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Makeup Artist
Lottie
Posts: 953


ok..kill me..I can't figure out how to do a search within the forums and I am sure this has probably been asked before...

is it absolutely necessary to use airbrush makeup in an airbrush or is it a gimmick? I know this is a bad example, but I have seen shows like Project Runway where the makeup artists are using regular liquid foundation in their airbrushes...does this ruin the airbrush? Does it need to be diluted?

I am seriously looking into getting an airbrush after years of contemplating it and just have a few of these silly questions I need answered first.

Thanks in advance
**L**
Aug 06 06 11:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
LMA
Posts: 127
Los Angeles, California, US


i wish i knew...hmm good question. at first i thought it was a gimmick also, but then i've seen some pretty good airbrush work.  i dont know, if you find out let me know?! i may consider learning it as well if it's really that beneficial

good luck
LMA
Aug 06 06 11:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Rayrayrose
Posts: 3,510
Los Angeles, California, US


I have never bought airbrush foundations before, it was just a matter of playing mad scientist and figuiring out what formula works best. When I was still in make-up school I went all crazy for the mac select spf, and then soon after I decided that I hated it. So I just thinned it with water put a little super sealer in the mix, and put it through my airbrush. Which works fine for photoshoots, but we all know that MAC foundation is super flakey so it just doesnt hold up. Usually you can take whatever the base of the make-up is and thin the foundation out. My friend is sponsored by NARS and he just waters down their foundation and puts it through an airbrush. You can use 244 to thin out silicone based foundations (hyperreal, face atelier, colorstay), but for most things water works. Just make sure to clean the airbrush with whatever the base of the product you are using is... if it is waterbased use water,,, silicone based... use 244 fluid.

I am looking into getting the Temptu SB stuff, they have a "starter" set of 1/4 jars of all the colors for pretty cheap.
Aug 06 06 11:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
ChristyR
Posts: 182
Los Angeles, California, US


I'm also looking to getting an airbrush, It's not a demand, but would to have it anyways.

Here is a website, that offers airbrush makeup.
http://thetanningstore.com/category.aspx?categoryID=214
Aug 07 06 12:30 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lottie
Posts: 953


rachelrose wrote:
I have never bought airbrush foundations before, it was just a matter of playing mad scientist and figuiring out what formula works best. When I was still in make-up school I went all crazy for the mac select spf, and then soon after I decided that I hated it. So I just thinned it with water put a little super sealer in the mix, and put it through my airbrush. Which works fine for photoshoots, but we all know that MAC foundation is super flakey so it just doesnt hold up. Usually you can take whatever the base of the make-up is and thin the foundation out. My friend is sponsored by NARS and he just waters down their foundation and puts it through an airbrush. You can use 244 to thin out silicone based foundations (hyperreal, face atelier, colorstay), but for most things water works. Just make sure to clean the airbrush with whatever the base of the product you are using is... if it is waterbased use water,,, silicone based... use 244 fluid.

I am looking into getting the Temptu SB stuff, they have a "starter" set of 1/4 jars of all the colors for pretty cheap.

what is 244?

thanks lady..I too was considering the Temptu..its what Francesca Tolot uses I heard

Aug 07 06 01:14 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
David Klasfeld
Posts: 2,665
New York, New York, US


Hey Lottie-

In theory you can really use any foundation through an airbrush, but for best results, yes you want to use something formulated specifically for one, and here's why:

In order to pass through the gun without clogging, the foundation needs to be of a very thin consistency, and most 'regular' foundations are too thick or viscous, even the sheer ones, for this purpose. In order to get them through, they need to be cut or diluted with something (either water, alcohol, or 244 Fluid which is a Silicone Liquid). The problem with doing it this way is this: when you water down a product...you get a watered-down product! You get a foundation that is no longer performing the way it was designed to be used, as both the coverage and the longevity have been compromised.

Think about it this way: when was the last time watering down anything improved its quality?  No one would advise a painter to waterdown his Oil Paints or Acrylics to use through an airbrush, or tell a pastry chef to waterdown icing for theirs, so its sort of a diservice when a company tells you to thin down their makeup for use in a gun. And its usually the ones who don't make an airbrush specifc product who do.

