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first12
Photographer
Top Level Studio
Posts: 3,232
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada


Here in Victoria, the market is not large, so most portrait and wedding pros have studios in their homes.  There are few storefront type commercial studios.

Conversely, some hobbyists here rent studio space.

For me, I have the benefit of a home that has several usable shooting areas, and no models have ever been hesitant to work here.  However, since it is my home, I don't usually allow escorts.  One stranger in front of my camera is fine, but I don't want another stranger wandering around behind me.

As for carpet, what's the problem?  It's warmer and softer for the models to sit or lie on.  Every picture in my port that has a backdrop was shot on carpet.
Nov 29 12 01:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Echo_
Posts: 282
Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany


It doesn't matter to me but I would like more photographers being up front about this. They usually don't mention it and just give an address. The thing is inoften think i got lost when I end up in a residential area :p
Nov 29 12 01:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Jojo West
Posts: 972
Silver Spring, Maryland, US


Extrosy wrote:
How do models feel about shooting in a House / Townhouse vs a dedicated studio?

I can clear a 20x10 foot shooting space with high ceilings. 

Aside from having to deal with carpet, what are the general feelings about shooting at someone's home?

I'm 5'9 and I've had to shoot in someone's basement in heels, a lot of the shots from those shoots make me look stumpy because the photographer didn't have enough room and the angles weren't the best. Personally I prefer a studio, BUT if the house is nice and the ceilings are high, I don't see why not.

Nov 29 12 01:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Glenn Hall - Fine Art
Posts: 431
Townsville, Queensland, Australia


Yup, I have a home studio. Rents in my small town are insane, as properties take advantage of the mining boom in my area. Rental overheads passed onto my clients would not make sense in this part of my world.
Customers are more than happy I shoot in their home, in my quirky carport or in a park if it saves them money...and save them money it does.
I am sure that a few people would rather a "studio" with a sign on the front saying, "joe bloggs photography"...they can and do pay for that privilege.
Nov 29 12 08:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Stanley L Moore
Posts: 1,562
Houston, Texas, US


Since the early 1980s I have had a home studio. First in my apartment then my home and now in my newest home. Each one has been better than the last. I have never had objections as far as I know about it not being a real studio.

But I photograph males and I think they are a bit less critical of these things. I do not always say the studio is in my home but I sometimes do. In any case teh address is clearly a residential type address..... soemthing liuke Pin Oak Circle Lane. Unmistakeably a home address.  Fortunately my neighborhood os upper middle class looking with nice two story homes on a quiet cul-de-sac and people are reassured by the location. My house is only about 3000 sq ft so it is the smallest of my immediate neighbors which are 6000 sq ft, almost a mansion under construction, and the impressive of a wealthy businessman whose wife is President of teh Civic Association. So though my house is the smallest on the block it still looks imposing because of teh neighbors..... at least that is what my realtor says.

I do not think there is much downside to a home studio. I wish I had a real one with high ceilings but I make do. I am considering putting an addition on the house to suit but since I am a hobbyist I hate to spend the money on that. Maybe I will win the lottery. LOL. Everything in my port is done in the home studio except the obvious outdoor shots.

You can make decent photos in any location.
Nov 30 12 08:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
imcFOTO
Posts: 579
Bothell, Washington, US


Extrosy wrote:
How do models feel about shooting in a House / Townhouse vs a dedicated studio?

I can clear a 20x10 foot shooting space with high ceilings. 

Aside from having to deal with carpet, what are the general feelings about shooting at someone's home?

I realize you're asking from a model's perspective but let me share some thoughts from someone doing the home-studio thing.

Leaving aside the cost aspect - that's something you have to work out.

Your space is about the same as mine - and I would say it's the minimum you need if you are doing full body shots. There are times when I am shooting a tall model, with heels and raising her hands in the air, that I'm back up against my fireplace even using a 35mm lens. Oh what I'd give for another 10 feet.

The next question is how often will you be shooting and are you prepared to live in something that looks like a studio or do you want it to revert to just living space between shoots. I am now at the stage where my living room is pretty much dedicated to shooting. The big screen TV and couch rarely get used unless I plan to stop shooting for a couple of weeks (i.e. over Christmas). I live alone so it's not really a problem - I don't think it would work with a partner unless it was a dedicated room such as a rec room.

