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Makeup Artist
Noney none none none
Posts: 12
Chicago, Illinois, US


I just did a photo shoot yesterday and a airbrush artist came in and did his work.  I have noticed an increased trend with Airbrush Makeup (Glamour, etc.), and would love to start learning that!

What's your thoughts on the subject?  Anyone have any good/bad stories on it? 

K
Jul 23 06 06:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Suellen
Posts: 213
Arlington, Georgia, US


Well, im not a stylist/MUA but i had my makeup done by airbrush for a photoshoot today.
incredible coverage; and was flawless...of course im sure the MUA's technique had much to do with it too.  It seemed to take 1/2 the time as regular makeup and she was able to fix the tan lines so they werent noticeable.
Can't wait to see the pics!
I think the makeup line was called 'Kevi'....im not sure.
Jul 23 06 06:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Loretta Kendall A Salon
Posts: 148
Ohio, Illinois, US


Good question. I would like to try it also. I'd like to see it done and take some classes. Anyone know of any?
Jul 23 06 06:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
About Faces-Lynn
Posts: 957
Detroit, Michigan, US


I know in NYC Tobi Britton from The Makeup Shop has a airbrush workshop and she is a master at it.

Also MUD in NYC has Airbrush workshops available.
Jul 23 06 06:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
About Faces-Lynn
Posts: 957
Detroit, Michigan, US


Suellen wrote:
Well, im not a stylist/MUA but i had my makeup done by airbrush for a photoshoot today.
incredible coverage; and was flawless...of course im sure the MUA's technique had much to do with it too.  It seemed to take 1/2 the time as regular makeup and she was able to fix the tan lines so they werent noticeable.
Can't wait to see the pics!
I think the makeup line was called 'Kevi'....im not sure.

Are you perhaps meaning the line was called KETT???
Link for there site is www.kettcosmetics.com

As far as airbushes go the Iwata is one of the best compressors you can get. Make sure you get a top feed brush also.

Jul 23 06 06:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Jessica Steele
Posts: 370
Los Angeles, California, US


Personally, I don't use airbrushing- ever. I don't like the way it feels (on my face) and I don't want to run the risk of having that suffocating, pore blocking, feeling leave my subjects uncomfortable- or worse, leave thier skin irritated for thier work or auditions in future days.
Plus I think I'm great at applying makeup the old fashioned way. I make flawless skin and great contours with better control.
Just my two cents.
Jul 23 06 07:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Tracey Masterson
Posts: 553
Shelton, Connecticut, US


I love airbrushing and I love how it feels on me.  Models love it.  It requires about 4-5 drops of makeup and the coverage is flawless.  If it feels heavy or "suffocating", I am sure the person was being heavy handed.  It feels like nothing on.  It is not for everything, but it has it's time and place.
Jul 23 06 07:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
stylist man
Posts: 34,372
New York, New York, US


The topic is a bit different but for those who use the airbrush for bodypainting here is a list of threads already on the topic.

list of body paint / bodypaint threads
http://www.modelmayhem.com/posts.php?thread_id=46466
Jul 23 06 09:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
stylist man
Posts: 34,372
New York, New York, US


Here is my question.

If you were going to have a battle of a airbrush makeup artist,  (face makeup not body paint)

Against

A traditional makeup artist.

What would be the advantages each would hold over the other?

Not necessarily who would win but what are the benefits of each.
Maybe already partially answered,  just putting the question a different way.

I guess for one would be the need for a power supply.

Is one really faster than the other?

What about clean up time?
Which is faster?  Is airbrushing more sanitary?
Jul 23 06 09:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Cool Artist2005
Posts: 468
Dumont, New Jersey, US


I have done it for two photoshoots and all my brides now ask for the airbrush.....it has really increased my business
Jul 23 06 10:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joe Alcantar
Posts: 438
Beaumont, California, US


Luisa's Make-up is air brushed on .  Guy did a great job on her.

joe
Jul 23 06 10:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Casting Director
GRACE KOFTEKIAN
Posts: 3,925


Jessica Steele wrote:
Personally, I don't use airbrushing- ever. I don't like the way it feels (on my face) and I don't want to run the risk of having that suffocating, pore blocking, feeling leave my subjects uncomfortable- or worse, leave thier skin irritated for thier work or auditions in future days.
Plus I think I'm great at applying makeup the old fashioned way. I make flawless skin and great contours with better control.
Just my two cents.

