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12last
Photographer
MIAMI PHOTOGENICS
Posts: 9
Miami, Florida, US


Hi Everyone,
My name is Oz and I'm pretty new to MM and trying my luck at fashion photography - I have been photographing for about 10 years but mostly still life, landscape and nature.  I'm curious on your thoughts on photo permits that may be required to do a shoot in public property.  For instance I live in Miami and I've discovered that there are permits required.  Since I'm just starting out my portfolio is limited and it will be an expensive feat to have to pull a permit to do TF shoots - permits start at $300+ depening where in Miami you're shooting.

I've never had to worry about this with nature/landscape because you can be a lot more discreet - but when you have a whole set-up and models - it may be hard to avoid attention.

Any thoughts and guidance would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Oz
Jan 12 10 12:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


MIA OZ wrote:
Hi Everyone,
My name is Oz and I'm pretty new to MM and trying my luck at fashion photography - I have been photographing for about 10 years but mostly still life, landscape and nature.  I'm curious on your thoughts on photo permits that may be required to do a shoot in public property.  For instance I live in Miami and I've discovered that there are permits required.  Since I'm just starting out my portfolio is limited and it will be an expensive feat to have to pull a permit to do TF shoots - permits start at $300+ depening where in Miami you're shooting.

I've never had to worry about this with nature/landscape because you can be a lot more discreet - but when you have a whole set-up and models - it may be hard to avoid attention.

Any thoughts and guidance would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Oz

You can get permits in Miami for less than $300 easily.... contact Filmiami.org & get a 28 day blanket permit... this runs $100 ... you will need certificates of general liability in order to be approved....

You will also be required to pay location fees... for example Haulover Beach is cheap as all you need to pay is parking fees for each vehicle... my last shoot there was $30.
Key Biscayne State Beach Park was $140....

Depends on what locations you are looking at.... so best thing to do is to contact the locations you are considering & ask what their location fees are.... dont waste your time with Nicky Beach Club... they are insanely expensive & refuse to allow you to have a closed area for your shoot.. basically you have to deal with customers wandering through your shot & pay for the privilege $800 for 1/2 day... $1500 full day....

Jan 12 10 12:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


MIA OZ wrote:
Since I'm just starting out my portfolio is limited and it will be an expensive feat to have to pull a permit to do TF shoots - permits start at $300+ depening where in Miami you're shooting.

It's pathetic that such barriers exist to up-and-coming talent. Perhaps thats how their more experienced counterparts like it.

I'd start out with simpler shoots at less populated places, taking the approach that it's easier to ask for forgiveness, and it may be worth traveling just enough to get out of the city.

Another option is to aquire backgrounds and other equipment that facilitates shooting indoors.

Jan 12 10 12:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

Perhaps thats how their more experienced counterparts like it.

This is a joke, right?

Jan 12 10 12:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PE Arts
Posts: 1,040
Falls Church, Virginia, US


please act like a tourist and you won't have to pay for permits... they sure don't

so downsize your camera and find a model on here who will say she's your cousin, and walk around a local main street

a highend point and shoot, like a LX3, or S90, that will give you a raw file is all you need to get started on your workflow, as your first 5 shoots will be have most of the images deleted later on as you discover you style, and what you actually like to shoot when having people pose for you
Jan 12 10 12:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Not on here
Posts: 48
Chicago, Illinois, US


rp_photo wrote:

It's pathetic that such barriers exist to up-and-coming talent. Perhaps thats how their more experienced counterparts like it.

I'd start out with simpler shoots at less populated places, taking the approach that it's easier to ask for forgiveness, and it may be worth traveling just enough to get out of the city.

Another option is to aquire backgrounds and other equipment that facilitates shooting indoors.

Permits are actually something that works in favor of professionals. If not for permits, you would have people walking around when you are trying to work. That problem can be very costly when you are shooting a movie or doing a 3 day set up for photo shoots.

