
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


envisage photography wrote:
KUDOS

Oh wow.. Im "quoting myself..
Iagree and mostly towards paul f. he is actually critiquing the work, If you put your stuff up here be prepared to take criticism,
I would personally rather put my images up here and let Paul rip them apart than show them to a client when they were sub-par. I appreciate constructive criticism. We all should.

Sep 06 05 01:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


There are ways to critique an image without being negative about it.  Consistent "everything you do sucks" comments aren't constructive.

Quite often, there's nothing constructive about the criticism I see posted around here - it's just criticism.  Actually, it's not even criticism; it's incessant, "here's how you f'ed up" commentary that verges on personal vendetta.  What I find particularly amusing is how it's called "constructive" when the intent is to tear others down.

Good-natured, valuable and constructive criticism serves a didactic purpose.  BUT... We need to take into account the experience level of the person whose work we are judging.  I don't think it's necessary to assail beginners with an endless barrage of negative criticism.  Rarely do I see comments about what a photographer/model has done right - only what he/she has done wrong.
Sep 06 05 03:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
LandS
Posts: 45
Aiken, South Carolina, US


If you can find something wrong to comment on you can usually find something right.  And pointing out what is wrong isn't much help without a suggestion on how the person can fix it.  Which is what they wanted the critique for in the first place.
Sep 06 05 04:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
commart
Posts: 6,078
Hagerstown, Maryland, US


Dimensions borrowed from another workshop:

Overall Quality

Originality

Communication of Theme

Technical Skill


My overall approach:

Technical facility and merit.  Usually, not always, the technical contribution tells the audience about the artist's ability, ambition, experience, and talent before anything else.

Literary merit.  In my (trollish) little world, this is how I see the work standing among other works, contemporary and historical, from one school or another, in its field.

When you have an artist who has mastered a set of tools, then you can deal with facets of the artist's creativity (originality), humanity, and vision.  The ability to "take a good picture" may not translate into the making of aesthetically or culturally significant ones, but there's a lot of room between the two states, and not everyone wants a show at the Whitney.
Sep 06 05 04:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
George ephrem
Posts: 981
Jacksonville, Florida, US


Ok ...fire on me ..give me your best shot
give me a critique of some sort

Ya'll, have a great day and God bless

Pray for the  hurricanne victims

....leave all critiiques on my port, as I have to go to wk this morning(Fire Dept)

Happy to have a place to GO... to work at.!!!
Sep 06 05 04:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PW Productions
Posts: 3,108
Mount Kisco, New York, US


I agree. The critiques fall short. To be honest, though, I've not yet encountered good criticism, on the Web or in real life. When I ask workshop instructors about some of my shots, they see less of what's wrong with it then I do (or at least they say less).

And here, with some people's thin skin, commenting can sometimes lead to a nasty exchange. I hear Paul hired a bodyguard...
Sep 06 05 05:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Julia Gerace
Posts: 1,889
Monroe, Connecticut, US


critiques are a nasty business....  I actually think that photosig is on the right track (still a ways to go but definitely not a huge attaboy site (that it used to be))

the problem with cc is that:

1.  there is a huge lacking of respect from both sides - people think their sh*t doesn't stink therefor will go out of their way to either nitpick, teardown, or otherwise belittle through stupid 'wit' everyone elses stuff...

2.  everyone thinks they know more than they do and because of that, everyone thinks their cc is gold....god forbid you actually try to defend your choices or your work.

3.  how many people do you actually value enough to cc your work? because the internet opens it up to anyone with an opinion (see #2)

out of all the photo sites I've been on, I have yet to see everyone act decently towards everyone else....it becomes petty and useless pretty quickly....

just my thoughts this morning....

