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Photographer
udor
Posts: 21,966
New York, New York, US


I have not had a formal education in the arts or photography, I am self-taught.

Photography since I was a child, read books, worked in a photolab in my youth (starting at age 15 to almost 18), shot for a German photo/press agency in my late teens and early twenties.

Later on in life, including in the past few years, I studied painting, drawing, lighting for photography and watch youtube lectures on photography, as well as art history, impressionism and biographies of painters and photographers.

I watch documentaries, e.g. Nat Geo (or Discovery Channel) on the science of beauty, human behavior etc.

I constantly am trying to understand art better and the psychology behind art making and human perception. 

Most recently, I think it was two days ago, I downloaded from the documentary channel "Cracking The Colour Code":

"An unprecedented global journey to explore the frontiers of how we view colour, make colour and use the power of colour to communicate meaning. Colour is a fundamental part of our world. Landscapes, animals, fashion, painting, movies, food – everything around us resonates with the language of colour. All our waking lives – and even in our dreams – we navigate our way through a world of colour. Yet, whoever we are, colour has the power to stop us in our tracks – and to make us wonder."

What do YOU do to further your skill and knowledge as an artist?

Please share! smile
Oct 06 12 10:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


I used to study and keep up with trends but I realized a few things:

1. The exercise is ultimately futile due to the flux of society's tastes. In other words, receiving recognition is more a matter of luck than hard work.

2. Little value is placed on fundamental knowledge.

3. The process started to influence my own work.

I do try to stay current with technique. I suppose that counts.
Oct 06 12 10:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Erlinda
Posts: 7,036
London, England, United Kingdom


I don't do any of that stuff hmm

I honestly just experience and hope for the best LMAO
Oct 06 12 11:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Eridu
Posts: 623
Boston, Massachusetts, US


William Kious wrote:
I used to study and keep up with trends but I realized a few things:

1. The exercise is ultimately futile due to the flux of society's tastes. In other words, receiving recognition is more a matter of luck than hard work.

2. Little value is placed on fundamental knowledge.

3. The process started to influence my own work.

I do try to stay current with technique. I suppose that counts.

Exactly!

Oct 06 12 11:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mortonovich
Posts: 5,299
San Diego, California, US


I assist and intern whenever possible. I learn a lot by working with
those further along than myself.
Oct 06 12 11:19 am  Link  Quote 
Model
JoJo
Contest Queen
Posts: 24,662
Clearwater, Florida, US


Photography is a technical art. Once you have a reasonable understanding of the technical fundamentals you may experiment with the artistic side.

Sure, you can learn the technical fundamentals in a formal (classroom) setting but then you can also learn the technical fundamentals of riding a bicycle in a classroom. The real ‘classroom’ for photography, and bicycle riding, is in practical application.
It is common knowledge that you don't know how to ride a bicycle until you have fallen off - same with photography wink

Just as with almost all other technical arts photography is perpetually evolving.
The trick is to make enough time to keep up with the advancements in the technical fundamentals.

The best way to do this is to communicate with your peers; talk/read, watch, experiment, learn.
Oct 06 12 11:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 21,966
New York, New York, US


JoJo wrote:
Just as with almost all other technical arts photography is perpetually evolving.
The trick is to make enough time to keep up with the advancements in the technical fundamentals.

The best way to do this is to communicate with your peers; talk/read, watch, experiment, learn.

I am not sure if I am clear about my quest for knowledge... it goes way beyond the merely technical aspect.

I try to understand what makes the human brain tick, how it perceives color, art, art history, painting techniques... psychology etc.

I find those topics fascinating and the more I understand about those things, the more I gain knowledge about human ideas, the better I believe I can convey my art (besides photography I am also a surrealistic painter)...

Oct 06 12 11:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Blaneyphoto
Posts: 545
New York, New York, US


udor wrote:
What do YOU do to further your skill and knowledge as an artist?

I'm in the process of filling out an application for another Masters program (studio art this time). As a NYC art teacher, I need to keep my subject area knowledge and skills sharp. All my graduate study so far has been in Education so it'll be nice to go back to the studio, which I haven't done since my BFA program - 20 years ago.