If its a simple get in and get out type of shoot, then that takes just a few minutes. But anything bigger the cost is justified by the results of the images and that means no problems from people walking around the area.

Jan 12 10 12:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Studio Photography
Posts: 963
Santa Clara, California, US


Can't you simply just go packing light ie...no tripods or lightstands and just shoot and then just act stupid if someone tells you you can't and stop then smile

That way I'm sure you are bound to get some shots at least.  Then again I'm not from Miami so what do I know.
Jan 12 10 12:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
This is a joke, right?

Not meant to be a joke at all.

An established pro with sufficient means would have no trouble with permit and insurance costs, and could stand to benefit from less congestion at their locations and less local competition.

Of course I can't give a specific example, but neither can it be proven not to occur.

Billy 123 wrote:
Permits are actually something that works in favor of professionals. If not for permits, you would have people walking around when you are trying to work. That problem can be very costly when you are shooting a movie or doing a 3 day set up for photo shoots.

That's part of my point.

Jan 12 10 12:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PE Arts
Posts: 1,040
Falls Church, Virginia, US


rp_photo wrote:

Not meant to be a joke at all.

An established pro with sufficient means would have no trouble with permit and insurance costs, and could stand to benefit from less congestion at their locations and less local competition.

Of course I can't give a specific example, but neither can it be proven not to occur.

rp is correct here...  when possible and especially when you need control of the area your shooting in, a permit will cut down on your need to wait for people to walk by, or have to blur, clone out their bodies/faces later in photoshop/video editor on commercial projects smile

Jan 12 10 12:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


PE Art Photography wrote:
rp is correct here...  when possible and especially when you need control of the area your shooting in, a permit will cut down on your need to wait for people to walk by, or have to blur, clone out their bodies/faces later in photoshop/video editor on commercial projects smile

I have trouble believing that a permit will buy you much control, but rather see as a bare minimal protection from law enforcement harrassment.

Jan 12 10 12:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

Not meant to be a joke at all.

An established pro with sufficient means would have no trouble with permit and insurance costs, and could stand to benefit from less congestion at their locations and less local competition.

So you honestly believe that I enjoy dealing with permit agencies, location managers, law enforcement, city, state & federal agencies on a photoshoot because I fall into your classification of an established pro?

Not every shoot we "established pros" work on is a big budget client production.... sometimes we like to shoot our own projects too & we have to deal with permit BS.

Permits do not guarantee a closed set unless you pay additional costs... in public locations the public have a right to be there too... this is spelled out in the permit documents for most beaches etc. To have a closed set is expensive, requires law enforcement officers, security personnel & screens/tents... simply not practical or cost effective for personal project work.

Your post suggests that because I fall into the category of "established pro" I must have an unlimited source of $$$... to also suggest that as a pro I want to see permit fees is nonsense.

Jan 12 10 01:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
2ndhand Studios
Posts: 111
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US


I shot all over south beach and never got bothered.  No permits.  One shoot I even had 4 models and my assistant there.  The key is to carry very little stuff like they said.  I just used a reflector and my camera.  also, it helps to shoot dumb early in the morning if you don't want crowds in your shots.
Jan 12 10 01:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chili
Posts: 5,146
Brooklyn, New York, US


dont shoot in miami..shoot in the city of miami beach...permits are free last time i got 1 (2009 MBUSA/IMG Fashion week) you need proof of insurance, $1 million dollars liability i think is minimum

you can get a city of miami beach to cover all streets for any period of time...note beach permits are seperate as someone above already said...i usually ask for police to assist too..i think that was $25/hour for 2 hour minimum per officer...like i wouldnt try shooting during memorial weekend in south beach w/o a police escort (i think u know why lol)

also try to develope "relationships" with some of the hotel mgrs of the day or PR mgrs...then u can shoot around the hotel property (including beach) w/o permit
Jan 12 10 01:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Not on here
Posts: 48
Chicago, Illinois, US


Sometimes it's better just to agree that we can at times disagree with each other and regardless of how hard we try we are not going to convince another person of our own beliefs regardless how hard we try.
Jan 12 10 01:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


Just for some clarification.... how many of those posting here actually get permits for shoots on a regular basis? Each year I get around 75 permits in the US & another 30 or so overseas.