If these are your results you've gotten in the past, then you haven't used the airbrush correctly.
"Pushing" foundation around on the surface of the skin by hand/sponge/brush is far more "pore-clogging" and invasive than spraying a light veil over the surface.
It sounds like you're "over-spraying", spraying too close or that your PSI is set too high.
You might consider taking a refresher class in airbrush techniques.  The technology and products used have changed drastically in the past few years.

MHana wrote:
Here is my question.

If you were going to have a battle of a airbrush makeup artist,  (face makeup not body paint)

Against

A traditional makeup artist.

What would be the advantages each would hold over the other?

Airbrush allows you a much more delicate variance of colors and depth.  With an airbrush you can "underpaint" a face to create contours and subtle colors that won't be noticed by the naked eye (or on HDV).  This is why it's been so widely embraced by the bridal makeup business.  Brides are seen in-person (not just in photos) and don't want to look "made-up".  Airbrushing allows for a level of perfection without the heavy "hand" application needed to correct and balance skintones and cover imperfections (dark circles, discoloration, birthmarks, etc.)


MHana wrote:
I guess for one would be the need for a power supply.

This is a very valid issue.  But a number of companies are working on battery powered compressors (I've seen a Temptu prototype and it looks awesome).


MHana wrote:
Is one really faster than the other?

My foundation application time is drastically cut down.  It will normally take me 1/3 of the time to airbrush as opposed to hand apply.  When I was keying "As The World Turns", a normal "male" makeup application was about 7-10 minutes by hand...about 3 minutes by airbrush.


MHana wrote:
What about clean up time?

If you know what you're doing, cleaning your airbrush takes no longer than cleaning your makeup brushes.


MHana wrote:
Is airbrushing more sanitary?

The makeup goes from the container into a stainless steel feed cup and is sprayed on.  There are no (possibly) dirty sponges or brushes used, so issues of cross contamination are greatly (if not completely) reduced.


I don't airbrush all the time.  I do, however, like having the option available when I feel the need for it.

Jul 24 06 09:56 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


Jessica Steele wrote:
Personally, I don't use airbrushing- ever. I don't like the way it feels (on my face) and I don't want to run the risk of having that suffocating, pore blocking, feeling leave my subjects uncomfortable- or worse, leave thier skin irritated for thier work or auditions in future days.
Plus I think I'm great at applying makeup the old fashioned way. I make flawless skin and great contours with better control.
Just my two cents.

I took a look at your port and your foundation work is beautiful, but...
If what you've explained above are the results you've gotten from airbrushing in the past, then you haven't used the airbrush correctly.

"Pushing" foundation around on the skin by hand/sponge/brush is far more "pore-clogging" and invasive than spraying a light veil on the surface.
From your comment, it sounds like you're "over-spraying", spraying too close or that your PSI is set too high.
You might consider taking a refresher class in airbrush techniques.  The technology and products used have changed drastically in the past few years.

MHana wrote:
Here is my question.

If you were going to have a battle of a airbrush makeup artist,  (face makeup not body paint)

Against

A traditional makeup artist.

What would be the advantages each would hold over the other?

Airbrush allows you a much more delicate variance of colors and depth.  With an airbrush you can "underpaint" a face to create contours and subtle colors that won't be noticed by the naked eye (or on HDV).  Especially when you use a silicone based product like Temptu SB.  This is why it's been so widely embraced by the bridal makeup business.  Brides are seen in-person (not just in photos) and don't want to look "made-up".  Airbrushing allows for a level of perfection without the heavy "hand" application needed to correct and balance skintones and cover imperfections (dark circles, discoloration, birthmarks, etc.)


MHana wrote:
I guess for one would be the need for a power supply.

This is a very valid issue.  But a number of companies are working on battery powered compressors (I've seen prototypes and it looks awesome).


MHana wrote:
Is one really faster than the other?

My foundation application time is drastically cut down.  It will normally take me 1/3 of the time to airbrush as opposed to hand apply.  When I was keying "As The World Turns", a normal "male" makeup application was about 7-10 minutes by hand...about 3 minutes by airbrush.


MHana wrote:
What about clean up time?

If you know what you're doing, cleaning your airbrush takes no longer than cleaning your makeup brushes.


MHana wrote:
Is airbrushing more sanitary?

The makeup goes from the container into a stainless steel feed cup and is sprayed on.  There are no (possibly) dirty sponges or brushes used, so issues of cross contamination are greatly (if not completely) reduced.


I don't airbrush all the time.  I do, however, like having the option available when I feel the need for it.

