login info join!
Forums > Model Colloquy > Giving Models Direction??? Search   Reply
12last
Photographer
Mad Hatter Imagery
Posts: 1,292
Buffalo, New York, US


I do photography as more of a hobby, but still I don't always like to give models a whole lot of direction for the sake of something genuine. Some models seem fine with improvising while some seem at a complete stand-still until they are told what to do. What is the best balance for giving a model direction from a model's point of view?
Oct 02 12 07:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
P I X I E
Posts: 35,308
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I don't read minds. I prefer to have more direction than not enough. Unless we've shot a couple times together, I don't really know how you work.
Oct 02 12 07:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 8,252
Tucson, Arizona, US


P I X I E wrote:
I don't read minds. I prefer to have more direction than not enough.

Exactly.

I never just stand still. I move around, but if I'm not doing what you want, you have to tell me that. Give directions that make sense and I'll follow them.

Oct 02 12 07:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ed Woodson Photography
Posts: 2,644
Savannah, Georgia, US


Early on, I was given this piece of advice.  It generally works.

"New Models require direction."  "Experienced Models expect direction."

I find it works quite well.  Even if the direction for the experienced models is that they have posing freedom.
Oct 02 12 07:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Isabella55
Posts: 152
West Hollywood, California, US


Really it depends on the model and what YOU want. I'm an actor so improvising at shoots is the main fun for me, but if a photographer tells me to do something,  I always take the direction. If a model seems shy, then by all means direction would help. However, if the model is confident in their choices but there is still something you want in the shoot, it is their job to execute it and should still be communicated by the photographer.
Oct 02 12 07:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
P I X I E
Posts: 35,308
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Isabella55 wrote:
Really it depends on the model and what YOU want. I'm an actor so improvising at shoots is the main fun for me, but if a photographer tells me to do something,  I always take the direction. If a model seems shy, then by all means direction would help. However, if the model is confident in their choices but there is still something you want in the shoot, it is their job to execute it and should still be communicated by the photographer.

I've been modeling for 4 years, and I still tend to work better with direction rather than without. That's just how *I* work. Doesn't make me any less talented.

Oct 02 12 07:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
NicoleNudes
Posts: 3,824
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Alabaster Crowley wrote:

Exactly.

I never just stand still. I move around, but if I'm not doing what you want, you have to tell me that. Give directions that make sense and I'll follow them.

+1

I always ask at the start of a shoot if there are any particular poses the photographer wants me to do.

After that I just do my own thing. That comes with experience though.
If the model is new you may have to direct her. For more experienced models, you may be able to do less directing unless you want a specific pose.

When someone hires me I don't expect them to give me any directions with regards to posing. That's part of the reason why they hired me.

Oct 02 12 08:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 21,147
Portland, Oregon, US


I don't like telling a model how to move; I just encourage movement.

I can explain the overall concept, and I can say what I would like to see, but my bottom line is that I like to engage the model's brain (so that I can avoid the empty stare).  We carry out a conversation.  I play music that encourages movement.  In a pinch, I'll give the model something to do -- keeping their hands occupied can produce great results.

But I don't like "poses" and I don't much care for "acting" -- I want the model to react.

So, if you ask me -- I like to give minimum direction. 

That being said, it's my job to make sure that the image is getting made, and the model can't see what the images in my brain look like.  I'll give feedback.  I might point out how what the model is doing is interacting with the lighting.  On occasion, I might even show the model an image on the camera's LCD, but that's rare, since pausing for image viewing slows things down.

All photographers are different, I expect.
Oct 02 12 08:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dgold
Posts: 10,273
North Smithfield, Rhode Island, US


NicoleNudes wrote:
1

I always ask at the start of a shoot if there are any particular poses the photographer wants me to do.

After that I just do my own thing. That comes with experience though.
If the llama is new you may have to direct her. For more experienced llamas, you may be able to do less directing unless you want a specific pose.

When someone hires me I don't expect them to give me any directions with regards to posing. That's part of the reason why they hired me.