When you use an airbrush specific foundation, this is obviously not the case: with very few exceptions, they all come ready to use straight out of the bottle. Also, remember that the airbrush is not magic: all it does is disperse a very concentrated foundation that's high in coverage very evenly, so that you need to use a minimum of product, even to acheive full coverage. The result should look like perfect skin with very little makeup. When you put a regular foundation in that's also been 'thinned' you'll of course need to use way more to acheive the same result, hence negating the very purpose of using an airbrush in the purpose.

I should disclose that I own a makeup company that among other things, makes airbrush foundation, but I promise you that's not the motivation I have in giving you this advice: I've been  doing makeup for 10+ years and airbrushing for 8 of them, and I learned this fact the hard way. Save yourself both the frustration and wasted product (and the clogging, and the constant touchups, and 'melting face syndrome!') and find yourself a great airbrush makeup!

Thanks!
DK
Aug 07 06 06:35 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
About Faces-Lynn
Posts: 957
Detroit, Michigan, US


Here is a recent thread that is about foundations for airbrushing.

http://www.modelmayhem.com/posts.php?thread_id=55859
Aug 07 06 07:10 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
About Faces-Lynn
Posts: 957
Detroit, Michigan, US


Lottie wrote:
ok..kill me..I can't figure out how to do a search within the forums and I am sure this has probably been asked before...

is it absolutely necessary to use airbrush makeup in an airbrush or is it a gimmick? I know this is a bad example, but I have seen shows like Project Runway where the makeup artists are using regular liquid foundation in their airbrushes...does this ruin the airbrush? Does it need to be diluted?

I am seriously looking into getting an airbrush after years of contemplating it and just have a few of these silly questions I need answered first.

Thanks in advance
**L**

If you go to the bottom of the page where all the forums are listed there is a search box to use for forum searches.

Aug 07 06 07:11 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


Lottie wrote:
what is 244?

thanks lady..I too was considering the Temptu..its what Francesca Tolot uses I heard

244 is an adhesive remover. 
It's used to thin out and remove silicone based adhesives (Telesis, Acetoxy, etc.) and to remove prosthetics applied with latex based adhesives (ProsAide, BetaBond, etc.)

Aug 07 06 10:32 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Cool Artist2005
Posts: 468
Dumont, New Jersey, US


It has to be a water based foundation....if it is not.....then you can say bye bye to your machine. That airbrush machine is expensive! Mine was over $500 and that included the gun, the compressor, and the foundations which are very thin in consitency...water based........but cover flawlessly.
I would not chance it.
Aug 07 06 08:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Rayrayrose
Posts: 3,510
Los Angeles, California, US


Airbsuh foundations do not have to be water based, you just have to clean your airbrush and take care of it.
Aug 07 06 09:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Cool Artist2005
Posts: 468
Dumont, New Jersey, US


rachelrose wrote:
Airbsuh foundations do not have to be water based, you just have to clean your airbrush and take care of it.

Oh so you are saying that my teacher was wrong about the machine. If there is oil or silcon on the foundations it will ruin the machine. By the way you spelled airbrush wrong

Aug 08 06 07:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Tracey Masterson
Posts: 553
Shelton, Connecticut, US


LOL Rachel!  Who taught YOU how to airbrush???

Yes, you can run silicone and oil based foundations through an airbrush.  What will ruin the GUN and not the MACHINE is cleaning with the wrong medium.
Aug 08 06 07:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
David Klasfeld
Posts: 2,665
New York, New York, US


Even as one of the manufacturers of water-based airbrush makeup, I can tell you that it is just fine to use other mediums (including Alcohol & Silicone) in your airbrush. One of the reasons some artists prefer waterbased foundations is because they clean out of the gun more easily than Silicone and Alcohol, as they require no special cleanser to do so (they usually clean out with regular tap water). But this doesn't mean that it's the only thing that works, and it certainly doesn't meam anything else will ruin your gun.

I happen to prefer waterbased foundations because the texture is more workable and adapts more easily to the type of finish you're going for (matte vs. shiny), but it is fun to experiment with alternative textures once and a while. Go ahead and try it, you might be surprised.

