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Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Kaouthia wrote:

Yup, you can shoot all the way up to 1/8000th with Nikon flashes... although, not on the D600, obviously. big_smile

You do lose some power from the flashes (up to about 2 stops at 1/8000th).

LOL  Copy that.  1/4000 limit for the D600.
So basically I have been worrying about a non-issue since I use speedlights.  smile

Scott

Oct 07 12 09:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kaouthia
Posts: 3,152
Lancaster, England, United Kingdom


Well, it's not really a non-issue.  Whenever your flashes are used in HSS mode, they're firing at a higher power (at least with the way Nikon's works, I hear Canon's is different, but haven't looked into it), because it has to fire a series of lower power flashes in order to be able to evenly expose the scene (because only a small section of the sensor is seeing the flash at any one time).

If your front curtain is up halfway across the sensor when the rear curtain's about to go, the flash fires, then when the front curtain has cleared and the rear curtain is halfway up your sensor, it fires again to expose the other half of the image.

The faster your shutter speed, the smaller the gap between curtains, and the more pulses your flash has to fire (which is why you lose power the faster your shutter speed once the total output of the mini-flashes reaches maximum power).

So, while you may be able to get the shot... You run into potential overheating issues, slower recycle times, and shorter battery life.

If I need to use HSS, I'll usually have 2 or 3 flashes working together, so that between them they can run at a lower power and have faster recycle times.  I don't worry so much about the battery life as I usually take a few dozen spares with me anyway.
Oct 07 12 09:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 3,973
Alexandria, Virginia, US


Andrea Acailawen wrote:

Fotografica Gregor wrote:
I think Nikon knew how important this feature was to professionals and left it off on purpose to further distinguish this camera from their semi-pro line.

Same. It would be a non-factor for me, as well. I never accidentally change my settings, so I have never needed to use it.

it is important to me because I have shoots for publication or commercial use that have quite a bit of money and time invested in them and I have anywhere from a few to fifteen minutes or so  to get "the shot"

These shots need to be *perfect* out of the camera.

If my fat thumb nudges either the aperture or shutter speed I get non-usable shots.

It has happened to me and to other pros I know before when just shooting so I / we *always* lock in our aperture and shutter speed settings on a money shoot.

This is why Nikon have included this feature on their pro and semi-pro cameras.

Oct 07 12 10:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sichenze Photography
Posts: 266
Front Royal, Virginia, US


I will say that I own a D7000 and a D800.  I also have a D4 but that is for a different purpose.   I think the fact that you can lock the aperture and Shutter speed is a great thing.  I use it all the time. If you are shooting in the studio put the camera down to move a light and pick it up and sometimes, yes I have hit the aperture or shutter dial with my hand. I do it less on the D4 but on the D800 I seem to do it all the time. I did it on my D700 as well.  If you can swing it I would get the D800 and also I would upgrade your 70-300 as well.   The D800 is wonderful for landscape adn studio. I am waiting now for a D4x that will replace the D800 one day but that will be a while.  Now as to where things will be published and the D600 is fine. It is fine for that but it does have a few limitations and if you have not done the HSS and the extra detail is amazing.
Oct 07 12 10:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Connor Photography
Posts: 6,130
Elkton, Maryland, US


Fotografica Gregor wrote:
If my fat thumb nudges either the aperture or shutter speed I get non-usable shots.

It has happened to me and to other pros I know before when just shooting so I / we *always* lock in our aperture and shutter speed settings on a money shoot.

This is why Nikon have included this feature on their pro and semi-pro cameras.

Yes, this lock feature is very important to me too.

Oct 07 12 10:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kaouthia
Posts: 3,152
Lancaster, England, United Kingdom


Connor Photography wrote:
Yes, this lock feature is very important to me too.

Aye, it's a handy feature to have, although I don't knock the command dials anywhere near as often as I do the aperture ring on D & Ai-S lenses when using my older film bodies.  I've gaffer taped the aperture ring at a set spot so it doesn't move more times than I care to remember.

Oct 07 12 10:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


I just want to thank everyone who has contributed to this thread up to this point.  You guys are a wealth of knowledge and I really appreciate both your time and your patience.

Scott
Oct 07 12 10:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fred Greissing
Posts: 5,743
Los Angeles, California, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:

Thanks Fred.  I checked out the 85 but I was more impressed with the VR on the 105.  With either the D600 or D800 I was thinking the high resolution might benefit from the VR system.  I know the 85 f/1.4 would give me more options on DOF though.  Thanks Sir.