Permits DO NOT automatically = Closed Sets.... to do that you need to pay ADDITIONAL FEES

On a public beach the general public are not required to leave the area simply because you have a permit.... if you believe you can move people from your set you are wrong.

A permit simply means that you have permission to shoot, that your general liability insurance has been placed on file & that you hold harmless the permitting authority should any liability issues arise.
Jan 12 10 01:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
Your post suggests that because I fall into the category of "established pro" I must have an unlimited source of $$$... to also suggest that as a pro I want to see permit fees is nonsense.

I have no way of knowing your personal situation or preferences, but I'm confident that at least some prefer and benefit from the status quo.

Given that a purpose of permits is to control congestion, what might be fair and support the needs of both newbies and pros would be a "standby" system in which permits aren't required if no one else in the area would be impacted.

Buying a permit for a specific time would guarantee the right to shoot, and those without permits would be able to shoot if the area is uncongested.

Another option would be "photographer days" when permit requirments are waived, perhaps during off-peak days or seasons.

This way, each photographer can decide how important the shoot is and whether it's worth pre-investing the permit fees or putting up with congestion.

H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
On a public beach the general public are not required to leave the area simply because you have a permit.... if you believe you can move people from your set you are wrong.

A permit simply means that you have permission to shoot, that your general liability insurance has been placed on file & that you hold harmless the permitting authority should any liability issues arise.

If a photographer is willing to accomodate and tolerate the public, then perhaps they shouldn't need a permit any more than those doing other potentially disruptive things.

If visitors don't need insurance for dogs, cooking, surfing, and other activity, why should photography require it?

My point is that permits should only be required when a photographer (or practitioner of another activity) needs to make special demands.

Jan 12 10 01:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MIAMI PHOTOGENICS
Posts: 9
Miami, Florida, US


Thank you so much for all your replies and thoughts - all are well taken and gives me an idea on how this topic is handled form different perspectives.  Thanks to all again.
Jan 12 10 01:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


Chili wrote:
dont shoot in miami..shoot in the city of miami beach...permits are free last time i got 1 (2009 MBUSA/IMG Fashion week) you need proof of insurance, $1 million dollars liability i think is minimum

you can get a city of miami beach to cover all streets for any period of time...note beach permits are seperate as someone above already said...i usually ask for police to assist too..i think that was $25/hour for 2 hour minimum per officer...like i wouldnt try shooting during memorial weekend in south beach w/o a police escort (i think u know why lol)

also try to develope "relationships" with some of the hotel mgrs of the day or PR mgrs...then u can shoot around the hotel property (including beach) w/o permit

City of Miami Beach actually require an additional document called a notarized indemnity agreement.... There are also fees involved.