Oct 06 12 11:47 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 21,966
New York, New York, US


Blaneyphoto wrote:

I'm in the process of filling out an application for another Masters program (studio art this time). As a NYC art teacher, I need to keep my subject area knowledge and skills sharp. All my graduate study so far has been in Education so it'll be nice to go back to the studio, which I haven't done since my BFA program - 20 years ago.

NICE!

Oct 06 12 01:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
JoJo
Contest Queen
Posts: 24,662
Clearwater, Florida, US


JoJo wrote:
Just as with almost all other technical arts photography is perpetually evolving.
The trick is to make enough time to keep up with the advancements in the technical fundamentals.

The best way to do this is to communicate with your peers; talk/read, watch, experiment, learn.
udor wrote:
I am not sure if I am clear about my quest for knowledge... it goes way beyond the merely technical aspect.

I try to understand what makes the human brain tick, how it perceives color, art, art history, painting techniques... psychology etc.

I find those topics fascinating and the more I understand about those things, the more I gain knowledge about human ideas, the better I believe I can convey my art (besides photography I am also a surrealistic painter)...

Many people learn the basics, go out and shoot and wonder why they never improve/grow/prosper.
These are the people that continually regurgitate the mechanics but have little if any idea why. They may think they are creating art (and in their own mind are) but the rest of the world sees their attempts a unidimensional reproduction

Then there are those that learn the basics AND the ‘why’ of the art.
These are the people on the perpetual quest for the mastery of their art AND desirous of moving forward by exploring the ‘why’.
These are the people that will continually produce art, be it to the left or right of the accepted art.

Look at Van Gogh – he couldn't even give his art away to cover his bar bill - he purposely did things that were unacceptable in his time… and it’s taken the rest of us “artistic peons” more than a hundred years to figure out Van Gogh had risen to a degree of mastery of art in his time that we have yet to completely comprehend today.

Oct 06 12 01:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 7,667
Tucson, Arizona, US


I'm in art school, for photography.
Oct 06 12 01:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 7,667
Tucson, Arizona, US


JoJo wrote:
Sure, you can learn the technical fundamentals in a formal (classroom) setting but then you can also learn the technical fundamentals of riding a bicycle in a classroom. The real ‘classroom’ for photography, and bicycle riding, is in practical application.

Apples and oranges.

There IS practical application of photography in a classroom setting. You don't just sit in a class reading books about photography. You actually do it.

Oct 06 12 01:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
JoJo
Contest Queen
Posts: 24,662
Clearwater, Florida, US


udor wrote:
What do YOU do to further your skill and knowledge as an artist?
Blaneyphoto wrote:
I'm in the process of filling out an application for another Masters program (studio art this time). As a NYC art teacher, I need to keep my subject area knowledge and skills sharp. All my graduate study so far has been in Education so it'll be nice to go back to the studio, which I haven't done since my BFA program - 20 years ago.

And this continued quest for 'more' is what I think udor is referring to.

You must move forward... or you stagnate.

Oct 06 12 02:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Pat Berrett
Posts: 271
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


In addition to running a full time studio and problem solving all day, I teach.

I have been teaching for the past 20 years and find that student questions reveal the gaps in my knowledge about both the technical aspects of photography and the aesthetic side.
A simple question about where ideas come from or why certain compositions work better than others can lead to great insight.



“He who works with his hands is a laborer.
He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman.
He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.”
― St. Francis of Assisi
Oct 06 12 02:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 21,966
New York, New York, US


JoJo wrote:
And this continued quest for 'more' is what I think udor is referring to.

You must move forward... or you stagnate.

Yes!

Oct 06 12 02:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Eridu
Posts: 623
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Pat Berrett wrote:
In addition to running a full time studio and problem solving all day, I teach.

I have been teaching for the past 20 years and find that student questions reveal the gaps in my knowledge about both the technical aspects of photography and the aesthetic side.
A simple question about where ideas come from or why certain compositions work better than others can lead to great insight.



“He who works with his hands is a laborer.
He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman.
He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.”
― St. Francis of Assisi

"Better the illusions tat exhalt us than ten-thousand truths."

-A. Pushkin

Oct 06 12 02:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
JoJo
Contest Queen
Posts: 24,662
Clearwater, Florida, US


Alabaster Crowley wrote:
I'm in art school, for photography.

Excellent! Keep on with the quest.