Julia
Sep 06 05 06:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bruce Caines
Posts: 522
New York, New York, US


people just get weird when they think you are saying something they don't want to hear about their work. this may have a lot to do with the tepid critiques people post.

i posted comments on a model's profile about some images which were clearly, above the quality she had posted before. i let her know this and pointed out a few little things she should be aware of as a model when shooting and evaluating the work the photographer was doing or images s/he was giving her. i also mentioned that the photographer had done a nice job. the photographer read (skimmed) my comments, pulled out only the words that could be taken negatively and fired off a nasty email/message to me. he didn't simply ask why i said what i did say (although had he read it he would have gotten the message), he proceded to attack my work--and me personally. wtf?

so it's hard to know who you are dealing with. nobody likes to be told they aren't a genius, but even when constructive crticism is offered, there are people who can't take it. this fosters lame critiques because you often end up wasting your breath on someone who merely wants a pat on the head and a "you are sooooo talented" comment.
Sep 06 05 06:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Julia Gerace
Posts: 1,889
Monroe, Connecticut, US


agreed... 

one other thing is that sometimes I think that critiquers don't take a minute to think about 2 things - 1. the level of the photographer creating the images (because, seriously, if a beginner underexposes it's usually by accident, if a pro underexposes it's usually intentional 2. what the goal of the shot was in the first place - was it working on lighting? if so, what kind? was it working on posing? was it showcasing a product and not the model?     

nothing bothers me more than when you're working on butterfly lighting and someone says the light is too flat or you're working on rembrandt lighting and someone says it's too shadowy....it takes just as much effort to understand/critique what you're seeing as it does to create the image.....

Julia
Sep 06 05 06:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Justin N Lane
Posts: 1,720
Brooklyn, New York, US


what you have on every board is a cocktail of ego and anonymity... it leads to a lot of petty personal comments and photographers spouting what they'd do differently... so often the critique is more about the CRITIQUER rather than the work or the person shooting it.

Juila raises an interesting point about the intention of the photographer being critiqued... I've gotten "crappy snapshot" comments from a few people when they fail to realize that every single thing I do is deliberate- they read the words but fail to understand the sentence.

The day someone offers up something like "You know, to get across more effectively what you're trying to do here...you might consider trying...or look at the work of...and consider..." well, I might soil myself.
Sep 06 05 07:00 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Kitt Erikson
Posts: 76
Colorado Springs, Colorado, US


Hi.  New here, but I thought I'd throw in my two cents as well.  I agree that the biggest problems in online critiques are usually the atta boy person or the person who just tears the work down with no advice on what could have been done differently.  The other problem I've noticed ist that people doing the critique don't always pay attention to the detail that sometimes it's the model asking for a critique.  In this case, knowing what makes a photo good or bad does help to pick which to use for a portfolio, however, the model's end is rarely discussed in these critiques.  If I get a critique about how my photo is framed or exposed, etc, there's not much I can do about that; on the other hand, if comments were made on the pose, the attitude, the look, etc, this is information I can use.  It's hard to take a critique sometimes, but if we never change, we never grow.  So try to be honest, helpful, and even a little gentle.  That's my two cents.
~Kitt
Sep 06 05 07:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MS Photo Chicago
Posts: 387
Chicago, Illinois, US


Most critiques are too technical without evaluating the entire photo. Technical critiques are merited if it's a serious flaw that is hurting the photo. A good example of an unwarranted technical critique would be chopping off the top of someone’s head. This something that was taboo at one point but seems acceptable today, yet people still lose their crap when they see this.

The biggest flaw with asking for critiques is people are concerned with one image but they do not provide enough info about the image or a series to view. If you are going for snapshot style images but everything you have is heavily stylized studio work then of course someone will assume it's an outtake. I think posting multiple photos help because people can see consistency across the work.

Lastly, most of the work on this site is geared towards portfolios - not magazines and art galleries (this is a generalization) despite what most photogs and models claim so the real question should be is this good enough to get me work. Most of glamour stuff is like shooting landscapes, but instead is it sunset and did the spot have interesting foreground it's is the middle hot enough, in a pose we've all seen and the light soft.

mike
Sep 06 05 07:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
David Nusbaum
Posts: 284
Rochester, Minnesota, US


I think a little more structure in the critique forum would be helpful. If done right, the critique forum could be the best learning tool on this site.
- As Michael was pointing out, we need to understand the intent and/or context of an image in order to provide a web based critique. A request for a critique should provide this intent or context.
- It takes time to provide a real critique. Requests could ask for a general critique of series or portfolio or they could ask for a detailed critique of a specific image. Asking for a detailed critique or every image in a series or portfolio would not be appropriate.
- As a requestor of a critique, you agree to accept all input without debate. The requestor can decide that a critique is crap and ignore it but they should not try to justify their work. Providers of critiques with differing opinions could debate.
Sep 06 05 08:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Brian Diaz
Posts: 62,884
Danbury, Connecticut, US


Justin N Lane wrote:
The day someone offers up something like "You know, to get across more effectively what you're trying to do here...you might consider trying...or look at the work of...and consider..." well, I might soil myself.