Jul 24 06 09:57 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Jessica Steele
Posts: 370
Los Angeles, California, US


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:

Jessica Steele wrote:
Personally, I don't use airbrushing- ever. I don't like the way it feels (on my face) and I don't want to run the risk of having that suffocating, pore blocking, feeling leave my subjects uncomfortable- or worse, leave thier skin irritated for thier work or auditions in future days.
Plus I think I'm great at applying makeup the old fashioned way. I make flawless skin and great contours with better control.
Just my two cents.

If these are the results you've gotten in the past, then you haven't used the airbrush correctly.
"Pushing" foundation around on the surface of the skin by hand/sponge/brush is far more "pore-clogging" and invasive than spraying a light veil over the surface.
It sounds like you're "over-spraying", spraying too close or that your PSI is set too high.
You might consider taking a refresher class in airbrush techniques.  The technology and products used have changed drastically in the past few years.

Sorry Kevin- you misread my post. I have had airbrushing applied to my face (for an eight hour shoot) and felt very uncomfortable by the end of the day. It didn't feel good on my skin under the lights all day and it was creasing and even flaking in places (it was applied to my arms, hand, legs, and feet as well). This was a commercial for the Home Shopping Network. It got all over the clothes as well. From this experience, soley, I have made a decision to not work with airbrushing.
I do, however, believe I am just as efficient with traditional makeup.

Jul 24 06 10:08 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


Jessica Steele wrote:
Sorry Kevin- you misread my post. I have had airbrushing applied to my face (for an eight hour shoot) and felt very uncomfortable by the end of the day. It didn't feel good on my skin under the lights all day and it was creasing and even flaking in places (it was applied to my arms, hand, legs, and feet as well). This was a commercial for the Home Shopping Network. It got all over the clothes as well. From this experience, soley, I have made a decision to not work with airbrushing.

Sorry for the confusion.

But, whoever did that to you did a lousy job and should have their airbrush taken away.  You should have felt nothing on your skin.
 
I can't count how many models, actors, etc. have told me that they LOVE the way airbrush makeup feels and that it is so much lighter and more comfortable than traditional applications.
This article is a few years old, but i think it's a pretty good testimonial to how most people feel about having their makeup airbrushed.
http://makeup.kjbennett.com/dinair.htm

NOTE: There have been major technological advances in airbrush makeup since this article was printed. I no longer use Dinair products.  I use Temptu SB as my primary airbrush foundation now.

Jul 24 06 10:20 am  Link  Quote 
Model
plusmodelnicole
Posts: 2
Jersey City, New Jersey, US


Jul 24 06 10:26 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
nhlebris
Posts: 1


I think it's great for body painting. I bought one four years ago at the makeup artist trade show out in CA. I haven't really used it except for playing around. I think it's best for tv studio's or on a film set where you have your stuff the same place everyday and your working on the same person. For me to lug around the compressor and equipt in the subway and do all the cleaning afterward and evertime I change foundation colors when I'm on location is not worth it. I just don't think the difference is drastic enough. It's not as simple as soon air brush users make it out to be.. cleaning it takes alot more time than tossing a sponge in the garbage or running a foundation brush under warm water and cleaner.  But for body painting it's a world of difference. And I can see how it's great for artists who do weddings since brides like the fanciness of it. If I had a car maybe i would be using it more.
Jul 24 06 10:31 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


nhlebris wrote:
I think it's best for tv studio's or on a film set where you have your stuff the same place everyday and your working on the same person. For me to lug around the compressor and equipt in the subway and do all the cleaning afterward and evertime I change foundation colors when I'm on location is not worth it..... If I had a car maybe i would be using it more.

My Kett-Jet (http://kettcosmetics.com) weighs 2.7 lbs and is approx. the size of a large brick of Velvetta (let's see who get's that reference...lol).  I also have a "spray-off" container for emptying and cleaning my airbrush between colors.  All of my "face and body detailing" equipment weighs less than 5lbs and is compltetly portable.

Unfortunately the Kett-Jet only sprays up to 13 PSI.  For full body painting, I have to take my Iwata Smart Jet (http://temptu.com) which goes up to 35 PSI and weighs about 8 lbs.

Jul 24 06 10:50 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Makeup Artist
Mary
Posts: 7,117
Coronado, California, US


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:
My Kett-Jet (http://kettcosmetics.com) weighs 2.7 lbs and is approx. the size of a large brick of Velvetta (let's see who get's that reference...lol).  I also have a "spray-off" container for emptying and cleaning my airbrush between colors.  All of my "face and body detailing" equipment weighs less than 5lbs and is compltetly portable.

