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first123
Model
Justene
Posts: 4
Dewey, Arizona, US


Wow, I really didn't expect this much of a response, but thanks for taking your time to share what you believe. Honestly, I can handle the negative criticism regarding no http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/88-90_Ford_Escort_Wagon.jpg/120px-88-90_Ford_Escort_Wagon.jpg/bodyguard policies on set from the photographers, it's your say if you have authority on the shoot and you decide who you work with - I usually do inquire as to policy before showing up with someone else unannounced; your opinions towards my knowledge or experience as a model, my experience fortunately has been with those I knew personally beyond seeing here or there to not need my own security and outdoor sessions were shot at particular times to avoid security concerns; and even if you thought this was a wasted post, because if so, why waste you're valuable time replying, but in retrospect I should have been clearer on my question.

So here's what I was hoping to hear about from feedback, as I'm planning shoots as a Project Manager and carrying the liability insurance, I have to take into consideration other factors like being in regions out of my state of current residency or past residencies, shoots out of the country, the equipment on the set for the photographer, wardrobe, props, high-traffic areas and passer-by's, etc...

Last, as far as my opinion is concerned on the matter, yes always let more than one person know where you are and what time's your arriving and leaving, what you're driving, and what you're wearing there and home, check references beyond the model/photographer - if you can reach or ascertain info about the company in charge of the shoot if you haven't worked with them before, and if no major issues with authority figures and security does not interfere with the shoot or photographer's creative mind, I just rather be safe than sorry. I appreciate when in certain out of studio shoots, the management team hires the security to handle these issues I addressed, so I don't have to have to bring up, not that I do when working with certain colleagues. Not trying to start some kind of pissing match, so if you happen to see this post, reply only if your the one in charge of the shoot, thank you.
May 07 12 12:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Marcus Studios
Posts: 8,353
Los Angeles, California, US


As a project manager, you will have many good reasons to have an assistant.

As the producer of the majority of my assignments over the years, I have had many assistants.

Some of my best location assistants have been men that had a military background. I can highly recommend using vets for several reasons. They can be good bodyguards as well as skilled and competent workers.

I had one such assistant while on assignment in Texas who saved my life by interceding between me and a man with a knife that was rushing up behind me. By the time I realized what was happening, the man was on the ground and my assistant had hold of the knife.

Be aware that liability insurance may or may not be valid in a different state from where you purchased it. Ask your agent about this and make sure you are properly covered.

Traveling to another country to work opens up a whole other can of worms. Work Permits are required by most countries and need to be arranged sometimes months in advance. Many countries (like Canada) might allow you to come in to work, but not to bring your equipment. Make sure you check things out before blindly getting on a plane with all your stuff.

KM
May 10 12 07:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DougBPhoto
Posts: 37,041
Portland, Oregon, US


Ken Marcus Studios wrote:
Don't you all just love threads like this, where the OP starts off with some outlandish premise and then never bothers to return to the thread to appreciate or take note of the comments that people take their time to write . . . .

It makes one wonder how many thousands of profiles are created for the sole purpose of trolling or other insincere forms of activity on the site.

May 10 12 07:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,471
Houston, Texas, US


Smith and Wesson offers "Bodyguards" in two styles:

http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/sw_bodyguard_38_02.jpg

http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson2/upload/images/firearms/detail_md/109380_01_md.jpg
May 10 12 07:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wolfstar Studio
Posts: 861
Cross Roads, Texas, US


Welcome! Here's the Basic Noob Survival Guide . . .

First, watch this: http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/2062671/nude-model
and then this (don't be this girl): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CTJBIJl59Y

TO BE SUCCESSFUL, BUSY AND SAFE (models and photographers both);
Read it, learn it, love it, LIVE IT:


THIS: http://racheljay.wordpress.com/2009/12/ … -thoughts/
THIS: http://racheljay.wordpress.com/2009/12/07/escorts-pro/
THIS: http://racheljay.wordpress.com/2009/12/08/escorts-anti/
This: http://www.modelinsider.com/content/articles/safety
This: http://www.modelinsider.com/content/art … ediligence

And please don't start another thread on escorts. It will end badly for you. It always does. It's

been done to death again and again and again. It may actually be the reason this site has mayhem

in the name. ;-)

In previous MM forums, the vast majority of models that insist on escorts tend to be:

1. Very young (18-24, generally)
2. Lack agency potential/stats (generally petite)
3. Little or No experience (usually less than 1 year). It has been found that the need for an

escort is inversely proportional to the quality of the model. In short, if you suck, you want an

escort. If you're worth shooting, you don't.
4. Have an unrealistically fearful perspective about model safety, caused by a Mean World Syndrome

perspective perpetrated by the media, second and third-hand "stories", and urban legend.
5. Have a "look" that's easily found among the vast majority of models that can replace her that

do not need an escort to do their jobs.

Just please don't do it. Ever.


TO LEARN THE SITE, READ:

This: http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=18926
This: http://www.ripoffreport.com
This: http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=117121

TO NETWORK, READ:

Here: http://www.modelmayhem.com/casting/search_casting
Here: http://www.modelmayhem.com/browse
Here: http://www.modelmayhem.com/announce
and here: http://www.modelmayhem.com/f.php

Site to know:

http://www.modelinsider.com
http://www.newmodels.com/

Good luck and welcome to chaos incarnate.
May 10 12 08:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Image K
Posts: 23,343
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


John Allan wrote:

So, you're worried about keeping your eye on a minimal value of stuff while you're preoccupied with the process of shooting. Imagine how the photographer feels keeping an eye on your security person, to insure that his/her 'probably 10-50 times the value' stuff doesn't walk off with your 'security'.

+1

May 11 12 12:46 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Justene
Posts: 4
Dewey, Arizona, US


Thank you Ken, this was the response I was looking for.! So glad to hear your bodyguard stopped you from being the victim of an attack. I appreciate the info on the liability insurance, state requirements will vary and make sure to read the policy through and through. Also thanks for the bodyguard hand gun information, that's my next step in Krav to take on gun safety and training.


Ken Marcus Studios wrote:
As a project manager, you will have many good reasons to have an assistant.

As the producer of the majority of my assignments over the years, I have had many assistants.

Some of my best location assistants have been men that had a military background. I can highly recommend using vets for several reasons. They can be good bodyguards as well as skilled and competent workers.

I had one such assistant while on assignment in Texas who saved my life by interceding between me and a man with a knife that was rushing up behind me. By the time I realized what was happening, the man was on the ground and my assistant had hold of the knife.

Be aware that liability insurance may or may not be valid in a different state from where you purchased it. Ask your agent about this and make sure you are properly covered.

Traveling to another country to work opens up a whole other can of worms. Work Permits are required by most countries and need to be arranged sometimes months in advance. Many countries (like Canada) might allow you to come in to work, but not to bring your equipment. Make sure you check things out before blindly getting on a plane with all your stuff.

KM

May 11 12 06:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yani S
Posts: 829
Los Angeles, California, US


Ken Marcus Studios wrote:
As a project manager, you will have many good reasons to have an assistant.

As the producer of the majority of my assignments over the years, I have had many assistants.

Some of my best location assistants have been men that had a military background. I can highly recommend using vets for several reasons. They can be good bodyguards as well as skilled and competent workers.

I had one such assistant while on assignment in Texas who saved my life by interceding between me and a man with a knife that was rushing up behind me. By the time I realized what was happening, the man was on the ground and my assistant had hold of the knife.

Be aware that liability insurance may or may not be valid in a different state from where you purchased it. Ask your agent about this and make sure you are properly covered.

Traveling to another country to work opens up a whole other can of worms. Work Permits are required by most countries and need to be arranged sometimes months in advance. Many countries (like Canada) might allow you to come in to work, but not to bring your equipment. Make sure you check things out before blindly getting on a plane with all your stuff.

KM

All I can say is "WoW" glad your ok!!!

May 11 12 09:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wolfstar Studio
Posts: 861
Cross Roads, Texas, US


Justene wrote:
Thank you Ken, this was the response I was looking for.! So glad to hear your bodyguard stopped you from being the victim of an attack.

It wasn't his bodyguard, it was his assistant, who's a veteran. We have a tendency to react rather well to situations like that, especially when you have combat experience. This is why many of us go into private security and get jobs as bodyguards and cops.

May 11 12 09:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wolfstar Studio
Posts: 861
Cross Roads, Texas, US


rp_photo wrote:
Smith and Wesson offers "Bodyguards" in two styles:

http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/sw_bodyguard_38_02.jpg

http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson2/upload/images/firearms/detail_md/109380_01_md.jpg

and the more stylish

http://www.rc-trucks.org/Smith-and-Wesson-Sigma-SW40VE-Pistol-Review.jpg

May 11 12 09:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,830
Delphos, Ohio, US


Justene wrote:
So here's what I was hoping to hear about from feedback, as I'm planning shoots as a Project Manager and carrying the liability insurance, I have to take into consideration other factors like being in regions out of my state of current residency or past residencies, shoots out of the country, the equipment on the set for the photographer, wardrobe, props, high-traffic areas and passer-by's, etc

Has MM policy on "management" changed? tongue

What you're talking about seems to go far and beyond http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/88-90_Ford_Escort_Wagon.jpg/120px-88-90_Ford_Escort_Wagon.jpg issues. Having "bodyguards" or "security" opens up a completely different can of worms with regard to insuring shoots and events. Are you going to bond your security personnel? How are you going to screen them? Are you going to privatize your security personnel? Who is going to front the costs?

Quite frankly, why should I trust YOUR judgement when hiring "security" for a shoot?

Also, depending on your locality, your "security" people may (or likely may not) have absolutely ZERO authority to do squat should a situation arise. Okay, they can call the real cops with their cell phones but, under the circumstances, they would have no authority whatsoever. You just invite hostility. If one of your security people fucks up, YOU will be held equally liable.

May 11 12 09:44 pm  Link  Quote 
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