...works for me with my hired experienced professional llamas!
1

Oct 02 12 08:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dgold
Posts: 10,273
North Smithfield, Rhode Island, US


P I X I E wrote:

I've been modeling for 4 years, and I still tend to work better with direction rather than without. That's just how *I* work. Doesn't make me any less talented.

...no siree Bob...Uhm Pixie !
You are indeed a talented model.

Oct 02 12 08:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
BTHPhoto
Posts: 6,771
Fairbanks, Alaska, US


Do you have a vision you want the model to help you create?  If so, you have to convey that to them.  Or, are you a documentarian who simply wishes to record a performance?  If so, hire a model to perform for you.
Oct 02 12 08:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camerosity
Posts: 5,102
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


It depends on the model.

Most of the models I work with can pose themselves better than I could pose them - and with more natural results. That's why they're the models.

At the beginning of a shoot, I tell the model the looks, moods, expressions, etc., that I want. I tell her which is the main light and how much freedom of movement she'll have (and again each time I change the lighting).

I also tell her when I'm shooting full-lengths, 3/4 lengths, waist up, etc. - so she'll know what area her hands need to be in.

If the model gives me the poses and looks I want, I give only minor instructions - as briefly as possible to avoid breaking the flow of the shoot.

"Head back." "Chin up." "Eyes toward me." "Right hand above your waist." "Arch your back." "Head slightly to the right." Things like that. From time to time I'll suggest a completely different pose.

Same with expressions. "Pouty." "Angry" "Confused." "Fierce." "Vulnerable." "Attitude." "Part your lips." "Stare me down."

If I say "that's great" or "let's work with that," it means that I want very small variations in pose for the next several shots. If I say "perfect light," that means I want very little movement in the model's head position for the next shots.

If I'm working with a very experienced model I've worked with before, I may appoint her vice president in charge of posing (inside joke) at the beginning of the shoot - but I still give direction as needed.

If it becomes obvious that more direction is required, I give more direction until I have the look I'm going for.
Oct 02 12 08:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
P I X I E
Posts: 35,308
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


dgold wrote:

...no siree Bob...Uhm Pixie !
You are indeed a talented model.

Thank you. smile

Oct 02 12 08:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Misty R H
Posts: 471
Anaheim, California, US


Camerosity wrote:
At the beginning of a shoot, I tell the model the looks, moods, expressions, etc., that I want. I tell her which is the main light and how much freedom of movement she'll have (and again each time I change the lighting).

I also tell her when I'm shooting full-lengths, 3/4 lengths, waist up, etc. - so she'll know what area her hands need to be in.

If the model gives me the poses and looks I want, I give only minor instructions - as briefly as possible to avoid breaking the flow of the shoot.

"Head back." "Chin up." "Eyes toward me." "Right hand above your waist." "Arch your back." Things like that. From time to time I'll suggest a completely different pose.

Same with expressions. "Pouty." "Angry" "Confused." "Vulnerable." "Attitude." "Part your lips." "Stare me down."

If I say "that's great" or "let's work with that," it means that I want very small variations in pose for the next several shots. If I say "perfect light," that means I want very little movement in the model's head position for the next shots.

If it becomes obvious that more direction is required, I give more direction until I have the look I'm going for.

This is exactly what I like to have as a model.  It's nice to know what the goal of the shoot is at the beginning.  The photographer has a different point of view than I do as a model, so its nice to know if what I am doing is working or needs some adjustment.  I think a partnership between the photographer and model gives the best results.  The model may have ideas the photographer doesn't and vice versa.

Oct 02 12 08:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 8,252
Tucson, Arizona, US


Camerosity wrote:
"Head back." "Chin up." "Eyes toward me." "Right hand above your waist." "Arch your back." "Head slightly to the right." Things like that.

This like this are super helpful to me. I know what my pose and expression are like without seeing it, but from your camera's angle it might need a little change to look right.

Oct 02 12 08:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
P I X I E
Posts: 35,308
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Alabaster Crowley wrote:

This like this are super helpful to me. I know what my pose and expression are like without seeing it, but from your camera's angle it might need a little change to look right.

Yep yep yep!