Here is an email I received from the permitting official for City of Miami Beach....
~~~~
Thank you for you permit request to shoot on Miami Beach.  In order to process your permit I need a certificate of insurance naming the City of Miami Beach (with our address) as the certificated holder and named as additionally insured.  I will also need a notarized indemnity agreement, you can download the agreement from our website.  All the details are at www.filmiamibeach.com under Apply for a Permit.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,

Silvia Royer.

MIAMIBEACH
Silvia Royer, Film and Print Production Liaison
TOURISM AND CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
1700 Convention Center Drive, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Tel: 305-673-7577 x2711 or 305-673-7070/ Fax: 786-394-4559/ Cel: 305-970-8396  www.miamibeachfl.gov

Jan 12 10 01:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chili
Posts: 5,146
Brooklyn, New York, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:

So you honestly believe that I enjoy dealing with permit agencies, location managers, law enforcement, city, state & federal agencies on a photoshoot because I fall into your classification of an established pro?

Not every shoot we "established pros" work on is a big budget client production.... sometimes we like to shoot our own projects too & we have to deal with permit BS.

Permits do not guarantee a closed set unless you pay additional costs... in public locations the public have a right to be there too... this is spelled out in the permit documents for most beaches etc. To have a closed set is expensive, requires law enforcement officers, security personnel & screens/tents... simply not practical or cost effective for personal project work.

Your post suggests that because I fall into the category of "established pro" I must have an unlimited source of $$$... to also suggest that as a pro I want to see permit fees is nonsense.

permits in nyc are free...we've had a nyc movie permit and the police closed the street for us to shoot/film the legendary batmobile limo in front of NYC hotel...we did a shoot w/ lingerie and mercedes mclaren in front of a NYC niteclub..again nypd intermittently closed the street and kept patrons from getting too close to the car and models (we also had written permission of the hotel/club...im acquaintance of the mgrs...as i said above develope relationships with properties!!)

so you spend 1/2 day filling out forms...me personally? i usually get a assist from craigslist who is more than happy to run around dropping off/picking up (and sometimes filling out) permits for free

Jan 12 10 01:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

I have no way of knowing your personal situation or preferences, but I'm confident that at least some prefer and benefit from the status quo.

Given that a purpose of permits is to control congestion, what might be fair and support the needs of both newbies and pros would be a "standby" system in which permits aren't required if no one else in the area would be impacted.

Buying a permit for a specific time would guarantee the right to shoot, and those without permits would be able to shoot if the area is uncongested.

Another option would be "photographer days" when permit requirments are waived, perhaps during off-peak days or seasons.

This way, each photographer can decide how important the shoot is and whether it's worth pre-investing the permit fees or putting up with congestion.

Your understanding of the permit system is not accurate... the main purpose of the permitting system from the permitting authority's perspective is to verify insurance & to reduce liability. Shooting congestion is the secondary consideration.

I dont know many colleagues that are happy with the permitting systems in place.... our fees tend to be much higher as we are shooting commercially... consider this additional cost as subsidizing fees for amateurs.... Students are normally exempt from fees but are normally required to have a physical paper permit.

Jan 12 10 01:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chili
Posts: 5,146
Brooklyn, New York, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:

City of Miami Beach actually require an additional document called a notarized indemnity agreement.... There are also fees involved.

Here is an email I received from the permitting official for City of Miami Beach....
~~~~
Thank you for you permit request to shoot on Miami Beach.  In order to process your permit I need a certificate of insurance naming the City of Miami Beach (with our address) as the certificated holder and named as additionally insured.  I will also need a notarized indemnity agreement, you can download the agreement from our website.  All the details are at www.filmiamibeach.com under Apply for a Permit.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,

Silvia Royer.

MIAMIBEACH
Silvia Royer, Film and Print Production Liaison
TOURISM AND CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
1700 Convention Center Drive, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Tel: 305-673-7577 x2711 or 305-673-7070/ Fax: 786-394-4559/ Cel: 305-970-8396  www.miamibeachfl.gov

i know silvia...you dont have to pay a $100 fee!!!!!! go back and re-read the instructions!!! but you also need to fill out the indemnity clause...its not a big deal

you can do everything via email too

Jan 12 10 01:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


Chili wrote:

permits in nyc are free...we've had a nyc movie permit and the police closed the street for us to shoot/film the legendary batmobile limo in front of NYC hotel...we did a shoot w/ lingerie and mercedes mclaren in front of a NYC niteclub..again nypd intermittently closed the street and kept patrons from getting too close to the car and models (we also had written permission of the hotel/club...im acquaintance of the mgrs...as i said above develope relationships with properties!!)

so you spend 1/2 day filling out forms...me personally? i usually get a assist from craigslist who is more than happy to run around dropping off/picking up (and sometimes filling out) permits for free

Try doing the same thing in LA & I can assure you the cost is huge... I shot a simple fashion Editorial for Oyster in Malibu.. permit costs were $1850 (as there are 2 permit jurisdictions to deal with .. Malibu & LA County)... we were also required to have a monitor from Malibu at $46ph plus $83ph for a Malibu cop.... total cost for the day.... $2600 for the 6 hours we were there.