Good luck!
DK
Aug 08 06 07:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
April Landrum-Johns
Posts: 8
Atlanta, Georgia, US


I have talked to MUA's that thin out Revlon Colorstay and Loreal True Match foundation with thinner and like it.  I tried it and did not care for it. ( Maybe because I have not had my machine for long and was not using the right concentration amounts.  My husband got tired of me bitching about it and told me to order the freakin Airbrush make-up, so I did.  I heard from a friend NOT to use Dinair products (I have the Dinair compressor) so I went with Temptu SB and LOVE, LOVE, LOVE IT!  I got the $75 "sample" kit that has small tester size bottles of every "foundation" shade.   I still thin it out a little.....don't know if I'm supposed to or not, but I do.  It seems to work better.  LOL.....for beginners, be sure to use thinner (or 224) but not water, because it only made a mess for me with the traditional foundations.  Keep in mind I AM NO EXPERT ON AIRBRUSHING, I am just giving you MY example of what happend to me.  Any comments or advice?  I'll be happy to take it!
Aug 15 06 08:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Rayrayrose
Posts: 3,510
Los Angeles, California, US


Cool Artist2005 wrote:

Oh so you are saying that my teacher was wrong about the machine. If there is oil or silcon on the foundations it will ruin the machine. By the way you spelled airbrush wrong

Oh my god, I so just saw this. All I have to say is good riddance to this chick.

And seriously it's not spelled "airbsuh"? What a waste of my college education! You would think $80,000 later that I would be able to function on INTERNET MESSAGE BOARDS without typos.

God, but I think this question has already been answered. Clean it in the right medium and you are good to go.

Aug 15 06 10:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,847
San Francisco, California, US


Just for the record it is REALLY hard to break an airbrush "machine" unless you treat it to some serious physical trauma. WHat you can do is blunt your needle, split your tips, lock your chuck, get gunk in your air valve assembly, or generally just make it REALLY difficult to clean. With parts and patience almost any airbrush can be repaired.

What the others said about cleaning the right medium with the right cleaner is spot on. . .

And for the record...it REALLY bothers me when people are taught complete nonsense by someone who's only qualification is taking a class from someone else.
Aug 15 06 10:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,847
San Francisco, California, US


Just for the record it is REALLY hard to break an airbrush "machine" unless you treat it to some serious physical trauma. WHat you can do is blunt your needle, split your tips, lock your chuck, get gunk in your air valve assembly, or generally just make it REALLY difficult to clean. With parts and patience almost any airbrush can be repaired.

What the others said about cleaning the right medium with the right cleaner is spot on. . .

And for the record...it REALLY bothers me when people are taught complete nonsense by someone who's only qualification is taking a class from someone else.
Aug 15 06 10:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
EugeneConde MakeupArtsy
Posts: 119
Los Angeles, California, US


Lottie wrote:
ok..kill me..I can't figure out how to do a search within the forums and I am sure this has probably been asked before...

is it absolutely necessary to use airbrush makeup in an airbrush or is it a gimmick? I know this is a bad example, but I have seen shows like Project Runway where the makeup artists are using regular liquid foundation in their airbrushes...does this ruin the airbrush? Does it need to be diluted?

I am seriously looking into getting an airbrush after years of contemplating it and just have a few of these silly questions I need answered first.

Thanks in advance
**L**

Lottie
All  year round  ive been checking your work, i thought you use airbrush. because they all well done.

Aug 16 06 02:30 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
ChristyR
Posts: 182
Los Angeles, California, US


on speaking of airbrush, has anyone heard of an company called airbrushcity.com, I stumbled across on a ebay listing they posted. They have very reasonable prices, I wonder if it's the best bet, if they offer waranties on their products.

thanks,

christy
Aug 16 06 03:42 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Ty Shaw
Posts: 87
Brooklyn, New York, US


ChristyR wrote:
on speaking of airbrush, has anyone heard of an company called airbrushcity.com, I stumbled across on a ebay listing they posted. They have very reasonable prices, I wonder if it's the best bet, if they offer waranties on their products.

thanks,

christy

I have never heard of airbrush city, but when I first thought about buying my airbrush I also went to Ebay (looking for a deal..as always). I found the O2 Cosmetics system and found that cheaper is not always better (my mom always said so, but...). I eventually ended up getting the Temptu system with the S/B foundations and they work great for me. Temptu also makes a water based formula, see :http://www.temptu.com/theme.php?id=29 and check out the aqua airbrush makeup.
They are really nice and very helpful if you have questions and the kit comes with a really good DVD.
Hope this helps!