JoJo wrote:
Sure, you can learn the technical fundamentals in a formal (classroom) setting but then you can also learn the technical fundamentals of riding a bicycle in a classroom. The real ‘classroom’ for photography, and bicycle riding, is in practical application.
Alabaster Crowley wrote:
Apples and oranges.

There IS practical application of photography in a classroom setting. You don't just sit in a class reading books about photography. You actually do it.

I think you are taking an oversimplified view of my statement.

Although a student goes through the mechanics of clicking the shutter in class (and doing practical application assignments), the real learning of the ‘art’ does not begin until you are called upon (or receive the calling) to actually create art.


As for my CV, I have been learning the ‘art’ for almost 30 years. I received my DFA in 2009 and my quest still continues even today… and I still do not even come close to the understanding of ‘art’ that the illiterate and unschooled Van Gogh demonstrated over 100 years ago.

Oct 06 12 02:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alabaster Crowley
Posts: 7,667
Tucson, Arizona, US


JoJo wrote:

Excellent! Keep on with the quest.

It's such a challenge at times, but I feel SO good when I finish a project and do well on it. My school is amazing too, because it's so well rounded. I'm learning so many different forms of art.

JoJo wrote:
Although a student goes through the mechanics of clicking the shutter in class (and doing practical application assignments), the real learning of the ‘art’ does not begin until you are called upon (or receive the calling) to actually create art.

Do you mean "called upon" like an assignment for a job, or like you "hear the calling" from art, in a more intangible way?

Oct 06 12 03:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
JoJo
Contest Queen
Posts: 24,662
Clearwater, Florida, US


Alabaster Crowley wrote:
Do you mean "called upon" like an assignment for a job, or like you "hear the calling" from art, in a more intangible way?

Let's get all biblical for a moment...

One day you may awaken and see before you 'the quest'. (you'll know it when you see it)
If you accept this 'quest' you will be consumed and plagued by it until you complete the quest.
If you complete the quest successfully the angels will sing... and then those damn angels will show up with yet another quest to haunt your creativity.


or does 'all consuming passion' work more appropriately wink

Oct 06 12 03:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
intense_puppy
Posts: 864
Brighton, England, United Kingdom


I repeatedly try and work on ideas and concepts that are beyond my capabilities.
Sure they usually fail or don't exactly turn out like I planned, but I'm always learning that way.

I also do this with the tech side all the time.
I experimented with fluorescent lights for a bit and wondered why my slides had a green tinge to them. When it dawned on me I dumped those lights.
Also, trashing an entire roll of 16mm film due to threading it badly taught me a lesson I will never forget.
I also had an entire shoot ruined by weird flash sync problems on an old camera. Took me, oh, 3 months to work out what the hell had happened with that one smile

The pits for me is actually a photo/film shoot that turns out exactly like I expected. I learn nothing.
Oct 06 12 03:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 4,068
Alexandria, Virginia, US


The main thing that I do to continue my education is to shoot -

to not be "afraid to take bad pictures"

to experiment

I had the good fortune to grow up with manual cameras with no meters - to learn the "sunny16" and how to use the zone system -

there was no "P for professional" mode -  you learned about DOF control, the effects of aperture and shuttter speed choices

you learned solid composition back then -  not just the use of leading or trailing lines, but how to isolate your subject, how to apply the golden ratios to differing compositions

You exposed your film based on the zone system and "edited" your images in the darkroom -

I shot photojournalism and documentary photography plus landscape and portraiture with manual cameras up to the 8x10 since the 60s.

So this was a good foundation but it did not prepare me for the different ways that CCD and CMOS chips "see" the world, as I could with all of my favorite emulsions.

And it did not prepare me for something that I had never ventured into - studio based work.

Taking on studio based work in April of 2011 was a part of my "continuing education"  and I found out quickly both how fortunate I was to have a solid technical foundation *and* how much I had to learn in this milieu. Some of my
early "work" in studio was pretty bad.  Not sure how good it is now but it's not putrid lol.

So yes, for me continuing education is hands on -  shooting new things with new equipment, new techniques.  Avoiding becoming a one or two or three trick pony. 

Almost fifty years of shooting and I still love it - because I've never let myself stagnate....