NYC has been known for the film friendly policies... however my understanding is that the policies have been changed to the tripod rule.... if a tripod is used fees are payable.

I do not allow unknown individuals from Craigs List access to business information... I dont spend a half day filling out applications... it takes literally 1 hour max. If a permit is complex, I use a permitting Agency such as Denise Wheeler in LA.

Jan 12 10 01:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
the main purpose of the permitting system from the permitting authority's perspective is to verify insurance & to reduce liability. Shooting congestion is the secondary consideration.

I'll consider this to be fair when other potentially dangerous public activity is subject to the same.

Why should a city be concerned about a photography over other everyday activity that is equally or more dangerous?

And I understand that when other activity is done commercially, equivalent permits and insurance are required, the difference being that those involved in other activities on a smaller scale aren't asked to prove their non-commercial intent.

Jan 12 10 01:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photography by BE
Posts: 5,652
Midland, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
Your understanding of the permit system is not accurate... the main purpose of the permitting system from the permitting authority's perspective is to verify insurance & to reduce liability. Shooting congestion is the secondary consideration.

I dont know many colleagues that are happy with the permitting systems in place.... our fees tend to be much higher as we are shooting commercially... consider this additional cost as subsidizing fees for amateurs.... Students are normally exempt from fees but are normally required to have a physical paper permit.

smile  Do not try to confuse some people with facts, their minds are already made up.

Jan 12 10 01:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


Chili wrote:

i know silvia...you dont have to pay a $100 fee!!!!!! go back and re-read the instructions!!! but you also need to fill out the indemnity clause...its not a big deal