Oct 02 12 08:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Top Gun Digital
Posts: 1,229
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Mad Hatter Imagery wrote:
I do photography as more of a hobby, but still I don't always like to give models a whole lot of direction for the sake of something genuine. Some models seem fine with improvising while some seem at a complete stand-still until they are told what to do. What is the best balance for giving a model direction from a model's point of view?

The photographer is the one conducting the shoot.  You need to have a creative vision before you begin the shoot.  You need to convey your ideas to the model so she can make them in to reality.  If you can't provide adequate direction it's not likely you're going to be happy with the results.  It's OK if a model improvises to some extent but you really need to let her know what you're looking for.

Oct 02 12 08:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fred Brown Photo
Posts: 1,301
Chicago, Illinois, US


Top Gun Digital wrote:
The photographer is the one conducting the shoot.  You need to have a creative vision before you begin the shoot.  You need to convey your ideas to the model so she can make them in to reality.  If you can't provide adequate direction it's not likely you're going to be happy with the results.  It's OK if a model improvises to some extent but you really need to let her know what you're looking for.

I agree 100%

Oct 03 12 09:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
CamiAnn
Posts: 794
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Camerosity wrote:
It depends on the model.

Most of the models I work with can pose themselves better than I could pose them - and with more natural results.

At the beginning of a shoot, I tell the model the looks, moods, expressions, etc., that I want. I tell her which is the main light and how much freedom of movement she'll have (and again each time I change the lighting).

I also tell her when I'm shooting full-lengths, 3/4 lengths, waist up, etc. - so she'll know what area her hands need to be in.

If the model gives me the poses and looks I want, I give only minor instructions - as briefly as possible to avoid breaking the flow of the shoot.

"Head back." "Chin up." "Eyes toward me." "Right hand above your waist." "Arch your back." "Head slightly to the right." Things like that. From time to time I'll suggest a completely different pose.

Same with expressions. "Pouty." "Angry" "Confused." "Fierce." "Vulnerable." "Attitude." "Part your lips." "Stare me down."

If I say "that's great" or "let's work with that," it means that I want very small variations in pose for the next several shots. If I say "perfect light," that means I want very little movement in the model's head position for the next shots.

If I'm working with a very experienced model I've worked with before, I may appoint her vice president in charge of posing (inside joke) at the beginning of the shoot - but I still give direction as needed.

If it becomes obvious that more direction is required, I give more direction until I have the look I'm going for.

+1  In my opinion, most models, no matter how experienced they are, work better with some kind of direction...after all, we can't see what you see...what we may think looks great, may look better with that turn of the head or whatever the case may be.  I know I'm still learning all the time and always love getting good direction...I recently did a shoot with a guy who really knows how to position you so your butt looks better, your legs longer, etc...it may be uncomfortable as hell and awkward at times but it works, so I'm always thankful to the photographers who tell me these things.  smile

Oct 03 12 09:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camerosity
Posts: 5,102
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


Misty R H wrote:
This is exactly what I like to have as a model.  It's nice to know what the goal of the shoot is at the beginning.

Actually it's best if the shoot is planned in advance and everyone is on the same page before they show up for the shoot. Before the shoot, in most cases, we each have photos showing the looks we're discussing, and we've either seen the wardrobe or have photos of it. Everyone knows what we're shooting and in what order.

Everyone knows in advance what to expect and what's expected. If there's a prop or accessory that would complete the look, we have it before the shoot. )"Hey, does anyone know where to find a white dove on a Sunday evening?" You get the idea.)

When everything is decided in advance, there's time for mental pictures to form in my head. Shooting the mental picture in my head is a lot easier than trying to figure out what to do when I get the first look at the garment, location or whatever at the beginning of the shoot. It seems to make the model more comfortable as well.

That doesn't mean we can't improvise during the shoot. But it's always better to have a plan.

Oct 03 12 09:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
imcFOTO
Posts: 579
Bothell, Washington, US


Since I do a lot of TFCD work, many of the models I work with have little experience. It's easier to work with someone who actually wants some help with posing rather than someone who thinks they know but don't! 