My only wish for the newer generations of photographers would be to spend a year with a manual camera, a 50mm f1.4 lens and a single emulsion, and learn the technical side of photography.  It would be amazing to see what some of the very artistic but not terribly technically competent could achieve if they new the rules and new when and how to break them to advantage....
Oct 06 12 03:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 2,883
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


udor wrote:
...
Most recently, I think it was two days ago, I downloaded from the documentary channel "Cracking The Colour Code":

"An unprecedented global journey to explore the frontiers of how we view colour, make colour and use the power of colour to communicate meaning. Colour is a fundamental part of our world. Landscapes, animals, fashion, painting, movies, food – everything around us resonates with the language of colour. All our waking lives – and even in our dreams – we navigate our way through a world of colour. Yet, whoever we are, colour has the power to stop us in our tracks – and to make us wonder."

What do YOU do to further your skill and knowledge as an artist?

Please share! smile

edit upfront because my reply is all over the place...I 'get' passion for creativity and expression from within to out.
Yet, my reply is a bit wacky! End edit.

It is likely that I am oversimplifying my statement but, isn't it that the more exposure or taste of art, (any moving art...) increase your appreciation for it? Similar to how tasting good wine changes your perspective on other wines, (no, not expensive, just good.)

Ah, Perfume side bar, (could scent have a refined appreciation, like art, food, wine and what not?) okay, sidebar:... the better scents you experience the more you appreciate the sublte mixtue and recipe of scents, (I absolutely adore the scent Fracas or anything with tuberose or plumeria and 15 years ago I couldn't stand them!)

...occasionaly gardenia too, just not altogether. More side bar, the tuberose has a powerful midnote punch that comes up 30 minutes later and overtakes you until it subdues to a misty calm endnote.

Okay, side bar done. I think I need to go experience some wine and chocolate to expand my taste-pallete, or um, colour!
Jen

Oct 06 12 08:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dgold
Posts: 10,269
North Smithfield, Rhode Island, US


JoJo wrote:
Look at Van Gogh – he couldn't even give his art away to cover his bar bill - he purposely did things that were unacceptable in his time… and it’s taken the rest of us “artistic peons” more than a hundred years to figure out Van Gogh had risen to a degree of mastery of art in his time that we have yet to completely comprehend today.

+1


...when you stop learning, it is time to die.

Oct 06 12 08:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 20,975
Portland, Oregon, US


I believe that there are two aspects to making photographic images:
     The technical aspect, and
     The aesthetic aspect.


The technical aspect is easy to learn, from books, tutorials, practice, classes, etc.  In fact, it's so easy that I won't spend any more time on the subject.

The aesthetic aspect is far more important.  After all, I'd rather look at an interesting photograph (of modest technical quality) than a technically perfect but boring photograph.

It is, however, more difficult to further your aesthetic abilities.  Some ideas:

...  Find a mentor; review your work on a regular basis.  Some classes and
     workshops can be great, too, provided that the teacher is a good one.

...  Devote 10% to 25% (or more) of your exposures to working outside your
     comfort zone.  Never be satisfied by past successes.

...  Once a month, I visit all the art galleries in walking distance (and there are
     dozens).

...  I find it occasionally useful to get together a small number of photographers
     and models, go to an interesting location, and work together.  A lot can be
     learned by observing how other photographers work.  Not only will you see
     some ideas that you might want to try, you'll also see techniques that you
     might want to avoid.

...  Force yourself to photograph that which you are afraid to photograph.

...  Get a cheap camera that is easy to hold & use.  Set it on full "automatic",
     and photograph your life as you live it.  Create snapshots & don't worry about
     the technical aspects of your pictures.  Do what you can when photoediting,
     sure, but don't punish yourself if the images are blurry.  Embrace the blur.

...  Change perspectives:  lie on the ground; climb a ladder, photograph your
     subject from behind, etc.  Step really close.  Step really far away.

...  Play with different compositions -- move your subject matter away from
     the center of the image. 

...  I tend to analyze every image I see, including my own:
     o  How was the image lit?
     o  Does the image work?
     o  How would I improve the image?
     o  What was communicated to the model?
     o  How did the photographer get that reaction from the model?
     o  etc.

...  I give myself "assignments".  For example, here's an assignment that I've
     tried often but have yet to do to my satisfaction:  create a three image
     sequence that tells a story.