This is the assumption of critiques.  If everyone said that in every critical comment, we'd be here for days reading useless words intended to diffuse the effectiveness of one's opinion.

I'm a fan of Paul's critiques.  I often disagree with him, and he can rarely see beyond his own style of photography (though he is getting better at that) but he will never lie to you.  He will never placate an ego, which is more destructive to criticism than a blow to one's ego.

Sep 06 05 09:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Brian Diaz
Posts: 62,884
Danbury, Connecticut, US


David Nusbaum wrote:
I think a little more structure in the critique forum would be helpful. If done right, the critique forum could be the best learning tool on this site.

http://modelmayhem.com/posts.php?thread_id=7336

Sep 06 05 09:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
David Nusbaum
Posts: 284
Rochester, Minnesota, US


Brian Diaz wrote:

http://modelmayhem.com/posts.php?thread_id=7336

Sorry I missed that!
Did anything come out of that discussion?

Sep 06 05 09:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Wow! So I guess I am not the only one.

So, lets organize some rules. Maybe get something changed around here.
Also, If we all critique in this manor, it is more likely that new people to the site will fall right in line and we will have social order.
Sep 06 05 09:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


David Nusbaum wrote:
I think a little more structure in the critique forum would be helpful. If done right, the critique forum could be the best learning tool on this site.
- As Michael was pointing out, we need to understand the intent and/or context of an image in order to provide a web based critique. A request for a critique should provide this intent or context.
- It takes time to provide a real critique. Requests could ask for a general critique of series or portfolio or they could ask for a detailed critique of a specific image. Asking for a detailed critique or every image in a series or portfolio would not be appropriate.
- As a requestor of a critique, you agree to accept all input without debate. The requestor can decide that a critique is crap and ignore it but they should not try to justify their work. Providers of critiques with differing opinions could debate.

I think these are very good points.
Maybe a beginner tag should in the title, "Beginner -Please critique". But I don't think anything else should be used, like pro, or master or something like that because it only invites trouble.

Maybe a tag for the level of critique wanted. "quick" or "general", "detailed -New images from the zoo" or whatever.

Sep 06 05 09:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RobHowardStudios
Posts: 554
Mount Pleasant, Michigan, US


I say if you put your work up, you are asking for critisism. It is you duty to your art to take that critisism and make the best of it. FOR YOUR ART... NOT YOUR EGO!

With that said, we should all have a very thick skin. Everyone can see ass kissing for what it is. Just filter through the comments and take what you can from it.

We need to get used to hearing what is wrong with our images as well as what is right with them. We will have tools to use to grow from critiques.

"GREAT IMAGE" is not a critique.
Sep 06 05 10:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Nicholson Photography
Posts: 586
Columbus, Georgia, US


AlbrightCreativeImagery wrote:
Has anyone else noticed that the critique forum isn't exactly being used for critiques? It's more like a screening. Most of us post our images to be critiqued, but don't really want to hear anything negative. Or instantly get defensive. Also, when we respond to a post it is typically "Nice job" or something else superficial.

I would like to say right now that I recognize that I am guilty of doing this too and that I do not think that I am above, better or more entitled than anyone else. I am as much of the problem as anyone else and I have a desire to change. Does anyone else?

If we were is a photography class we would be required to critique each other and take our turn being critiqued. I don't know about anyone else, but where I come from that meant you had something to say that contained content and value for the one being critiqued. And if you were being critiqued that meant you sat quietly and listen to everyone without any interruptions, no matter how full of shit you thought they were.

"I don't like it" ask your self why?

"Because it's too dark and I can't see her face" ask yourself what would I have done differently

"I would adjust the contrast with a curves layer"

The only one I see really doing this constantly is Paul Ferrara. I am sure there are others, don't get your panties in a bunch!

There is a reason we don't want to do this. It's because it's hard. It actually requires thought and listening skills. But the result is, or can be without ego, growth and deeper understanding. Not just for yourself, but others too.