Generally, I may send some posing guides in advance, take a bit of a timeout at the start of the shoot or anytime it's not working too well - to explain what I'm looking for and why some poses work better than others. I find I get a much better response if I come clean and say "This is a good pose because it will make you look slimmer and accentuate you good curves" - making it less of a mystery means the model picks it up much faster. Often I find that halfway thru a shoot I'm giving a lot less direction because the model is getting it on their own.

One thing I find that works is to demonstrate the poses rather than just talk - of course I look mild ridiculous (to say the least) at times as my body is really not built for these poses. But it really does help. Now if I could just stop myself subliminally staying in pose even when I'm behind the camera ....   well it's always good humored at least.
Oct 07 12 10:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
bmiSTUDIO
Posts: 1,733
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


P I X I E wrote:
I don't read minds. I prefer to have more direction than not enough. Unless we've shot a couple times together, I don't really know how you work.

Direction exists on different levels. First, direction should be discussed before the shoot based on the concept. Second you can direct a model's every move. Third you can refine a model's poses as needed. I prefer the first and third. If I have to direct a model too much during the shoot, the poses become mine and not the model's. While my portfolio may benefit, why any model would want a portfolio that isn't really her work is beyond me.

Oct 07 12 10:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
robert b mitchell
Posts: 1,347
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada


I give  the model a concept of the shoot and its various phases as to what I am trying to achieve. I then set her up in her location.Offer her basic direction and then refine it as necessay, but to do stiffle spontenaity. Most models I have found like direction, but not overkill. There is a fine line there at times!
Oct 07 12 11:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Gabrielle Heather
Posts: 10,064
Middle Island, New York, US


I definitely can appreciate someone guiding me through a shoot. Someone telling me to stay within these certain areas, and what they are focusing on so that I know what to hold very still and what I dont have to be that careful about. I prefer things to look more natural as I would think so might the photographer.

I am NOT fond of place your right hand slightly higher up 2 inches, and tilt your head to the right just a little then turn your foot outwards and move a bit to the right and, oh yeah now move that left hand onto your thigh........ then repeat another bunch of steps in a row....... ok, Ill do it as long as you pay me with a smile smile but I wont enjoy it so much.

I much rather enjoy a more laid back environment where we can trust each other. If I look like an asshole, PLEASE tell me and trust me to position myself not like a dick. Please give me some minimal direction to make us look the best. Thanks. I know im not some awesome model who needs no direction.
Oct 07 12 11:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
ChaiNoir
Posts: 345
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


P I X I E wrote:
I don't read minds. I prefer to have more direction than not enough. Unless we've shot a couple times together, I don't really know how you work.

EXCELLENT POINT!

Oct 07 12 11:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
ChaiNoir
Posts: 345
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


P I X I E wrote:

I've been modeling for 4 years, and I still tend to work better with direction rather than without. That's just how *I* work. Doesn't make me any less talented.

EXCELLENT RESPONSE AGAIN!!

Oct 07 12 11:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dave phoenix
Posts: 1,299
Phoenix, Arizona, US


when i first started taking pictures, i didn't really have any idea what to tell the model to do. the more i improved as a photographer, the more i realized that i didn't like most of what the models were doing, so it became important for me to direct models, otherwise i'd be wasting my own time taking photos of models is poses i didn't like.

still to this day, with some models i feel like i'm being mean if i micromanage every shot, so i'll snap too many frames that i know are throwaways just so i seem more friendly.

one interesting thing that i've noticed is that there is a certain type of model - she prides herself on her ability to pose herself, she is "internet famous" because she travels around the country, poses for meetup groups of photographers who are not exactly top tier, she prides herself on always doing her own hair, makeup, and styling. i've shot a few models who fit that description, and it always seems like they go through a posing routine, as if they've memorized a set of poses and always do the same poses, in the same order. when i try to direct a model like that, she will often move her hand, for example, for one shot, then just go back to her practiced routine of "good poses" after one flash of the strobes... like she's the one in control of the shoot. and that's extremely frustrating.
Oct 08 12 12:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dave phoenix
Posts: 1,299
Phoenix, Arizona, US


i don't think that a great model needs no direction.