you can do everything via email too

Funny how I was asked for a cheque by FilMiami as they were issuing the blanket permits for City of Miami... City of Miami Beach & Dade County. Please feel free to contact Sandy Lighterman @ FilMiami to verify

~~~

Marc,

The indemnity is for City of Miami Beach ONLY. The form is attached…. It’s the “thing” on Miami Beach. Make sure you send that directly to Silvia Royer at City of Miami Beach Film Office 305-673-7070. 31st street beach is also a Silvia Royer question.

Why don’t you phone Haulover Beach directly? They will be able to quote you the correct fees for what the particular requirements of your shoot will be. The fee should be not more than $260 + parking fess. The contact at Haulover is either Mike Dmytriw or Steve Sider 305-947-3525.

Sincerely,
Sandy Lighterman
Film and Entertainment Permit Coordinator
Miami-Dade Office of Film and Entertainment
111 N.W. 1st Street
Suite 2200
Miami, Florida 33128
305-375-3288
Fax 305-375-3266

www.filmiami.org

Jan 12 10 01:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


Photography by BE wrote:
smile  Do not try to confuse some people with facts, their minds are already made up.

Yes, I've made my mind up that:

1. The system stinks as it is.

2. Others like ganging up on those who point this out.

Jan 12 10 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

I'll consider this to be fair when other potentially dangerous public activity is subject to the same.

Why should a city be concerned about a photography over other everyday activity that is equally or more dangerous?

And I understand that when other activity is done commercially, equivalent permits and insurance are required, the difference being that those involved in other activities on a smaller scale aren't asked to prove their non-commercial intent.

You can argue about what should be... unfortunately ... IT IS WHAT IT IS!

There is a system in place... I dont particularly agree with it but its there so I have to deal with it... arguing about the philosophy behind the requirement doesnt change the fact that permits are required.

Jan 12 10 01:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
You can argue about what should be... unfortunately ... IT IS WHAT IT IS!

There is a system in place... I dont particularly agree with it but its there so I have to deal with it... arguing about the philosophy behind the requirement doesnt change the fact that permits are required.

So what's wrong with exposing injustice? That's how others not yet affected, such as the OP, are educated and forearmed:

MIA OZ wrote:
Thank you so much for all your replies and thoughts - all are well taken and gives me an idea on how this topic is handled form different perspectives.  Thanks to all again.

And since the subject comes up often, some things bear repeating.

If we were like some special interests, we'd be educating newbies while standing together to bring about change. I can give many examples such as the NRA, AARP, AAA, Ducks Unlimited, and Critical Mass. A few concerned individuals writing Congress is not going to make a dent.

Jan 12 10 01:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

So what's wrong with exposing injustice? That's how others not yet affected, such as the OP of this thread, are educated and forearmed.

And since the subject comes up often, some things bear repeating.

If we were like some special interests, we'd be educating newbies while standing together to bring about change. I can give many examples such as the NRA, Ducks Unlimited, and Critical Mass.

A few concerned individuals writing Congress is not going to make a dent.

Well you go ahead & crusade against "injustice" if you choose.... I'll just get on business, deal with the system that is there & make $$$.... my clients dont give a shit about how unjust the permit system is... LOL!

Jan 12 10 01:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
Well you go ahead & crusade against "injustice" if you choose.... I'll just get on business, deal with the system that is there & make $$$.... my clients dont give a shit about how unjust the permit system is... LOL!

I guess it's all business and no passion for you.

Take a look at things from the perspective of a high-end recreational shooter and you might feel more fire.

Jan 12 10 01:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

I guess it's all business and no passion for you.

Take a look at things from the perspective of a high-end recreational shooter and you might feel more fire.

Explain to me why Business & Passion are mutually exclusive to one another?

Why is it my responsibility to be concerned with YOUR personal agenda?

*shakes head

Jan 12 10 02:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photography by BE
Posts: 5,652
Midland, Texas, US


A few years ago  I added to my building, and I had to get a building permit.  Last winter I had to have a gas line replaced and the plumber had to get a permit. This past summer I had a new AC/heating system installed, and yet another permit was required.

Every person that performed the work was a trained professional, and had many years experience in doing their job, and none complained about having to get a permit.

When you get into any profession or work there may be certain requirements, such as obtaining a sales tax permit, or some other requirement in order to be in business.  It is all part of doing business, and it seems that those who just want to do it for fun are the ones who scream about injustices, and whine.  smile

No need to even go into why permits are required, because this has topic has been beaten to death... no beaten to a pulp; to a bloody pulp.
Jan 12 10 02:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JEBKA Photography
Posts: 3,974
Firestone, Colorado, US


I get permits where needed.  Not that big a deal
Jan 12 10 02:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Marcus Studios
Posts: 8,427
Los Angeles, California, US


If I want to catch fish, I need a fishing permit

If I want to go into business, I need a business permit

If I want to shoot a duck, I need a hunting permit