Do you have enough space to store lights, backdrops, props. They have a habit of accumulating and I can barely pack all my stuff away into my 2nd bedroom (which is also my office).

The other advantage I have is that when I shoot I also have the comforts of home - for drinks and snacks. Also I have my PC and printer, internet connection, music etc.

The possible downside - maybe professional aspects. I call mine a home-studio and the photos I show do look decent enough but there are some clients I couldn't imagine shooting here (for instance, I'm trying to get more work doing professional headshots - but I don't imagine a CEO coming here).

Also, my space is limited - so groups shots are out - even a 2-girl shoot is tight.

But overall, given the choice between spending money on a studio or money on equipment, props, clothing, even models, the large studio can wait.

Nov 30 12 10:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotographic Aspirations
Posts: 1,909
Long Beach, California, US


As with great tasting steak, cooked on the BBQ at home or in a $ 75 a plate restaurant .... its all about the presentation, taste, atmosphere, etc ... when its good its good , but when bad often very bad !
Nov 30 12 10:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,849
Olivet, Michigan, US


Abbitt Photography wrote:
I think it's hard to get an accurate answer on that.

I had one model who "vanished" prior to our home studio shoot.  She contacted me later with another casting, which she did not realize was me again, and ended up telling me that it was using a home studio that scared her off.

I rarely have a model tell me that, but it made me think:  How many cancelation are due to that?   It's hard to say.  I think most of the models who feel intimidated by home studio shoots are unlikely to voice the fact that's their reason, so I think it will be hard to get an accurate measure on that one.

When I was fairly new, I shot with a model who had disappeared in the middle of planning a few months before.  She said that it was because I was associated with another photographer who shot "in his basement."  That was literally true, but it was a 4000 SF walkout basement with a commercial studio; three bathrooms, two dressing rooms, offices, and a decades long history of major commercial projects shot there.  smile

Dec 01 12 06:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,849
Olivet, Michigan, US


Jojo West wrote:
I'm 5'9 and I've had to shoot in someone's basement in heels, a lot of the shots from those shoots make me look stumpy because the photographer didn't have enough room and the angles weren't the best. Personally I prefer a studio, BUT if the house is nice and the ceilings are high, I don't see why not.

5'11", in heels, in the short part of my second floor hallway.  Just downstairs from the attic "studio".  I've been in commercial buildings used as studios with 7 foot ceilings, and in houses with very high ceilings.  It's the photographer's job to come up with locations that fit the concept, or concepts that fit the location.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7006/6691369437_5fec371246_z.jpg

Dec 01 12 06:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
BlueMoonPics
Posts: 4,144
New York, New York, US


As I've stated earlier in this thread, I've had a couple of models balk at shooting in my home.  Models probably wont tell you they feel uncomfortable with the idea.  I think they would feel as if they're telling you you're a creep and they don't want to say that, even if they think you are. lol

What I did to ensure the model's comfort is to show them pictures of my setup and allow them to bring an assistant with them.  This would be someone to help them with makeup, hair or clothes.  This puts them more at ease, I think.

I recently did a shoot in my home studio.
I use my living room which is 18x15+ approx with 8 foot ceilings.
I set up a dedicated makeup station with mirror and lights, cleaned the whole apartment and set up the bathroom with new towels, different soaps still in the box, new toilet paper still wrapped, etc.  I wanted to make sure the place was clean, comfortable and professional as possible.

We did a bunch of headshots and full length work.  I think they came out very well.
I think the model liked the setup because she is willing to come back for more shots.  She even recommended her friend too!

This is one of the results...
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/121129/07/50b784ea35fc7_m.jpg
Dec 01 12 06:51 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Bunny Bombshell
Posts: 11,752
Huntington, West Virginia, US


I've done several shoots in home studios. Never had a problem
Dec 01 12 06:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
P I X I E
Posts: 35,267
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I think I've shot in home studios more than plain studios. Obviously I have no issues with them.
Dec 01 12 06:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
E e v a
Posts: 1,724
Nashville, Tennessee, US


It is no problem for me usually. The location may be iffy at first, but as long at the photographer knows his/her stuff, I will never be bothered. I had a photographer who shot wonderful work, in a tiny trailer. Looked crazy at first, but had good images.
Dec 01 12 06:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,861
Santa Ana, California, US


Before I had a studio (early 90s) I shot out of my apartment - didn't have any issues with the llamas about it. However, I had hardwood floors, not sure I'd want to deal with the headache of carpet.
Dec 01 12 06:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
P I X I E
Posts: 35,267
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


John Allan wrote:
Before I had a studio (early 90s) I shot out of my apartment - didn't have any issues with the models about it. However, I had hardwood floors, not sure I'd want to deal with the headache of carpet.