Scott

Very true. VR makes a world of difference in so many situations.
VR also helps make you far more relaxed when shooting at slower speeds, even 1/60th of a second.

Oct 07 12 10:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Fred Greissing wrote:

Very true. VR makes a world of difference in so many situations.
VR also helps make you far more relaxed when shooting at slower speeds, even 1/60th of a second.

I have a tripod/monopod combo but I prefer to handhold most of my shots so VR definitely plays a part in my keeper/trash ratio.

Scott

Oct 07 12 11:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChanStudio - OtherSide
Posts: 5,309
Alpharetta, Georgia, US


Fotografica Gregor wrote:
The Nikon AS-15 hot shoe to PC adapter solves the lack of PC terminal on the body.

I consider the advice to buy the 1.8 versions of the 50 and 85 to be not the best really -  you do get what you pay for here, in terms of tighter tolerances and more professional build quality. 

My experience has always been that the f1.4 versions out-perform the f1.8 / f2 versions of Nikon lenses going back to pre-AI when considering a wide array of conditions.  The bokeh contrast and colour are noticeably better on the f1.4s at higher resolutions. 

And do not neglect the 35mm f1.4 -  this has always been a very desirable professional standard providing an exceptionally pleasing angle of view and perspective and is an excellent performer.  My latest fashion story for publication was shot entirely with this lens. 


The Nikon 70-300 is not nearly a professional quality lens.  Very mediocre really.

You should try the 85mm f1.8G on the D800 and then tell me if the sharpness met or exceed even the 85mm f1.4D.


  Built quality on the 85mm f1.4G and 85mm f1.8G, the 50mm f1.4G and the 50mm f1.8G are aren't much differences. Yes, the 1.4 has more glass and it is also heavier and it has a little built quality inside but not worth double or triple the price.

  Are you referring to the 35mm f1.4G?   All the new Nikkor G series are pretty awesome as compared to the D series.

Oct 07 12 01:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joey
Posts: 426
Orange, California, US


My experience with the D800E has been very positive in its exposure latitude. Underexposed, high contrast situations can be brought back to a usable image file. Reminds me of Tri-X in that respect. Image examples I've seen on the web have been all properly exposed and processed, but, experiment with the exposures for worse case scenarios and do your post work to get a usable file. This is where I've found the real strengths of the D800/D800E

Fred Greissing wrote:
I tested outy a D600 the other day.
Image quality is stellar. The 24 MP FF sensor has wonderful dynamic range and
color quality. Black and white conversions are very nice too (I'm talking about in post).

I would say that the choice should be based more on the difference in focusing systems more than anything else.

The price difference is not an issue for me, but if budget is an issue I would not be at all worried about shooting with a D600 instead of a D800 or D800E.

Image quality wise I think this says a lot:

D600 vs Hasselblad

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8031/8004893732_9aa6206ed8_h.jpg

Oct 07 12 10:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,110
Upland, California, US


R Michael Walker wrote:
I have no experience with the D600 but I've read several posts by Gary (select models) praising his D600 at high ISO (The d800 is acceptable at best at high ISO in MY opinion) and his results with the Nikkor 70-300

Hey Michael... I haven't had the chance to test the D600 with the 70-300 ED-VR as of yet.  The only lens I've had on this camera so far is the 24-120 F.4 VR Nanocoat... amazing lens and camera... here's a shot taken with this lens and camera combination at our 'dark forest' Mt. Baldy shoot... wink

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v330/GaryAbigt/Sabrina12.jpg
I plan on using the 70-300 at a shoot next weekend at the upcoming (sunset time and high ISO) Oct 13th shoot in Laguna Beach... details on the MM page... wink

Oct 07 12 11:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Paul Richard Wossidlo
Posts: 474
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:
I am moving from a Nikon D60 to a combination of either a D800 or D600 with a D7000 as a backup body.  I mostly shoot fashion and portraits.  I don't shoot studio, mostly location and shows (runway). I plan on growing my business and I need to invest in tools that will meet my needs over a period of years.  I have a SB-600 for the D7000 and I will invest in a SB-910 for the D800 or a SB-700 for the D600.  I will use a battery grip on all bodies.

If money is not an issue, I think the D800 is a better long-term investment.  Think about where you expect to be in 3 years, and where camera technology will be at that time.  Which body will still allow you to compete against other photographers with newer gear?

"Fashion and portraits" implies retouching.  At the highest professional level, isn't more megapixels preferred?

I'm not saying the D600 isn't an awesome camera and a good choice, and I'm the last person to be a megapixel whore.  But given what you say you want, the D800 seems the better choice.