My point? Is it broken? Should we fix it?
If so should we:
1. Volunteer to critique in a more heathy manor, and hold to it? Unwritten rules so to speak.

2. All of #1 plus try to get a "showing" forum started also (for just saying "hey look at what I did" "Yeah thats cool").

3. Ignore this and just keep doing what we're doing now?

My vote is for #2. But I am putting money on #3. wink

there are a lot of photographers who are not pros and havent gone to school for photography.
so they dont know how to give or take crits.

Sep 06 05 10:22 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
commart
Posts: 6,078
Hagerstown, Maryland, US


I'm not so big on social order, lol, but may observe that those most enthusiastic here about criticism as an art seem the least in need of education in it.  We're aware of context and intent, the descrepencies between the ideal and the realized, the various genre and pathways in style.   In fact, the old academy and art league part has been accomplished through processes elsewhere, and that's a marvelous thing: De Tocqueville laughs happily ever after in his grave.

Art and entertainment have always two, perhaps three or four, audiences: business staff, partners and patrons; competitive and cooperating peers in production (that's the noise here); the royal court (where I hedge in a democratic society); and the rest of humanity.  In that "the rest of humanity" buys into and consumes art, I'm quite happy to hear an unsupported "kick ass" (alright, even a "really sucks") right beside a "you really blew out the highs in that one, didn't you, Jimbo?" (followed, sigh, by a long, finger-wagging essay).  smile 

On the matter of manners, good ones pair with good will.  That's a web-wide culture and social issue that may repair itself as more traditionally educated or trained professionals (the ladies and gentlemen of the court and all of its flowdown) pick up the reins on boards and good moderators weed out real trouble.  Personally, I'd like to think I've outgrown lying in the gutter while looking up at the stars, but one foot in the street and the other on the mansion steps still suits.  I wouldn't want an exclusive society in either direction.
Sep 06 05 10:23 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Nicholson Photography wrote:
there are a lot of photographers who are not pros and havent gone to school for photography.
so they dont know how to give or take crits.

I agree with you.
I don't have a degree, and I consider myself self taught for the most part. I have had plenty of drawing, painting, design classes in community collage (and photography too). So I am sort of in the middle. But the basic principles to a critique are simple, and maybe we could cover that. Or even have an instructional post that stays at the top of the critique forum like in the casting calls forum ("DAMMIT, WHERE? SAY A ----LOCATION---- IN THE SUBJECT LINE!", crude, but you get the picture)
As for big words, http://dictionary.reference.com/
I don't think it would hurt to learn something new. smile

Sep 06 05 10:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Peter Dattolo
Posts: 1,669
Wolcott, Connecticut, US


I agree with what brian said about paul as being honest but i would have to add brian as one of those people also that give good cc(critique) and are honest.

I am talking about giving a critique without putting the person down or making them feel as if they should just stop doing photos all together.
I appreciate a honest critique and other people view points and why they think this or that, but to go beyond that and be overly negative about a critique is not doing anybody any good except that your being a pin cushion for someone else's bad day.

EDIT: sorry reading it again and thinking "What the hell does cc mean?"  LOL  suppost to be critique
Sep 06 05 10:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Peter Dattolo
Posts: 1,669
Wolcott, Connecticut, US


AlbrightCreativeImagery wrote:
As for big words, http://dictionary.reference.com/
I don't think it would hurt to learn something new. smile

This is another dictionary site i have for my son

http://www.answers.com/rake

Sep 06 05 10:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Peter Dattolo wrote:
This is another dictionary site i have for my son

http://www.answers.com/rake

Hey, that's a lot nicer. Thanks, I am switching to that one.

Sep 06 05 10:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Peter Dattolo
Posts: 1,669
Wolcott, Connecticut, US


AlbrightCreativeImagery wrote:

Hey, that's a lot nicer. Thanks, I am switching to that one.

Your welcome, glad it is useful.

Sep 06 05 11:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Columbus Photo
Posts: 2,318
Columbus, Georgia, US


Geez, do I now get to be MM's official critiquer? wink

I don't do that great a job and rarely try to get into the photographer's head as to why he did something in a particular way.  I just point out things that I notice that go against traditional portraiture (cut off part of the left eye, etc).  And also items like failure to adust levels (so many folks do this).