...  If you find yourself repeating yourself, try a different photographic genre for
     a time. 

...  If you aren't failing often, you aren't trying hard enough.  Remember your
     failures are more educational than your successes.


Bottom line:  keep busy, enjoy your successes, but don't be satisfied with success.
Oct 07 12 08:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
fullmetalphotographer
Posts: 2,733
Fresno, California, US


I started at the other end of the spectrum I started around when I was 16 in high school. I had a very good high school teacher who was friends with John Sexton. So I was exposed to the world of photography, when I hit college I majored in photography then later switched to photojournalism. I am poor at nature shots and landscapes. People have always been my strength.

While still in college I started working full time for a daily newspaper. After working for newspapers for 20 years, I went into commercial and editorial work.

I will attend an occasional workshop, I read, and keep up with trends but find myself being less inspire by western art and more by Japanese art.

I am debating taking some video courses and maybe a couple of more Photo courses. Mainly just to expand the horizons a little. wink I seem to go through some melancholy were I need to push my limits.
Oct 07 12 09:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Brian T Rickey
Posts: 4,007
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


I am constantly looking at light and its effects on objects it touches.  That's all I need dude.
Oct 07 12 09:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kincaid Blackwood
Posts: 23,313
Atlanta, Georgia, US


JoJo wrote:
Although a student goes through the mechanics of clicking the shutter in class (and doing practical application assignments), the real learning of the ‘art’ does not begin until you are called upon (or receive the calling) to actually create art.

You seem to be implying that the only thing that the student gets in his/her education is some button-pushing mechanics that any primate could master…

Oct 07 12 10:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kincaid Blackwood
Posts: 23,313
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Looknsee Photography wrote:
I believe that there are two aspects to making photographic images:
     The technical aspect, and
     The aesthetic aspect.

There is a third aspect to most photographic images (and, by extension, most art):  the theory/meaning.


Picasso's Guernica isn't just a funny picture of horses and people… some lesson in applied cubism.  It's about war and suffering.  The brutality that innocents endure in times of bloody conflict.  The senseless violence that is dismissed off-handedly as "collateral damage."  If you're only ever concerned with technical and aesthetics, you'll only ever create pretty, technically sound and utterly meaningless work. 

Which isn't to say that I haven't had aspirations no more complicated than making pretty pictures at times.  I have.  But that is not the totality of it and to think so is limiting one's expression.

Oct 07 12 10:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
R80
Posts: 2,567
Marceline, Missouri, US


Try to keep current of any new trends while not being overly influenced by them.  I always enjoy art museums, galleries, coffee shops with artist's work and the like.  Also, I try to check with the programming on Ovation often to see if they have any new shows on artists and masters in their fields.  They seem to have more than Discovery or the Learning Channel, but I don't exclude them.

I don't regret that I have years ago relocated to the "sticks", I'd never live in another city, but I do sorely miss the artistic offerings of large cities and always try to schedule time off to run around and find what's there when I'm working in such areas.

Read a ship load of books and attempt to divert my own work away from what everyone else is doing.  Experimentation, variance of technique, whatever I can to come up with something different.  To me, art has always been "creative art".

I learned long ago that studies are to inspire and motivate, not so much to imitate a style of the artist you are studying.
Oct 07 12 10:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
intense_puppy
Posts: 864
Brighton, England, United Kingdom


Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
Picasso's Guernica isn't just a funny picture of horses and people… some lesson in applied cubism.  It's about war and suffering.  The brutality that innocents endure in times of bloody conflict.  The senseless violence that is dismissed off-handedly as "collateral damage."  If you're only ever concerned with technical and aesthetics, you'll only ever create pretty, technically sound and utterly meaningless work.

Could not agree with this more.
Sadly, I'm still in pretty-pictures-of-pretty-girls mode. sad

Thanks for the reminder....

Oct 07 12 11:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
JoJo
Contest Queen
Posts: 24,662
Clearwater, Florida, US


JoJo wrote:
Although a student goes through the mechanics of clicking the shutter in class (and doing practical application assignments), the real learning of the ‘art’ does not begin until you are called upon (or receive the calling) to actually create art.
Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
You seem to be implying that the only thing that the student gets in his/her education is some button-pushing mechanics that any primate could master…

If you wish to go this route; then yes.