Unfortunately the Kett-Jet only sprays up to 13 PSI.  For full body painting, I have to take my Iwata Smart Jet which goes up to 35 PSI and weighs about 8 lbs.

Hmmmmm, large brick of Velvetta, Great on crackers LOL!    Ok, so, I'll jump into this debate since I have been doing airbrush for about 8 years.

   I HATE AIRBRUSHING because it's a pain in the Arse....cleaning, taking it apart, lugging extra foundations and equipment (I know its not large, I alwo have a Kett compresser as well as 4 or 5 other brands LOL! )   On the other hand, the clients and models seem to like it better overall.  They say it feels light on, like nothing so I agree with Kevin that the person Jessica had must have been heavy handed. 

On a TV or film set, airbrushing is great....you set it on the counter and it stays there for days or weeks, you line up the makeup for your talent and everyone has their own little bottle, no guess work....  In print you have to pack it every day and take it home, clean it good etc....   so I think as a print artist its harder to use. 

  Most clients are impressed with the gadget and think youre a better artist for using it....  I can apply pretty darn good without it but its the perception that matters with the client and so when I really want to impress someone on the job, I cart the thing.

Jul 24 06 11:02 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
Roustan
Posts: 1,083
Pawtucket, Rhode Island, US


I like airbrushing, but I'm biased. And Yes this is blatant self promotion!

But really, airbrushing can do a lot of things quicker, cleaner, and more smoothly than traditional makeup. And now with the HDTV craze it's becoming less of a trend and more of a requirement because the high Definition makes it easy to see the traditional makeup. Airbrushing looks more natural.
Jul 24 06 11:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Zpab PhotographyArt
Posts: 32
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


It's the future of Cosmetics. I'm going to be investing in a company that has produce a
pure - all natural version. So if any of you need some mobile kits within a few months
or less please just let me know - I can send you one.

As far as quality of how it appears on Camera and how it makes the models look -
One word: Superior!

Zpab
Jul 24 06 11:13 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,847
San Francisco, California, US


Just for the record, it is possible to use airbrush in locations without electricity...CO2 tanks are quite functional, if a bit on the heavy side.

~Rich
Jul 26 06 12:30 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
liz yu
Posts: 1,902
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


has anyone used the iwata silver jet?  do you like it?
i've used kett before so i wanted to know how they compare to each other..
Jul 26 06 01:30 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


liz yu wrote:
has anyone used the iwata silver jet?  do you like it?
i've used kett before so i wanted to know how they compare to each other..

The Iwata Silver Jet only goes up to 18 PSI and weighs over 6 lbs.  If you're looking for a highly portable unit for primarily doing face and body detail you might as well get a Kett Jett (up to 13 PSI and 2 1/2 lbs.) and save the additional weight.

If you're looking to do more "full body" painting then you need a unit that has a much higher PSI.
I have one comment to make about the Iwata Smart Jet...I LOVE IT. 
It weighs in at a hefty 8 lbs., but it goes from 1-35 PSI in a flash.  It also has what they call "Smart Jet" technology (fancy way of saying it turns itself off when not in use).

I have the Kett Jett and the Iwata Smart Jet.  Having both allows me the freedom to airbrush whenever I want to.

Jul 26 06 08:15 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


OMG!!!
I just gave advice!!!
WTF was I thinking???

(his eyes widen as perspiration begins to appear on his upper lip...
he shivers as if thrown into a Sub Zero freezer, with optional in-door purified water dispenser...
he covers his eyes as he waits for the first (non) MUA to correct him...)
Jul 26 06 08:21 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
liz yu
Posts: 1,902
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:

The Iwata Silver Jet only goes up to 18 PSI and weighs over 6 lbs.  If you're looking for a highly portable unit for primarily doing face and body detail you might as well get a Kett Jett (up to 13 PSI and 2 1/2 lbs.) and save the additional weight.

If you're looking to do more "full body" painting then you need a unit that has a much higher PSI.
I have one comment to make about the Iwata Smart Jet...I LOVE IT. 
It weighs in at a hefty 8 lbs., but it goes from 1-35 PSI in a flash.  It also has what they call "Smart Jet" technology (fancy way of saying it turns itself off when not in use).