I'm also guilty of being a smart-ass at times.  Some images are so bad (technically), I wonder why it got posted for critique in the first place.  Folks get to see a lot of great work on MM, it makes me wonder.

Paul
Sep 06 05 11:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Farenell Photography
Posts: 18,009
Albany, New York, US


AlbrightCreativeImagery wrote:
Has anyone else noticed that the critique forum isn't exactly being used for critiques? It's more like a screening. Most of us post our images to be critiqued, but don't really want to hear anything negative. Or instantly get defensive. Also, when we respond to a post it is typically "Nice job" or something else superficial.

I would like to say right now that I recognize that I am guilty of doing this too and that I do not think that I am above, better or more entitled than anyone else. I am as much of the problem as anyone else and I have a desire to change. Does anyone else?

If we were is a photography class we would be required to critique each other and take our turn being critiqued. I don't know about anyone else, but where I come from that meant you had something to say that contained content and value for the one being critiqued. And if you were being critiqued that meant you sat quietly and listen to everyone without any interruptions, no matter how full of shit you thought they were.

"I don't like it" ask your self why?

"Because it's too dark and I can't see her face" ask yourself what would I have done differently

"I would adjust the contrast with a curves layer"

The only one I see really doing this constantly is Paul Ferrara. I am sure there are others, don't get your panties in a bunch!

There is a reason we don't want to do this. It's because it's hard. It actually requires thought and listening skills. But the result is, or can be without ego, growth and deeper understanding. Not just for yourself, but others too.

My point? Is it broken? Should we fix it?
If so should we:
1. Volunteer to critique in a more heathy manor, and hold to it? Unwritten rules so to speak.

2. All of #1 plus try to get a "showing" forum started also (for just saying "hey look at what I did" "Yeah thats cool").

3. Ignore this and just keep doing what we're doing now?

My vote is for #2. But I am putting money on #3. wink

You make some interesting points. Some of my thoughts...

A- I tend to think that the lack of worthwhile "critiques" sections, derives from people who were never trained to critiquely think about an image entails. If a person doesn't know what to look for, why should they be expected to think about an image.

B- A lot of us come from EXTREMELY different backgrounds. When they look at an image, I feel they look at it from their own narrow viewpoint. Would I look at a high-fashion photographers portfolio in the same way that I would...I dunno...look at the great Edward Weston or Robert Capa's. Absolutely not. But I feel we get so absorded in our little niches that we sometimes forget that * gasp * there are photographers out there that 1- don't do this for a living, 2- learn by doing, & 3- are more interested in pushing themselves creatively beyond whatever it is that they've done in the past.

C- There are people out there that are solely looking specifically for an "atta-boy" to revalidate themselves. Anything you say are not going to help these people. Sorry.

D- Personally opinion, the internet is not really a great place for critiques. I find it very impersonal & feel A LOT of people hide behind the anononimity of it all. They'll say things on here that they wouldn't dream of saying elsewhere. Furthermore being critiqued on the outside, at least you could give some sort of like opening statement of what you were trying to do versus what came out. Additionally, you can't judge a person's vocal tone by what is in type.

E- I've found that people will judge you based on the skill level & resources that they have. Although that's nice, it really doesn't help me in the longrun. Using a flash lighting system may be nice but that is simply just NOT in the cards in even the remote future. Heck, its hard enough arranging 2-peoples schedules (myself & the model) let alone 3-peoples schedules (myself, the model, & the reflector person).

F- A lot of times people are just lazy. They like an image enough to comment on it, yet don't have the time or energy to go into detail. I've certainly been guilty of that at times.

So yeah, I apologize if parts of it got repeatative or you're like "what the heck is this idiot saying?" Hopefully, you got the gyst of what I was saying.