Aug 16 06 08:53 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Ty Shaw
Posts: 87
Brooklyn, New York, US


Ty Shaw wrote:

I have never heard of airbrush city, but when I first thought about buying my airbrush I also went to Ebay (looking for a deal..as always). I found the O2 Cosmetics system and found that cheaper is not always better (my mom always said so, but...). I eventually ended up getting the Temptu system with the S/B foundations and they work great for me. Temptu also makes a water based formula, see :http://www.temptu.com/theme.php?id=29 and check out the aqua airbrush makeup.
They are really nice and very helpful if you have questions and the kit comes with a really good DVD.
Hope this helps!

One more thing, I haven't used an airbrush in any of my pics yet, but I look forward to it!

Aug 16 06 08:55 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,847
San Francisco, California, US


ChristyR wrote:
on speaking of airbrush, has anyone heard of an company called airbrushcity.com, I stumbled across on a ebay listing they posted. They have very reasonable prices, I wonder if it's the best bet, if they offer waranties on their products.

thanks,

christy

It looks to me that they sell "Airbrush City" brand airbrushes. I've been offered the chance to sell "People Painters" or "Second Skin" airbrushes as well. There is a manufacturer in, I think, China that offers to make "your name here" brand airbrushes. Chances are that what you are looking at is a cheap knockoff. I have heard some people swear by the knockoffs that they have bought from other companies, and other people curse them. Me, I don't trust the quality or durability to be there.

Aug 16 06 09:36 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
MelodyW Hair N Makeup
Posts: 80
Los Angeles, California, US


Cool Artist2005 wrote:

Oh so you are saying that my teacher was wrong about the machine. If there is oil or silcon on the foundations it will ruin the machine. By the way you spelled airbrush wrong

diddn't she quit already? Go home. http://www.modelmayhem.com/posts.php?thread_id=67893

but back to the topic.... I find it pays in time to have the bottle of base you like, pre mixed and ready to go. Mixing myself I've made a mess and getting the right ratio between product and whatever you dilution is, it hard for me. I like my base factory mixed. BTW Lottie your work is soo pretty!

Aug 16 06 11:09 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Rayrayrose
Posts: 3,510
Los Angeles, California, US


melodyw wrote:
diddn't she quit already? Go home. http://www.modelmayhem.com/posts.php?thread_id=67893

Yeah she did, I was just giving out a final "good riddance".

Aug 16 06 11:14 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
ChristyR
Posts: 182
Los Angeles, California, US


Thanks, Rich. I will defintely wait and buy the Iwatas I've been wanting to buy. I will be chancing it for something that is an investment in my makeup kit.

She's addicted to mm.
Aug 16 06 01:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lou-femi
Posts: 46
Alliston, Ontario, Canada


Cool Artist2005 wrote:

Oh so you are saying that my teacher was wrong about the machine. If there is oil or silcon on the foundations it will ruin the machine. By the way you spelled airbrush wrong

Temptu makes a line of silicone based paints just for airbrushing. As well any tattoo paint will be alcohol based so water is not your only option. Water won't evaporate as quickly and its thinner so its easier to clean but as long as you clean it out all is good. I have been running my Iwata HCS eclipes with these paints and have never had a problem.

Aug 18 06 08:55 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


I have found that "water based" airbrush foundations work quite well in photography where the artist can be on top of the model and repair and retouch when needed.

It does not, however, hold up to a long shoot day on a film or video set.  I have had some serious problems with "name" brand water based airbrush formulas in these situations.

For my peace of mind and a more consistent finish, I stick to silicone and alcohol based airbrush foundations for production work.  They might be harder to clean up, but the results are much more reliable.
Aug 18 06 09:22 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
David Klasfeld
Posts: 2,665
New York, New York, US


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:
I have found that "water based" airbrush foundations work quite well in photography where the artist can be on top of the model and repair and retouch when needed. It does not, however, hold up to a long shoot day on a film or video set.

Prior to introducing OCC Skin, I shared many of the same concerns Kevin does with existing water-based airbrush formulas.  However, as the majority of my work is usually filmed in Hi-Definition, I had to err on the side of products that dried to a more matte finish: any kind of shine, unless very strategically applied and maintained, will drive the Hi-Def techs crazy, who will in turn do the same to you! As these days are usually at least 12 hours long, durability is a concern. The last thing you want to do is annoy everyone on set with frequent touchups throughout the day, or be locked into powdering excessively if you do use a more moist-looking base. This more than anything is what inspired me to create a superior water-based product.