I have the Kett Jett and the Iwata Smart Jet.  Having both allows me the freedom to airbrush whenever I want to.

ooooooh this is great kevin!!  i did love the kett for it's light weight!  i think i'll stick to that one for the face.  thx kevin!

Jul 26 06 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
liz yu
Posts: 1,902
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:
OMG!!!
I just gave advice!!!
WTF was I thinking???

(his eyes widen as perspiration begins to appear on his upper lip...
he shivers as if thrown into a Sub Zero freezer, with optional in-door purified water dispenser...
he covers his eyes as he waits for the first (non) MUA to correct him...)

uh oh.. (laying kevin down and putting a warm towel on his forehead)  somebody help!!

Jul 26 06 01:45 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Makeup Artist
Mary
Posts: 7,117
Coronado, California, US


liz yu wrote:
uh oh.. (laying kevin down and putting a warm towel on his forehead)  somebody help!!

STAY BACK!!!! Mary yells (standing over Kevin in her MIB pose pointing high powered CHI blow dryer at any photographer or model that dares come near)

http://bestsmileys.com/shooting1/25.gif

Jul 26 06 01:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Rhonda M
Posts: 1,089
Baltimore, Maryland, US


Mary wrote:

STAY BACK!!!! Mary yells (standing over Kevin in her MIB pose pointing high powered CHI blow dryer at any photographer or model that dares come near)

http://bestsmileys.com/shooting1/25.gif

ROTFLMAO!!!!!

Jul 26 06 02:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
LisaJohnson
Posts: 10,525
Nashville, Tennessee, US


I have worked with several photographers that prefer traditional makeup application over airbrush.  I'm not sure why each one has that preference, but...one photographer in general thinks the artist touch cannot be duplicated on film/print.  He feels it's a more artistic (if you will) expression.  Most of the photogs are into more realism and artistic nudes...they don't particularly mind airbrush of the body, but for face they have said they prefer traditional application.

I have Dior Airflash and it has incredible results on skin.  I guess I'm not mechanically inclined...i'd probably put an eye out with an airbrush...LOL...best left to the experts.

It's a very interesting subject.
Jul 31 06 12:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Juliana R
Posts: 116
New York, New York, US


I had airbrushed make-up for 1 of my photoshoots in Chicago.  It didn't take as long as regular make-up and it was flawless.  In the prints, it had a "clean" look.

I didn't pay attention to the brand of make-up used, I wish I did. 

Just from a model's point of view, I loved it!!!

~JulieAnn~
Jul 31 06 12:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Dawn Aisha
Posts: 56
Houston, Texas, US


Airbrushed mu has been around a lot longer than we think- it's actually nothing new.  I personally don't care for it based on how it looks after the fact..its not too hot, especailly if the subject has wrinkles..every crack and crevice is now more obvious than usual.  I give it a negative hands down.
Aug 01 06 10:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,847
San Francisco, California, US


DawnAisha wrote:
Airbrushed mu has been around a lot longer than we think- it's actually nothing new.  I personally don't care for it based on how it looks after the fact..its not too hot, especailly if the subject has wrinkles..every crack and crevice is now more obvious than usual.  I give it a negative hands down.

Airbrush and wrinkles can be an issue. In the history dept... I was once speaking to Marvin Westmore, and he said he found photos of his father doing airbrush makeup for Gone With The Wind. Considering airbushes in their modern form are only 100-120 years old...that is a ways back.

Airbrush is a tool, it's what you do with it that matters.

Aug 02 06 02:07 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Tracey Masterson
Posts: 553
Shelton, Connecticut, US


Rich, I tell people that Gone With the Wind story all the time!  (didn't hear it first-hand though! lol) 
In response to the wrinkles, again, this is a lack of training and practice.  And it is pretty much impossible to put someone's eye out with an airbrush.  You really shouldn't be that close to the skin anyway.
Listen, here is the deal:
Putting an airbrush in the hands of a novice is like putting a McQueen gown on a 5'3" model with a bad attitude.    It doesn't work.  Again, if the makeup is cracking or too thick or is clearly visible on the skin, you are applying it incorrectly.
Older skin can positively glow with the proper application.

It's also the same when people will see a great picture and email the makeup artist to find out what product they used.  You can be given the tools, but you need to know how to use them.
Aug 02 06 08:09 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


Tracey Masterson wrote:
Putting an airbrush in the hands of a novice is like putting a McQueen gown on a 5'3" model with a bad attitude.    It doesn't work.  Again, if the makeup is cracking or too thick or is clearly visible on the skin, you are applying it incorrectly.
Older skin can positively glow with the proper application.