Oct 08 12 03:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J M
Posts: 372
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


You said you mainly shoot runway, and only shoot raw. With the d800 you'll be chewing up externals super fast with that combo, I don't know if nikons have the small raw option like canon? If not you'll most likely have to shoot jpeg besides faster processing times for files shooting jpeg, faster buffer, and you can get them to your publisher quicker.
I know several photographers who shoot jpeg on their d800's for agency tests to save space/costs.

I know I would go crazy trying to shoot raw on a d800 at any fashion week.
Oct 08 12 03:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Select Models wrote:

Hey Michael... I haven't had the chance to test the D600 with the 70-300 ED-VR as of yet.  The only lens I've had on this camera so far is the 24-120 F.4 VR Nanocoat... amazing lens and camera... here's a shot taken with this lens and camera combination at our 'dark forest' Mt. Baldy shoot... wink

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v330/GaryAbigt/Sabrina12.jpg
I plan on using the 70-300 at a shoot next weekend at the upcoming (sunset time and high ISO) Oct 13th shoot in Laguna Beach... details on the MM page... wink

I am really looking forward to seeing the results of the D600 with the 70-300 VR.

Oct 08 12 05:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Paul Richard Wossidlo wrote:

If money is not an issue, I think the D800 is a better long-term investment.  Think about where you expect to be in 3 years, and where camera technology will be at that time.  Which body will still allow you to compete against other photographers with newer gear?

"Fashion and portraits" implies retouching.  At the highest professional level, isn't more megapixels preferred?

I'm not saying the D600 isn't an awesome camera and a good choice, and I'm the last person to be a megapixel whore.  But given what you say you want, the D800 seems the better choice.

Paul you make a good point.

Oct 08 12 05:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Jesse Mullins wrote:
You said you mainly shoot runway, and only shoot raw. With the d800 you'll be chewing up externals super fast with that combo, I don't know if nikons have the small raw option like canon? If not you'll most likely have to shoot jpeg besides faster processing times for files shooting jpeg, faster buffer, and you can get them to your publisher quicker.
I know several photographers who shoot jpeg on their d800's for agency tests to save space/costs.

I know I would go crazy trying to shoot raw on a d800 at any fashion week.

Jesse I do believe I will have to rethink a lot of aspects of my shooting coming from the D60 and going to either of my potential options.  Shooting RAW with a 10MP camera is not a big deal as far as computing requirements.  24MP or 36MP - BIG change.

I had considered shooting RAW in crop mode on either camera to reduce file size.  It isn't like I wouldn't have the same composition - just less zoom...

Now with your imput I am considering shooting runway cropped and in jpg instead of RAW - it just makes sense.  Thanks for the help.

Scott

Oct 08 12 05:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,333
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:

Jesse I do believe I will have to rethink a lot of aspects of my shooting coming from the D60 and going to either of my potential options.  Shooting RAW with a 10MP camera is not a big deal as far as computing requirements.  24MP or 36MP - BIG change.

I had considered shooting RAW in crop mode on either camera to reduce file size.  It isn't like I wouldn't have the same composition - just less zoom...

Now with your imput I am considering shooting runway cropped and in jpg instead of RAW - it just makes sense.  Thanks for the help.

Scott

I am going to second the room ( be aware of it ) issue. I had upgraded my computer and also bought 2 external 3tb hard drives when I picked up the D800, so I was already prepared for the room it was going to take up. On an 8GB C4 card, with my D80, I could shoot 637 pics as high speed as I could manage.

D800? I get roughly between 120 & 160 (depending) on that one card. The files are huge- and I had to upgrade to c10 cards because it took FOREVER (and i mean forever) to write to the slower cards.

I also did an event, and turned the sizing into jpeg fine. I nearly crashed the customers server due to all the pics and their sizes, so had to turn it down once again. REALLY be aware if you pick up the  800 for anything on the sizes, and be prepared to be frustrated at first.

Have old so-so lenses? Be aware, the d800 is going to show the quality difference. At first, it's going to be extremely frustrating.

With that said- I adore the d800. It's a fantastic camera, and it's pushed me harder as a photographer to learn. I love the AF system, the look, feel, and sharpness (even though I don't have a d800E) of it is amazing. The way it reads light vs my d80? amazing.

I can comfortably push it up to ISO 800 before the noise gets REALLY annoying.