The only places here I shot that had carpet were hotel rooms...

Dec 02 12 12:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
bonkey
Posts: 23
Gainesville, Florida, US


It's no different to me as long as you are professional.
Dec 02 12 01:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sineann
Posts: 598
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


If the quality of work is strong enough, I don't care where the studio is located.  These are from an in-home studio:

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/100131/00/4b653fa080d15_m.jpg

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/100201/21/4b67b98de150d_m.jpg

I've shot in plenty of full-sized, professionally equipped studios that didn't give me the same quality results as these images from a smaller, in-home studio.
Dec 02 12 02:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Daniel Norton
Posts: 1,743
New York, New York, US


-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:

Real models don't care where you shoot as long as results are good.

Wannabe internet divas, on the other hand, may balk. That's a great clue for you to say, "NEXT!"




Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano
www.stefanobrunesci.com

+1

Dec 02 12 02:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelleth
Posts: 2,511
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I don't mind shooting in someone's house. A lot of photographer's use home studios or even just their usual home environment to shoot.
Dec 03 12 08:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Wynd Mulysa
Posts: 8,597
Berkeley, California, US


Extrosy wrote:
How do models feel about shooting in a House / Townhouse vs a dedicated studio?

..There's a difference?

Dec 04 12 01:16 am  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 2,913
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Extrosy wrote:
How do models feel about shooting in a House / Townhouse vs a dedicated studio?

I can clear a 20x10 foot shooting space with high ceilings. 

Aside from having to deal with carpet, what are the general feelings about shooting at someone's home?

Firstly, that you have to know them or have someone vouch for them first. Seconly, that you have to know where the place is and feel comforatable being there.

If there is sufficient room sure. Yet, once when I tried it was in a modern house with standard height ceilings. I'm somewhat tall and long and I felt pretty confined and the room was not very big which made me feel more confined. edit-I'm 5'10" in bare feet and long. I do not like to be "squished." However, folding up is one thing, being 'squished' a whole 'nuther one!

Went to a different room and it was open and felt fine, actually had higher ceilings there too. Same shoot, went to a different photographer's home and felt confined in the space. smile Great group of photographers though and I hope to shoot with them again. However, likely, outdoor if possible or in the 'great room.'

Jen
edit:
Oh,

Art of the nude wrote:
5'11", in heels, in the short part of my second floor hallway.  Just downstairs from the attic "studio".  I've been in commercial buildings used as studios with 7 foot ceilings, and in houses with very high ceilings.  It's the photographer's job to come up with locations that fit the concept, or concepts that fit the location.

I don't think I'd feel constrained at all in your 7 foot ceilings!
Jen

Dec 04 12 07:40 am  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 2,913
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


BlueMoonPics wrote:
...I have wood floors and a completely empty 15'x18' living room, devoid of furniture, dedicated to doing shoots.  And yes, it would save me a ton of cash and work from lugging all my lights and props around.  If only I could get the llamas to come over and shoot with me. hmm

Hi,
Um, 'waving hand' just pm me if you agree with my travel notice in my profile.

I think I am going to change my mind and perception of home shoots.

The one I mentioned previously was in a low ceilinged, carpeted, small room.

Jen

Dec 04 12 07:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,304
Salem, Oregon, US


i shot out of the house (garage mostly although sometimes the master bedroom and living room) for several years and had models and paying customers showing up to shoot.
Dec 04 12 08:20 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Loli Scotch
Posts: 78
Austin, Texas, US


Sylph Sia wrote:

The majority of the photographers I've worked with have a studio in their home actually now I come to think about it, and it's never been and issue or even something that I've thought twice about as long as they're professional. I think it's pretty common for photographers to have studios in their houses.

Yep, this +1.

Dec 06 12 10:51 am  Link  Quote 
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