Pat Berrett wrote:
“He who works with his hands is a laborer.
He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman.
He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist.”
― St. Francis of Assisi

You can teach the basics to most people (and most primates) - they can replicate your teaching - this elevates them to "labourer" status.

You can attempt to motivate and introduce desire to a labourer - if the labourer accepts AND THINKS the labourer's status is elevated to that of craftsman.

Now comes the most difficult part, trying to teach a person "art".
Stop now because you can not teach "art" - you can teach the mechanics of "art", you can teach the fundamentals of "art"... but you can not 'teach' someone how to be artistic - that comes from within.

Oct 07 12 11:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
fullmetalphotographer
Posts: 2,733
Fresno, California, US


JoJo wrote:
You can attempt to motivate and introduce desire to a labourer - if the labourer accepts AND THINKS the labourer's status is elevated to that of craftsman.

Now comes the most difficult part, trying to teach a person "art".
Stop now because you can not teach "art" - you can teach the mechanics of "art", you can teach the fundamentals of "art"... but you can not 'teach' someone how to be artistic - that comes from within.

Bruce Lee for me said it best; "Learn the principle, abide by the principle, and dissolve the principle. In short, enter a mold without being caged in it. Obey the principle without being bound by it. LEARN, MASTER AND ACHIEVE!"

Oct 08 12 03:10 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 21,024
New York, New York, US


I teach, assist and also study at ICP (which is very close to you) and sometimes also take a class at SVA (also close to you).

If you have iTunes theres a great series from SVA that you can watch on photography as well as other art history classes from good universities.
Oct 08 12 08:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


My journey to photography was backasswards.

I went to college for marketing and gravitated more toward the creative end. Got my Marketing degree then went back to school for graphic design. It wasn't until I began to work with ad agencies that I really took an interest in photography.

I'm self taught as well and read and read...everything. Magazine articles, books, online. And I live on NatGeo, Discovery and Smithsonian Channel.

Over the past few years I probably spend more time learning than doing. Something I'm not proud of but a trap it's tough to get out of. To combat that, when I'm not working on a paid project, I try to create assignments for myself - design and photography. It at least fools my mind into thinking I'm being productive.
Oct 08 12 08:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lee Nutter
Posts: 160
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


I value lateral thinking. How can you take the lessons you learn in life and apply them in your art? It gets to the stage where the question becomes, how can you not!

That's not to say that I don't devour related information like it's going out of fashion, and there isn't a day that goes by that I'm not directly involved in my art in one way or another.

But I'm an obsessive perfectionist insomniac, and have been my entire life smile
Oct 10 12 06:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Harris Photography
Posts: 494
Edison, New Jersey, US


udor wrote:
What do YOU do to further your skill and knowledge as an artist?

I agree that something formal, either a class or a good book, are necessary to learn the technical fundamentals. I have found that an occasional class or quality workshop are useful to exchange thoughts on my work along with that of the others in the session. The most important thing is to photograph regularly and have people give the images honest critique.

Oct 10 12 07:24 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Jules NYC
Posts: 15,895
New York, New York, US


I'm an Art School drop-out.

I graduated from the University of San Francisco and had a Fine Art minor.
The Academy of Art College was too expensive on top of it.

This guy explains it all well:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgj5HMpxh3g

I respect education in itself but education doesn't make a smart person smarter or an artful person more artful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2_dGkqYu6M

As for what I do, I sing, I write, I *do*.

Those Who Can’t Do, Teach

I respect teachers too...
Good ones.
Oct 10 12 08:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Drew Smith Photography
Posts: 5,209
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


I try to move out of my comfort zone on occasions.

I try to emulate others to discover how I can make it my own.

I try to remember that there is learning in everything - even when it's an epic fail. smile
Oct 10 12 08:06 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Jules NYC
Posts: 15,895
New York, New York, US


What a fucking great short.

Scorcese!

http://youtu.be/1e0Na26J9Mw
Oct 10 12 08:16 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Jules NYC
Posts: 15,895
New York, New York, US


I watched 'Ted' last night.

Seth is an Artist.

http://youtu.be/NPzHDxJbDXI
Oct 10 12 08:22 am  Link  Quote 
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