Have you gone to the store and held a 600 or 800 in your hands yet ? The size difference (800 is bigger) is amazing. Held my D80 for the first time the other day since getting the d800, and it felt SO small

Also keep in mind, i'm a full natural light photographer. If you would like some sample shots of anything in particular do let me know and I can hunt down a few when I plug my HD in in an hour or so.

Oct 08 12 05:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


SPierce Photography wrote:

I am going to second the room ( be aware of it ) issue. I had upgraded my computer and also bought 2 external 3tb hard drives when I picked up the D800, so I was already prepared for the room it was going to take up. On an 8GB C4 card, with my D80, I could shoot 637 pics as high speed as I could manage.

D800? I get roughly between 120 & 160 (depending) on that one card. The files are huge- and I had to upgrade to c10 cards because it took FOREVER (and i mean forever) to write to the slower cards.

I also did an event, and turned the sizing into jpeg fine. I nearly crashed the customers server due to all the pics and their sizes, so had to turn it down once again. REALLY be aware if you pick up the  800 for anything on the sizes, and be prepared to be frustrated at first.

Have old so-so lenses? Be aware, the d800 is going to show the quality difference. At first, it's going to be extremely frustrating.

With that said- I adore the d800. It's a fantastic camera, and it's pushed me harder as a photographer to learn. I love the AF system, the look, feel, and sharpness (even though I don't have a d800E) of it is amazing. The way it reads light vs my d80? amazing.

I can comfortably push it up to ISO 800 before the noise gets REALLY annoying.

Have you gone to the store and held a 600 or 800 in your hands yet ? The size difference (800 is bigger) is amazing. Held my D80 for the first time the other day since getting the d800, and it felt SO small

Also keep in mind, i'm a full natural light photographer. If you would like some sample shots of anything in particular do let me know and I can hunt down a few when I plug my HD in in an hour or so.

Thanks Stephanie.  I have handled the D600 at Best Buy and it was comfortable but small in my hands.  Coming from the D60 - anything will be an improvement.  I have a gripped D7000 enroute to me as my backup body but I haven't handled it yet.  I have big hands so I know a battery grip will be mandatory for any body I choose.   I do know the D800 will be a much better fit for my hands.

As for memory cards - to start I planned on getting two each of Sandisk 32GB Extreme Pro CF (90MB/s 600x) and SDHC (95MB/s Class 10 UHS-1) cards.

With the D600 I realize I can use the same cards as my D7000.

Emailing images is something I had not considered.  It is how I usually provide my customers with images, but with my 10MP camera it hasn't been a major issue.  I see that it will become an issue quickly.  I might deliver on thumb drives from now on...

I would love to see some of your samples.  Anything you choose will be fine.

jsbfineartphoto@yahoo.com


Scott

Oct 08 12 07:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,333
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:
Thanks Stephanie.  I have handled the D600 at Best Buy and it was comfortable but small in my hands.  Coming from the D60 - anything will be an improvement.  I have a gripped D7000 enroute to me as my backup body but I haven't handled it yet.  I have big hands so I know a battery grip will be mandatory for any body I choose.   I do know the D800 will be a much better fit for my hands.

As for memory cards - to start I planned on getting two each of Sandisk 32GB Extreme Pro CF (90MB/s 600x) and SDHC (95MB/s Class 10 UHS-1) cards.

With the D600 I realize I can use the same cards as my D7000.

Emailing images is something I had not considered.  It is how I usually provide my customers with images, but with my 10MP camera it hasn't been a major issue.  I see that it will become an issue quickly.  I might deliver on thumb drives from now on...

I would love to see some of your samples.  Anything you choose will be fine.

jsbfineartphoto@yahoo.com


Scott

Alright; i'll plug in and send you an email. About 45 minutes or so, and it'll be incoming.

For RAW images and very large images- it's nearly impossible to be able to email anything from the 800 without it being resized first. If you need to send RAWS or the full sized 20x30 images, you're going to want to invest in dropbox.

I wasn't actually emailing the client the images- it was for a fair, so I was uploading them directly onto their computer. They had given me 22GB of space on the network, thinking it'd be enough. It wasn't. I ended up with a network drive all to myself lol it was their first time hiring a photographer, they didn't know what to expect!

Those cards should be fine then and not cause you any problems! Email will be coming from spiercephotography@gmail.com

Oct 08 12 07:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 3,973
Alexandria, Virginia, US


ChanStudio - OtherSide wrote:

You should try the 85mm f1.8G on the D800 and then tell me if the sharpness met or exceed even the 85mm f1.4D.