If I want to shoot pictures on public property or a beach, I need a photo permit



What's the big deal ?
Jan 12 10 02:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photography by BE
Posts: 5,652
Midland, Texas, US


Ken Marcus Studios wrote:
If I want to catch fish, I need a fishing permit

If I want to go into business, I need a business permit

If I want to shoot a duck, I need a hunting permit

If I want to shoot pictures on public property or a beach, I need a photo permit



What's the big deal ?

The big deal is that some guys want to go out with a model, a camera, a tripod, light stand(s) with an umbrella, a reflector, then set up in a park or street or sidewalk, and bitch about the fact that they are not making any money; they are just a casual shooter.. just shooting for fun, so they should be exempt from any rules.

Jan 12 10 02:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


H3D PHOTOGRAPHER wrote:
Why is it my responsibility to be concerned with YOUR personal agenda?

*shakes head

Because you belong to a community of people with a common interest but diverse individual outlooks. Perhaps the system works fine for some of you, but it it's a needless "killjoy" for others.

As a community, we should each look out for each other and work towards rules that accommodate most of our situations. This should be quite attainable, and I gave a few workable suggestions earlier in the thread.

Jan 12 10 02:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


Ken Marcus Studios wrote:
If I want to catch fish, I need a fishing permit

If I want to go into business, I need a business permit

If I want to shoot a duck, I need a hunting permit

If I want to shoot pictures on public property or a beach, I need a photo permit



What's the big deal ?

Hunting and fishing consume limited resources, not to mention that the permits are more universal and less costly.

Commercial business can have serious impact on customers and those nearby, and needs to be regulated.

A major film production or elaborate shoot has aspects of the above, but many shoots that fall under the requirements do not, meaning they are subject to all the disadvantages without having the benefits.

Photography by BE wrote:
A few years ago  I added to my building, and I had to get a building permit.  Last winter I had to have a gas line replaced and the plumber had to get a permit. This past summer I had a new AC/heating system installed, and yet another permit was required.

Every person that performed the work was a trained professional, and had many years experience in doing their job, and none complained about having to get a permit.

Few if any people practice those trades for fun or recreation, and almost all work for pay. Therefore, everyone involved is aware of and understands regulations.

Jan 12 10 02:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photography by BE
Posts: 5,652
Midland, Texas, US


rp_photo wrote:
Hunting and fishing consume limited resources, not to mention that the permits are more universal and less costly.

Commercial business can have serious impact on customers and those nearby, and needs to be regulated.

A major film production or elaborate shoot has aspects of the above, but many shoots that fall under the requirements do not, meaning they are subject to all the disadvantages without having the benefits.

I have seen photos of your set up. You take (or used to) a tripod, a light stand with umbrella, and power pack, and a camera bag.   Yet you think you should have special privileges and not have to get a permit.  How the heck are the authorities suppose to know you are not a professional.  That is.. that you are not making money from photography.

You have been shooting models for what 5 years?  and have shot over 300 models?

If is not the fault of anyone who issues permits that you do not make money.  They have no responsibility to have a special "dispensation"   just for you or anyone else.

Jan 12 10 02:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photography by BE
Posts: 5,652
Midland, Texas, US


rp_photo wrote:
Few if any people practice those trades for fun or recreation, and almost all work for pay. Therefore, everyone involved is aware of and understands regulations.

You understand them, as do many others, but just want to complain about them.

It is not a matter of not understanding, really. 

What difference does it make that you do not make money?  You take more equipment to a shoot that many full time pros.  Why should it matter to anyone that you are still shooting for fun?  Why should "fun-timers" have special privileges?

Give me one good reason why?

Jan 12 10 02:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
H5D PHOTOGRAPHER
Posts: 3,837
Gig Harbor, Washington, US


rp_photo wrote:

Because you belong to a community of people with a common interest but diverse individual outlooks. Perhaps the system works fine for some of you, but it it's a needless "killjoy" for others.

As a community, we should each look out for each other and work towards rules that accommodate most of our situations. This should be quite attainable, and I gave a few workable suggestions earlier in the thread.

RFLMAO... The permit system is there so get over it & stop your whining... if you want to change the way things are done with regards to film permits, complaining on the MM forums is not going to achieve much so you are wasting your breath.

Your point of view is clear ... you dont see why YOU should have to pay for a permit... so the rules need to be changed to accommodate YOU! Yeah good luck with that!


~~~~~

To the OP...

In Miami specifically ... there are 3 main permit authorities a photographer needs to deal with.. City of Miami Beach, City of Miami & Dade County... call Sandy Lighterman & have a chat with her. She is a former Producer & an excellent resource for location suggestions as well as helping with the permit process.

Sandy Lighterman
Film and Entertainment Permit Coordinator
Miami-Dade Office of Film and Entertainment
111 N.W. 1st Street
Suite 2200
Miami, Florida 33128
305-375-3288


All the best smile

Jan 12 10 02:44 pm  Link  Quote 
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