i think a great model takes direction well, and can make suggestions or variations on a pose given to her, to provide the photographer with different options, perhaps even including something better than what he had in mind when he directed her into a pose.
Oct 08 12 12:24 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camerosity
Posts: 5,102
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


Gabrielle Heather wrote:


I am NOT fond of place your right hand slightly higher up 2 inches, and tilt your head to the right just a little then turn your foot outwards and move a bit to the right and, oh yeah now move that left hand onto your thigh........ then repeat another bunch of steps in a row....... ok, Ill do it as long as you pay me with a smile smile but I wont enjoy it so much.

I think you may be referring to one of my posts. Or, maybe not. Anyway I'll explain my rationale -just in case.

First, I'm old school. It used to be that models were trained to show two hands (with at least four fingers of each hand), two arms (not one hidden behind the body - or seemingly growing out of a boob at the elbow), two legs and two feet in photos.

Well, you don't want to see feet in a headshot, but I think you get the idea.

Also, I believe that white should show on both sides of the eyes. If a model is facing slightly away but turns her eyes back to the camera, for example, there may be white on only one side of each eye. The model can't see what I see - so when I see that, I'll direct her to look in a direction that will show white on both sides of the eye.

There are a lot of people on MM who disregard (or aren't aware of) these "rules." But I assure that there are many photo editors and art directors who pay attention to these things.

I tell models what area I'm shooting - headshots, waist-up, 3/4 length or full length. If you're shooting waist-up shots, you don't want the model's hands below the waist. Either you crop off her hand(s), or you turn what we both intended to be a waist-up pose into a 3/4 length or a full length.

If I'm shooting verticals, and the model's arms are outstretched so that it becomes a horizontal shot, and/or her hands are extended past the edge of the background (often a 14-foot wide cyc wall), I'll have her bring her arms back in.

If I'm shooting the model head-on, and she bends her knee and puts the bottom of her foot against the wall (not the cyc wall, obviously), she looks like an amputee. From the side, that pose often works - but not from the front.

If the main light is to the model's left, and she keeps facing right, and her face is in shadow (or maybe a wisp of hair is making a ghastly dark shadow down the middle of her cheek), generally I'll say something.

There's a phenomenon known as a "split profile," where a model's nose breaks the line of the cheek that's farthest from the camera. It's not flattering. Turning her head 2-3 inches back toward the camera will fix it.

In every shoot I will knowingly waste many shots by not mentioning these things, because I don't want to give such frequent direction that I don't want to break the flow or make the model self-conscious. Often the model will get back on track after 2-3 poses.

But at some point, if I'm not getting the look that's needed, I have to bring the model back to that look and get some usable shots.

And if a model is in what would be the "pose of the day," except for one flaw in the pose - I'll correct it right then. I don't want the pose of the day to end up as a reject.

Fortunately most of the models I work with (even on trade shoots) are experienced enough that the issues are minor and relatively infrequent.

Oct 08 12 12:48 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 8,252
Tucson, Arizona, US


Gabrielle Heather wrote:
I am NOT fond of place your right hand slightly higher up 2 inches, and tilt your head to the right just a little then turn your foot outwards and move a bit to the right and, oh yeah now move that left hand onto your thigh........ then repeat another bunch of steps in a row....... ok, Ill do it as long as you pay me with a smile smile but I wont enjoy it so much.

I agree. I had a photographer try to pose every square inch of me, and get annoyed and treat me like I was stupid when I didn't understand "rotate your thumb" vs "pivot your thumb." He would take ONE shot, then start all over. I wasn't allowed to move at all on my own.

I never got photos back from him. I'm not sure if that's related wink

Oct 08 12 12:59 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Anna Adrielle
Posts: 18,762
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


every model is different.

some models can move just fine: don't direct those

other might be a bit stiff at first: give them some guidelines and let them take it from there

others might have no idea what to do: give them a lot of guidance
Oct 08 12 01:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Simon Mittag
Posts: 132
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


I guess it depends on what type you are. do you take the picture or make the picture? How strong/often do you give feedback? Do you feel the shot is already there and if you interfere with the model you will ruin it because its no longer natural? You're a documentary picture taker.