Matthew

Sep 06 05 11:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Peter Dattolo
Posts: 1,669
Wolcott, Connecticut, US


To me i think of a critique as expanding my ideas. The only way i see to expand is to take a critique and see your work as they see it and use that in future photoshoots to get different looks in your work.
I value another persons view on my work because when i take the photo i see what i see, not what someone else might see.
By listening to a critique and understanding why the person see's it as they do you can improve your technique by trying it next time. It is kinda like not getting stuck in a routine of photo taking as i look at it. If your in a routine you can never improve or expand because once in that routine people tend to think they know everything.
You can have 20 people use the same camera, same subject, same lighting and they will all see something different in the photo before and after they take it. All are good and all are interesting view points....now go talk to them all and see if you can see what they see in the photo and add it to yours.
Sep 06 05 11:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wayne Cutler
Posts: 632
Los Angeles, California, US


LMAO!  I just posted a critique here on Charles Kimball's three new nudes before reading yours.  I wouldn't call it a critique, but rather my opinion on his photo "Marykate amid the rubble."  Please read it and see if I'm on the same page you are.

After doing photography for many years, one thing is apparent to me is that any image I produce can be criticize.  (You may criticize my images but please do it by message and not by a Tag.  Tagging an image with a criticism could hurt business. LOL.)  I think this just might apply to others.  LOL  I have always said that not all of Ansel Adams images were great, but all his prints were great, i.e. technically great.

In closing, there is only one critic that you have to please - the customer.  Thanks for letting me voice my opinion.
Sep 06 05 01:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Zachary Reed
Posts: 523
Denver, Colorado, US


im all for getting critiqued. just dont say how pretty or ugly me or my models are. actually critique the photo
Sep 06 05 01:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Wayne M Cutler wrote:
LMAO!  I just posted a critique here on Charles Kimball's three new nudes before reading yours.  I wouldn't call it a critique, but rather my opinion on his photo "Marykate amid the rubble."  Please read it and see if I'm on the same page you are.

Yes you are wink

Sep 06 05 01:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Zach Watkins wrote:
im all for getting critiqued. just dont say how pretty or ugly me or my models are. actually critique the photo

Man your ugly! And where did you get those models? The morgue?
Just Kidding!!smile

Sep 06 05 01:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C Hansen Photography
Posts: 306
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


A little thing we do in the Army is come up with a possible solution for the problem.

If someone asks for a critique by all means give it.  Be constructive and not demeaning about it but also give a suggestion to help that person improve next time around.
Sep 06 05 02:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
The Art of CIP
Posts: 1,074
Long Beach, California, US


yeah....  The critiques in the critiques forums are not constructive at all...  I usually message about five photographers on MM directly when I've needed a critique...  Each of them offered their opinions, likes and dislikes, pointed out things that I'd missed and gave constructive tips on how to improve...  I guess it's just a matter of doing alittle extra footwork..  After all  would you walk onto the convention floor at a photography convention and yell out "Hey!!!  Can I get a critique!!?!?!"  No you'd probably browse around and ask the opinions of the photographers whose work is far beyond your own....  Anyways - HAPPY SHOOTING!!!!
Sep 06 05 02:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wayne Cutler
Posts: 632
Los Angeles, California, US


AlbrightCreativeImagery wrote:

Yes you are wink

Makes me feel better.  LMAO  BTW, I like your work except for the posing of your models, colors used, your MUA, and lack of composition. ROFLMAO  Keep up the good work and you have a great sense of humor.

Sep 06 05 02:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Albright
Posts: 222
Fort Wayne, Indiana, US


Wayne M Cutler wrote:

Makes me feel better.  LMAO  BTW, I like your work except for the posing of your models, colors used, your MUA, and lack of composition. ROFLMAO  Keep up the good work and you have a great sense of humor.

lol smile

Sep 06 05 02:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
12082
Posts: 1,292
Los Angeles, California, US


I've appreciated Paul's comments too, from Muse Cube to MM, too bad Paul is all the way in Ohio! Oh well, lucky for those girls big_smile

While I realize this is mostly a sound off board for photographers - Models, Stylists, etc. post in the critique forum too. It helps to have criticism that addresses our professions - our photo may be crappy (jee thanks wink ) - but is there something we can do to improve it? For example, for a MUA, does the make up need to change and if so how?

Also sometimes people ask very specific questions. Granted the majority of the posts are "tell me what you think" vague but sometimes there's a yes or no answer or pick from the 20 the best in x 4.

And no matter what you're saying, there's a nice way to say it. There's absolutely no need to be rude or mean and if you are, the person isn't likely to hear or use any constructiveness of your comment.
Sep 06 05 03:09 pm  Link  Quote 
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