I'd like to think that I achieved exactly what I set out to create: a foundation with a natural matte finish, that's lightweight, gentle on the skin, and lasts at least 12+ hours. The formula is also truly 100% oil-free, (and not "Cosmetics Industry Permissible" Oil Free, which means it’s only free of Mineral Oil and Lanolin) which is not only better for skin, its rinses out of the gun much easier too.   

Kevin, if you're ever interested in trying it, you know where to find me! smile

Thanks!
DK

Aug 18 06 11:45 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Kevin-James Bennett
Posts: 782


David Klasfeld wrote:
Kevin, if you're ever interested in trying it, you know where to find me! smile

Thanks!
DK

Hey D,

Let's just agree to disagree.  You have a product to sell and I have a personal opinion on airbrush formulations.  Everyone has a different style and technique.  It actually gives everyone more choices when they read opposing views.

BTW - Any foundation can be made matte for HDV with the correct powder. In my experience, you have to be very careful with matte finishes in this format.  Sometimes it makes the product more noticeable.

And I have tried OCC Skin and Ink.  Marianne Skiba collected quite a few different brands of airbrush foundation when she was doing her HDV seminars at IMATS and has brought them all to "Law & Order" so we could test them.

Even though we don't always agree I still luv ya and wish you all the success in the world! http://kjbennett.com/blowingkisses.gif

KJ

Aug 18 06 12:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
David Klasfeld
Posts: 2,665
New York, New York, US


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:
Let's just agree to disagree.  You have a product to sell and I have a personal opinion on airbrush formulations.  Everyone has a different style and technique.  It actually gives everyone more choices when they read opposing views.

Kevin, I couldn't agree more: the most valuable thing for an artist is to experience different techniques and products, and not to be "sold to" by just one brand. That's why to this point, the only workshops I've taught using my product also include a number of other brands as well. I'm always pleased to hear and provide alternative opinions in my classes: after all, there's no one prescribed correct method, and that's what makes what we do art, not science.

For the record though, I also have a personal opinion on airbrush formulations which predates having a company: it was my opinions that influenced which products I sell, and not which products I sell that influence my opinions. Similarly, I'm sure you don't recommend the products you've mentioned here based solely on the fact that you've worked for those companies.

Please send my best to Marianne. I'm pleased to count her and Gina among our supporters, and I'm even more pleased that artists of your caliber have had a chance to work with our products.

Thanks Again,
DK

Aug 18 06 12:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lottie
Posts: 953


makeupartsy wrote:

Lottie
All  year round  ive been checking your work, i thought you use airbrush. because they all well done.

Thanks Eugene smile

Aug 19 06 12:08 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
BeautyByIsis
Posts: 583
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Cool Artist2005 wrote:

Oh so you are saying that my teacher was wrong about the machine. If there is oil or silcon on the foundations it will ruin the machine. By the way you spelled airbrush wrong

lol....

Aug 19 06 12:29 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
BeautyByIsis
Posts: 583
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


I use temptu sb and it works like an absolute dream smile  Worth the cost...

Although it may be possible to thin out regular foundation, I feel that it's best to use the formulas specified for airbrush use.  I've never had a problem with temptu.
Aug 19 06 12:32 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
makeupguy dot com
Posts: 436
VALLEY VILLAGE, California, US


244 is sometimes used as an adhesive remover.. but it's actually a silicone oil.  it's used as a carrier in many silicone based cosmetics.. it's a great Pros-Aide Transfer Remover.  '

However.. on another note.. ProsAide and BetaBond are NOT Latex based!! They are Acrylic Based.. not the same thing at ALL!

Also.. you cannot thin silicone adhesives with 244 fluid.  That would be like thinning a glue with it's own remover.  It's an OIL.. not a thinner.


Kevin-James Bennett wrote:

244 is an adhesive remover. 
It's used to thin out and remove silicone based adhesives (Telesis, Acetoxy, etc.) and to remove prosthetics applied with latex based adhesives (ProsAide, BetaBond, etc.)

May 31 08 05:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
vanessa perez
Posts: 1,253
Los Angeles, California, US


this might be a dumb question, since we are on the topic of air (bursh) ;P
once you have applied the foundation, is there anything else you do, like in type of blending or what not? Sorry never done air brush before, looking to go to a seminar to learn more about it.

vanessa perez
May 31 08 07:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
David Klasfeld
Posts: 2,665
New York, New York, US


vanessa perez wrote:
this might be a dumb question, since we are on the topic of air (bursh) ;P
once you have applied the foundation, is there anything else you do, like in type of blending or what not? Sorry never done air brush before, looking to go to a seminar to learn more about it.

vanessa perez

Your goal is to leave the foundation as "untouched" as possible. Lots of brands market the moveability of their airbrushed foundation, which provides the user with a false sense of security - if you blend it after the application, then you've just sprayed makeup through a fancy (and expensive!) tool with no real benefit.

The true benefit of airbrush is two-fold:
-Sheer, opaque coverage: Sounds like a contradiction in terms, right? It used to be, but not anymore. You're getting a high-intensity pigment distributed as sheerly and evenly as possible, so you get flawless coverage and a minimum of product.

-The dot pattern it puts down is closer to the way the camera reads skin than say, the swipe of a sponge or brush. Every tool puts down a pattern, and in the age of digital photography and Hi-Def TV, a pattern more similar to pixels is your friend.

Does this all make sense? I go into it in a lot more detail on the Airbrush Makeup FAQ on our website.

Hope this helps,
DK

PS: As an aside, it is beyond interesting to read this now two year old thread. It's amazing how much things change.

May 31 08 09:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
vanessa perez
Posts: 1,253
Los Angeles, California, US


David Klasfeld wrote:
Your goal is to leave the foundation as "untouched" as possible. Lots of brands market the moveability of their airbrushed foundation, which provides the user with a false send of security - if you blend it after the application, then you've just sprayed makeup through a fancy (and expensive!) tool with no real benefit.

The true benefit of airbrush is two-fold:
-Sheer, opaque coverage: Sounds like a contradiction in terms, right? It used to be, but not anymore. You're getting a high-intensity pigment distributed as sheerly and evenly as possible, so you get flawless coverage and a minimum of product.

-The dot pattern it puts down is closer to the way the camera reads skin than say, the swipe of a sponge or brush. Every tool puts down a pattern, and in the age of digital photography and Hi-Def TV, a pattern more similar to pixels is your friend.

Does this all make sense? I go into it in a lot more detail on the Airbrush Makeup FAQ on our website.

Hope this helps,
DK

PS: As an aside, it is beyond interesting to read this now two year old thread. It's amazing how much things change.

makes perfect sense, thanks David! I will go take a look right now.

May 31 08 10:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Neelam Saini
Posts: 15
Brampton, Ontario, Canada


David Klasfeld wrote:

Prior to introducing OCC Skin, I shared many of the same concerns Kevin does with existing water-based airbrush formulas.  However, as the majority of my work is usually filmed in Hi-Definition, I had to err on the side of products that dried to a more matte finish: any kind of shine, unless very strategically applied and maintained, will drive the Hi-Def techs crazy, who will in turn do the same to you! As these days are usually at least 12 hours long, durability is a concern. The last thing you want to do is annoy everyone on set with frequent touchups throughout the day, or be locked into powdering excessively if you do use a more moist-looking base. This more than anything is what inspired me to create a superior water-based product.

I'd like to think that I achieved exactly what I set out to create: a foundation with a natural matte finish, that's lightweight, gentle on the skin, and lasts at least 12+ hours. The formula is also truly 100% oil-free, (and not "Cosmetics Industry Permissible" Oil Free, which means it’s only free of Mineral Oil and Lanolin) which is not only better for skin, its rinses out of the gun much easier too.   

Kevin, if you're ever interested in trying it, you know where to find me! smile

Thanks!
DK

Totally sold!! yikes

Jan 26 12 08:41 am  Link  Quote 
Hair Stylist
Calista Hair and MUA
Posts: 143
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


vanessa perez wrote:
this might be a dumb question, since we are on the topic of air (bursh) ;P
once you have applied the foundation, is there anything else you do, like in type of blending or what not? Sorry never done air brush before, looking to go to a seminar to learn more about it.

vanessa perez

The whole idea of A/B is that the compressor does the work 'for you'. You want to keep the dot pattern it creates as intact as possible. However, if you get an area that's blotchy/uneven, you can certainly blend it out but, don't allow the A/B foundation set before you fix it, bc then it won't budge. I prefer to use my (very clean) fingers to touch-up. However, a duo-fiber brush or beauty blender would work also. HTH!

Jan 26 12 12:03 pm  Link  Quote 
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