Can you see the image clearly in your mind before you set foot in the studio? Will you communicate effectively with everyone involved until that very image is on your sensor? You are not afraid to repeat things 100x over with only small differences unto they are just right? You probably have a signature brand/shot and are visually strong, a picture maker.

I'm not saying either is right or wrong, they are just different ways of looking a your own work and how you go about achieving results. Including the level of direction required
Oct 08 12 03:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,703
Upland, California, US


Giving llamas Direction???

Some need it... some don't!  On my 200 image port, I gave direction to at least 80% of them... including Roxanne on the Cruiseboat Photoshoot... wink

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/101108/23/4cd8f9d6954ae.jpg
Oct 08 12 03:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Harold Rose
Posts: 2,925
Calhoun, Georgia, US


Mad Hatter Imagery wrote:
I do photography as more of a hobby, but still I don't always like to give models a whole lot of direction for the sake of something genuine. Some models seem fine with improvising while some seem at a complete stand-still until they are told what to do. What is the best balance for giving a model direction from a model's point of view?

Learn good body posture and  limb poses and angles..  Know what you want to end up with..     If I find it needed,  I will tell the model  what move I would like for her,,  but in a flowing conversation I will explain how that makes the pose better,   and not cause bad distortion  with a  squarshed leg ,  comfortable poses are the best place to start..  then lead on with modification...Most models love to learn why poses work,  ands what is awkward..

Oct 08 12 03:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Harold Rose
Posts: 2,925
Calhoun, Georgia, US


Select Models wrote:
Giving Models Direction???

Some need it... some don't!  On my 200 image port, I gave direction to at least 80% of them... including Roxanne on the Cruiseboat Photoshoot... wink

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/101108/23/4cd8f9d6954ae.jpg

This type of photo turns me off.    I would not produce something with all the lines,   distorted body,  and a background that  distracts,  feet bigger than legs etc.

Oct 08 12 03:49 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 8,252
Tucson, Arizona, US


Anna Adrielle wrote:
some models can move just fine: don't direct those

I don't think a photographer should never direct a model at all. Maybe s/he is moving well, but that doesn't mean s/he can read the photographer's mind and do exactly what they want.

Oct 08 12 03:49 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 8,252
Tucson, Arizona, US


Harold Rose wrote:
This type of photo turns me off.    I would not produce something with all the lines,   distorted body,  and a background that  distracts,  feet bigger than legs etc.

Unsolicited critique. Not good.

Oct 08 12 03:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,703
Upland, California, US


Harold Rose wrote:
This type of photo turns me off.    I would not produce something with all the lines,   distorted body,  and a background that  distracts,  feet bigger than legs etc.

That's OK dude... I don't create digital art designed to excite you... and your unsolicited critique means ZIP to me (you tell'm AC babe).  I've got dozens of comments and lists on this image from people who think it's cool... all that matters here.  Here's another one I'm sure you'll love... lol

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/110406/10/4d9c9ccd81f63.jpg
Oh and PS... I got more comments on one of my pics, than you have in your entire port... and you've been here SIX years... wink

Oct 08 12 03:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Drew Smith Photography
Posts: 5,209
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


Wow! Way to hijack a thread for your own self promoting purposes.  ^^

OP - I've always told the model that I'm going to shoot her to get my settings correct at the start of the shoot and she can simply loosen up and hit any poses she likes.

I find this takes the pressure of a little and lets them get warmed-up, so to speak. It also gives me some idea of how experienced they really are, and therefore how much direction they might need.
Oct 08 12 04:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Eros Studios
Posts: 690
Boston, Massachusetts, US


dave phoenix wrote:
i don't think that a great llama needs no direction.

i think a great llama takes direction well, and can make suggestions or variations on a pose given to her, to provide the photographer with different options, perhaps even including something better than what he had in mind when he directed her into a pose.

Bingo!

Oct 08 12 04:39 am  Link  Quote 
12last   Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers