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Photographer
Extrosy
Posts: 656
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


How do models feel about shooting in a House / Townhouse vs a dedicated studio?

I can clear a 20x10 foot shooting space with high ceilings. 

Aside from having to deal with carpet, what are the general feelings about shooting at someone's home?
Sep 19 12 09:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Innovative Imagery
Posts: 2,815
Los Angeles, California, US


Conduct yourself as a pro.  Shoot great images and it will never (hardly never) be a problem.
Sep 19 12 09:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Extrosy
Posts: 656
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


Innovative Imagery wrote:
Conduct yourself as a pro.  Shoot great images and it will never (hardly never) be a problem.

Assuming my conduct is not in question, I was just curious if there is a general opinion about shooting at a home.

Sep 19 12 09:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sylph Sia
Posts: 34
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Extrosy wrote:

Assuming my conduct is not in question, I was just curious if there is a general opinion about shooting at a home.

The majority of the photographers I've worked with have a studio in their home actually now I come to think about it, and it's never been and issue or even something that I've thought twice about as long as they're professional. I think it's pretty common for photographers to have studios in their houses.

Sep 19 12 09:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Innovative Imagery
Posts: 2,815
Los Angeles, California, US


Extrosy wrote:

Assuming my conduct is not in question, I was just curious if there is a general opinion about shooting at a home.

Your reputation will proceed you and calm any fears of a home studio.  If your work looks crappy ( and I am not saying it does) then they will be hesitant.  If rumors abound, the same.

Otherwise, no big deal.

Sep 19 12 10:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Extrosy
Posts: 656
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


Good to hear.
Sep 19 12 10:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,323
Orlando, Florida, US


Extrosy wrote:

Assuming my conduct is not in question, I was just curious if there is a general opinion about shooting at a home.

Not from professional (acting) people.  All they care about is the results you can produce.

Sep 19 12 10:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Van Dyke
Posts: 1,501
Washington, District of Columbia, US


food for thought...   yes choice of venue matters... especially to the client and/or their art director... who will what to know if you have professional liability insurance and if you have pulled a permit for location shoots...

that said, if you are a hobbyist sans a client then only professional liability insurance is of merit...

and may the odds be ever in your favor...
Sep 20 12 07:00 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 21,141
New York, New York, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:

Not from professional (acting) people.  All they care about is the results you can produce.

One of the best and most sought after headshot photographers in LA shot from his garage...

Sep 20 12 07:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Matt Schmidt
Posts: 3,680
Greensboro, North Carolina, US


I shoot almost everything on this site . . . from my home studio.

The biggest question I get asked is, "When do you want me to show up?"
Sep 20 12 07:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leo Howard
Posts: 6,760
Phoenix, Arizona, US


I currently have a commercial location, but I have also used my garage, livingroom, kitchen, and lots of location shoots, and I still do a lot of location shoots, it has never really been a problem either way. I say, if  they don't want to shoot with me wherever I may be shooting, then they don't want to shoot with me.

Spending $1000+ per month to have a commercial location just to shoot TF* is throwing good money after bad, now, if your intention is to try to get paid clients and also use the studio for TF* then great, but I wouldn't rent a place just for TF* shoots.

As far as clients go, I've never had one complain or stop working with me because I worked from home, in fact, some have commented how convenient it must be to work from home.

My biggest issue with shooting from home was people disrupting the rest of the family, someone comes to the door, the dog starts barking and thinks that the new person in the house is there just to play with her. I think if I had a studio at home with a separate entrance and its own bathroom, it would be better, I have sometimes felt like people were invading my personal space, you may not have this issue if you are single and live alone.

Personally, if I could have another studio at home with a separate entrance and its own bathroom, I would ditch the commercial studio again.

Leo
www.leohoward.com
Sep 20 12 07:23 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Nylon
Posts: 414
Singapore, Singapore, Singapore


I'm fine with either having shot in all kinds of location, so long as the results are good smile
Sep 20 12 07:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Shifting Paradigm Photo
Posts: 25
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


I set up a studio five years ago in my basement and only used it twice. I found, and continue to find, the natural light and the atmosphere of the actual rooms make the studio unnecessary. Also, it's a matter of attitude. You can have an amazing studio with all sorts of professional atmosphere, but if you're not a good photographer, you really don't have anything. Good work can be created anywhere by a good and creative photographer and open minded model. Don't focus on the WHERE of the shoot, rather than on the skill of the participants.
Sep 20 12 08:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Extrosy wrote:
Assuming my conduct is not in question, I was just curious if there is a general opinion about shooting at a home.

Real models don't care where you shoot as long as results are good.

Wannabe internet divas, on the other hand, may balk. That's a great clue for you to say, "NEXT!"




Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano
www.stefanobrunesci.com

Sep 20 12 08:04 am  Link  Quote 
Model
JessieLeigh
Posts: 2,014
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


I have done a few shoots in the photographer's home studio, and even allowed a photographer to bring lighting and backdrops into my own home for a shoot.

Some things to consider:

- Be upfront. I had a photographer send me an address to a studio in a prt of town I wasn't familiar with. They didn't tell me it was their home. I didn't care, but it would have been nice to know up front, because she lived in a gated community and mapquest was telling me to turn where there was wall! She also failed to give me the gate code (which would have made it clear it was a home studio)

- Family can be an issue. Same shoot as above, the photographer had her husband and children at home... Again, this is fine IF they are respectful of what is going on. The husband was. The children were too young to understand that mommy was technically working, and interupted the shoot multiple times

- Pets!! Some models may have allergies to cats or dogs. If you have one you should warn models in advance.
Sep 20 12 10:05 am  Link  Quote 
Model
NicoleNudes
Posts: 3,844
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I don't care as long as you conduct yourself as a professional. I've shot with tons of people in their home studios. Not everyone can afford to rent a studio.
Sep 20 12 10:07 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Dekilah
Posts: 4,883
Detroit, Michigan, US


I like home studios. And I am pretty tolerant of pets, other people, whatever. I do like to be aware if there will be other people around and I agree with the previous response suggesting you let models know if you have pets. Personally, I am even more likely to shoot with someone who has pets ^_~ And yes, I do like to know what type of building I am looking for when you give me the address. Is it a studio? A home? An apartment? Mainly that just helps me find the place.

Beyond that, all I really need is a bathroom and a place to put my stuff. And I happen to be perfect for smaller home studios because I am tiny ^_^
Sep 20 12 11:23 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Isis22
Posts: 2,499
Muncie, Indiana, US


I have a preference for natural light and cool locations. I have no preference between a home studio and an actual studio. It's your talent that matters.
Sep 20 12 12:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Neil Snape
Posts: 9,456
Paris, Île-de-France, France


I shoot at home. It is sometimes a hassle for many reasons. Does it stop MM people from working with me? No not at all.

I'd say your biggest problem is going to be carpet. I suppose a few sheets of plywood or plexi will do it.
Sep 20 12 12:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Paige Morgan
Posts: 4,058
New York, New York, US


I've shot in homes, studios, apartments, basements and lots of other locations. All I need to know is what I'm looking for to find the place.


Getting the shot is all that matters, and where it was taken is not an issue.
Sep 20 12 12:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
The Alternative Image
Posts: 4,129
London, England, United Kingdom


I have shot a few at home, but because of space they will be 2/3 shots, shooting in the garage this weekend.
Sep 20 12 12:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
IDiivil
Posts: 4,018
Los Angeles, California, US


I am just as happy to shoot in a home as I am to shoot in a studio. Doesn't really matter the location smile
Sep 20 12 12:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelleth
Posts: 2,516
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


It makes no difference to me.
Sep 20 12 01:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Extrosy
Posts: 656
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


This is all good to hear.

Yes, the carpet is my biggest challenge.
Sep 20 12 01:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sarah Robinson-Bird
Posts: 539
Sheffield, England, United Kingdom


treat your home like you would a studio i.e. keep it clean and tidy and I wont mind

is it possible to get some kind of fabric backdrop on a curtain pole set up ( maybe on tripods for temporary set ups) and use that to cover the carpet? or a white sheet tacked to cover both the carpet and skirting board

ALWAYS cover the skirting boards! one, they're ugly. two, they give away the orientation of your composition, potentially ruining a crop
Sep 20 12 01:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Paolo Diavolo
Posts: 8,367
Martinez, California, US


my home is all beautiful hardwood floors. score!
if its not obviously outside all the images in my port were shot in my house.

-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:
Real models don't care where you shoot as long as results are good.

Wannabe internet divas, on the other hand, may balk. That's a great clue for you to say, "NEXT!"

this.

Sep 20 12 02:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Miss_Bee
Posts: 147
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


As long as it's tidy and the person acts professionally, there's not too much of a difference between shooting in a photographer's home or studio (besides that sometimes you can smoke inside!)
Sep 25 12 09:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Abbitt Photography
Posts: 11,446
Oakland Acres, Iowa, US


I think it's hard to get an accurate answer on that.

I had one model who "vanished" prior to our home studio shoot.  She contacted me later with another casting, which she did not realize was me again, and ended up telling me that it was using a home studio that scared her off.

I rarely have a model tell me that, but it made me think:  How many cancelation are due to that?   It's hard to say.  I think most of the models who feel intimidated by home studio shoots are unlikely to voice the fact that's their reason, so I think it will be hard to get an accurate measure on that one.
Sep 26 12 06:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DAVfoto
Posts: 2,324
New York, New York, US


I'm between studios, had one in brooklyn, now shoot in my living room in Long Island City, negotiating a space in chelsea to share with a couple of other people.  I haven't had a problem, but if you get hired by a client, budget for a studio space anyways
Sep 26 12 10:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Farenell Photography
Posts: 17,956
Albany, New York, US


Extrosy wrote:
Assuming my conduct is not in question, I was just curious if there is a general opinion about shooting at a home.

Shooting at home can save you a sh** ton on overhead fees.

Sep 26 12 11:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
BlueMoonPics
Posts: 4,236
New York, New York, US


Abbitt Photography wrote:
I think it's hard to get an accurate answer on that.

I had one model who "vanished" prior to our home studio shoot.  She contacted me later with another casting, which she did not realize was me again, and ended up telling me that it was using a home studio that scared her off.

I rarely have a model tell me that, but it made me think:  How many cancelation are due to that?   It's hard to say.  I think most of the models who feel intimidated by home studio shoots are unlikely to voice the fact that's their reason, so I think it will be hard to get an accurate measure on that one.

I had some incidents recently about this subject.

I had a couple of models balk from shooting at my home studio.  I've worked with them, even driven them around in my car, on a few occasions before, so we knew each other. This happened even after I'd told them if they are not comfortable that I will rent a studio instead.

One of them told me she was fine with it but came up with several postponements and finally the shoot and probably any future shoots will never happen.  This was for a stock shoot for which I was paying her.  Some models want to bring their friends along to sit and watch.  I personally don't want strangers in my home.  They can bring an assistant to help out if they like, but I would like to meet them first.

I don't think some models will tell you, and they may even lie, that they are not comfortable about going to a photographers home.

I have wood floors and a completely empty 15'x18' living room, devoid of furniture, dedicated to doing shoots.  And yes, it would save me a ton of cash and work from lugging all my lights and props around.  If only I could get the models to come over and shoot with me. hmm

Sep 26 12 12:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Gina Dee
Posts: 314
BRONX, New York, US


I'm a newbie with a port/profile less than a month old. Because of my admitted lack of experience and overly cautious outlook I would be hesitant to do, in particular, a first shoot at a home studio. I'm a New Yorker and I haven't learned to trust people like that yet.

Of course a killer port and a few references would easily do away with most apprehensions. But a more seasoned model would no doubt be a better reference point than me but that's just my 2 cents.

I'm still taking baby steps.
Sep 26 12 12:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Eli Anthony
Posts: 545
Mentor, Ohio, US


I shoot from home 90% of the time, not an issue as I tell everyone upfront and I have it listed on my profile and website. Everyplace I have lived I have one room dedicated for my setup and sometimes end up shooting all over the place. If they have an issue with it, I offer another location or tell them most of my equipment can travel if they have a place in mind. My setup is simple, I have 9 rolls of seamless, backdrop stands, 8ft x 4ft 3/4" MDF to serve as the floor. Professional behavior and results is the key!
Nov 29 12 07:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


The politically correct thing to say is that only the final outcome matters and indeed it should. It's nice to see some of the more talented and experienced models not having an issue with it.

With that said, I still often see a NEW models bio that includes wording to the effect that "I'm open to all shoots but I expect a professional location. That means a real studio not your basement."

But I'm certainly not going to add a $800-$1000 monthly expense just for the perception of the few who take exception...model or commercial client.
Nov 29 12 07:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


BlueMoonPics wrote:
Some models want to bring their friends along to sit and watch.  I personally don't want strangers in my home.  They can bring an assistant to help out if they like, but I would like to meet them first.

I think this is also a great point. Even today, when a photographer says "home studio" the perception is a casual-ness so a model might feel less inclined to take it seriously.

The other point is that there are many many variations of a home studio. A commercial studio is pretty standard or at least has a level of expectation on what you'll find. Few unknowns.

A home studio can be anything from an entire dedicated wing or addition in a large house with separate entrance...to someone's spare bedroom where you have to walk past the pets and the breakfast dishes to enter.

A separate entrance makes a huge difference.

Nov 29 12 07:54 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Crystal Santoro
Posts: 1
Wilmington, North Carolina, US


Personally, I get a little edgy if its my first shoot with a photographer but so long as I have an escort I don't think it would be too big of a problem. Now, if you object to escorts and its our first shoot, I probably would avoid the situation. I sugest having coffee with your model first so it puts them at ease a little.
Nov 29 12 08:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Abbitt Photography
Posts: 11,446
Oakland Acres, Iowa, US


DP-
Nov 29 12 08:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJ_In_Atlanta
Posts: 12,686
Atlanta, Georgia, US


BlueMoonPics wrote:
I had some incidents recently about this subject.

I had a couple of models balk from shooting at my home studio.  I've worked with them, even driven them around in my car, on a few occasions before, so we knew each other. This happened even after I'd told them if they are not comfortable that I will rent a studio instead.

One of them told me she was fine with it but came up with several postponements and finally the shoot and probably any future shoots will never happen.  This was for a stock shoot for which I was paying her.  Some models want to bring their friends along to sit and watch.  I personally don't want strangers in my home.  They can bring an assistant to help out if they like, but I would like to meet them first.

I don't think some models will tell you, and they may even lie, that they are not comfortable about going to a photographers home.

I have wood floors and a completely empty 15'x18' living room, devoid of furniture, dedicated to doing shoots.  And yes, it would save me a ton of cash and work from lugging all my lights and props around.  If only I could get the models to come over and shoot with me. hmm

How odd, I don't know a lot of photographer who live in the city who would spend $ for a simple test.  Sure with a client shoot but not tests or stock, that is just way too expensive...

Nov 29 12 08:19 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
sospix
Posts: 21,270
Orlando, Florida, US


I live in a refrigerator box  .  .  .  but I keep it nice and neat, so it hasn't been an issue  .  .  .  wink  Location shouldn't matter, especially if the main subject of the image isn't the locale, I've shot in my house, the model's house, a vacant house, my dawg's porch (if she's in a good mood), as well as fully equipped studios, backstage at fashion shows, at designers work spaces  .  .  .  really depends on what you're after, but any 6' x 6' space should work  .  .  .

SOS
Nov 29 12 08:22 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Amul La La
Posts: 805
Plymouth, England, United Kingdom


Whatever works, works.
Nov 29 12 09:41 am  Link  Quote 
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