It's also the same when people will see a great picture and email the makeup artist to find out what product they used.  You can be given the tools, but you need to know how to use them.

I'm so glad you addressed this. 
I've had much more success airbrushing "mature" skin as opposed to pushing foundation into the creases and wrinkles with a sponge or a makeup brush.  The airbrush finish is so much more flattering and youthful looking.  If you master the tools, you can achieve beautiful results.

Aug 02 06 10:18 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
David Klasfeld
Posts: 2,665
New York, New York, US


Hi All-

As a new member (and as both an airbrush makeup artist and the owner of an airbrush makeup line), I wanted to weigh in on this topic.

The best news I can give you about airbrush makeup is that it's actually quite easy! The most intimidating part of the process is mastering the hardware, which at first can seem intimidating. With proper instruction, you'll easily learn the ins and outs of the equipment, and soon find that the process of applying makeup with it amounts to little more than pointing and spraying. Maintaining the right distance from the skin, the correct motion of your hand, and the right pressure or airflow from the gun are important too, but these are also techniques that are easily mastered with practice.

What the airbrush does is not magic, nor is it overly complicated: it is simply applying a very concentrated makeup very sheerly, and very evenly. The result is the ability to achieve even total, full-on coverage with a minimum of product, so that what you see on camera is perfect skin and very little makeup. This is the true advantage of the makeup, and not its longevity contrary to popular belief.

For this reason, the best use for the airbrush is to probably to apply foundation (and maybe a little blush, highlight, and contour), or to use whenever you need to lay down a lot of color very quickly and evenly (i.e. Body Painting, Special F/X,Temporary Tattoos and other Stencil/Makeup applications).

For each application, you'll want to choose the right type of product. Different formulas will serve different purposes: just as you would never want to carry just matte eyeshadows in your kit, or just frost & shimmers, you'll probably want several different textures and finishes in your airbrush makeup as well. You can rely on Water Bases for a full day's wear, though they should of course be washed off before bedtime like any other cosmetic product. Alcohol Bases are usually sweatproof and waterproof, and can last on the skin anywhere from 24 hours to 7 days with appropriate application and care.  Resist the thinking that a formula that 'freeze' in place and 'doesn't move all day' is necessarily the best for foundation application for example; while this sounds good in theory, the likelihood that you'll need to touch up the makeup at some point (the model rubs her eyes or blows her nose, someone kisses her on the cheek and leaves a lipstick print) means that if your makeup doesn't budge, you've got a problem.   

Another reason airbrush makeup works so well on camera is because of the spray-dot patter that the airbrush puts down on the skin. It was way back in the early 1900s when Phoebe Walkup, a hobbyist photographer noticed that it was near identical to the grain of film, and began to use it and popularize it for retouching photographs, which is why the terms 'airbrush' and 'retouch' often get used interchangeably. Both airbrushes and cameras have advanced monumentally since that time: In the wake of technological advantages including Hi-Definition Television and Digital Photography, cameras are able to pick up an incredible amount of detail on skin - when blown up on big screen television, billboards, etc., your work is exposed to more scrutiny then would normally be noticeable with the naked eye.

What this all means to you: Don't panic! The right tools are now readily available to the artist and it only takes a short time to master the technique necessary to work with them. This doesn't mean that you need to unlearn everything else you know about makeup, and it doesn't mean everything in your kit gets tossed in favor of its airbrush counterpart. It is first and foremost a great foundation brush and has a few other tricks up its sleeve too. It will never replace the other brushes in your brush belt, its just a great new addition.

While some artists may use the airbrush for more delicate purposes, like lipstick and eyeshadow for example, my personal belief is that there are better tools (like plain old makeup brushes!) for that purpose. Even if you can master this technique (and find a product that doesn't crease on the lids), you've now locked both yourself or your client into touching all of their makeup up with an airbrush, and as a working artist myself, you won't always have the luxury of being able to do that.

My advice at the end of the day is to get out there, and begin using an airbrush as soon as possible. In addition to all of the above, it cuts your application time in half, and is a great way to market yourself: photographers with a good understanding of retouching know the value of a good airbrush makeup artist. Don't expect your airbrush to be the Magic Brush in your kit. It's just yet another great tool in your arsenal as an artist. You're still the one in control.

As always, any questions, don't hesitate to ask me here, or directly at david@occmakeup.com

Thanks!
DK
Aug 06 06 12:01 pm  Link  Quote 
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