  Built quality on the 85mm f1.4G and 85mm f1.8G, the 50mm f1.4G and the 50mm f1.8G are aren't much differences. Yes, the 1.4 has more glass and it is also heavier and it has a little built quality inside but not worth double or triple the price.

  Are you referring to the 35mm f1.4G?   All the new Nikkor G series are pretty awesome as compared to the D series.

Well I'm not into MTF tables etc -  I look at what images turn out like in a variety of conditions - I look for saturation and colour,  a three dimensional feel,  textures and tonal gradations, and practical things like resistance to flare

Since 1969 I have always found the f1.4 lenses to be superior to the f1.8/2 lenses.

I've compared the 50s f1.4G and 1.8G but not the 85Gs. On bokeh alone the 85f1.4D was so vastly superior to the 85f1.8D - and this is in large degree a matter of front element size relative to focal length.  Past experience and need for a professional build quality is quite enough for me

Yes, referring to the 35f1.4G

Cheers

Oct 08 12 07:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


SPierce Photography wrote:
Alright; i'll plug in and send you an email. About 45 minutes or so, and it'll be incoming.

For RAW images and very large images- it's nearly impossible to be able to email anything from the 800 without it being resized first. If you need to send RAWS or the full sized 20x30 images, you're going to want to invest in dropbox.

I wasn't actually emailing the client the images- it was for a fair, so I was uploading them directly onto their computer. They had given me 22GB of space on the network, thinking it'd be enough. It wasn't. I ended up with a network drive all to myself lol it was their first time hiring a photographer, they didn't know what to expect!

Those cards should be fine then and not cause you any problems! Email will be coming from spiercephotography@gmail.com

Thanks again for the help.

Scott

Oct 08 12 07:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J M
Posts: 372
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


If you use both sd and cf, as in have both slots available it's worth looking into an eye fi card, if it'd be useful for your work or not, it depends on what you're shooting and your process. It sends photos across wifi. For me it's perfect, while shooting a spread I have the stylist or client/director holding my ipad, I can see details if need be, only save small jpeg or med jpeg to the sd card, while my raws to my cf, I only got the cheap 4gb as I can just delete the files off the sd card whenever.

What's even nicer is when my Ipad connects to an internet hotspot wifi, say if I go home, or for coffee it uploads all the jpegs to a private server that comes with the wifi card.

I send those as proofs, and can even choose what ones to send in a password protected link. A lot less effort and quicker, the whole process impressed my last client.

It probably wouldn't be fast enough for those heavy runway shooters though in the media room or whatever its called with their laptops.
But for $50 it suits my needs well.
Oct 08 12 08:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Christopher Hartman
Posts: 53,235
Buena Park, California, US


I haven't read through the thread yet.

Does the D600 support high speed sync with Epson flashes (Specifically, the SB-800)?

edit:from some comments, it appears it does.

Now I need to look to see if it was least has that whatever pin port for the trigger I bought for my D300.
Oct 08 12 08:19 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Jesse Mullins wrote:
If you use both sd and cf, as in have both slots available it's worth looking into an eye fi card, if it'd be useful for your work or not, it depends on what you're shooting and your process. It sends photos across wifi. For me it's perfect, while shooting a spread I have the stylist or client/director holding my ipad, I can see details if need be, only save small jpeg or med jpeg to the sd card, while my raws to my cf, I only got the cheap 4gb as I can just delete the files off the sd card whenever.

What's even nicer is when my Ipad connects to an internet hotspot wifi, say if I go home, or for coffee it uploads all the jpegs to a private server that comes with the wifi card.

I send those as proofs, and can even choose what ones to send in a password protected link. A lot less effort and quicker, the whole process impressed my last client.

It probably wouldn't be fast enough for those heavy runway shooters though in the media room or whatever its called with their laptops.
But for $50 it suits my needs well.

Pretty cool.  Thanks for the tip.

Scott

Oct 08 12 09:24 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,110
Upland, California, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:
As for memory cards - to start I planned on getting two each of Sandisk 32GB Extreme Pro CF (90MB/s 600x) and SDHC (95MB/s Class 10 UHS-1) cards.  With the D600 I realize I can use the same cards as my D7000.

THAT was another major factor that convinced me to sell my D700 and pickup the D600 (also have a D5100 that uses SD).  SD cards are much easier to find, and their prices are about 1/3 the cost of comparable CF cards... wink

Oct 08 12 10:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,333
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


Select Models wrote:

THAT was another major factor that convinced me to sell my D700 and pickup the D600 (also have a D5100 that uses SD).  SD cards are much easier to find, and their prices are about 1/3 the cost of comparable CF cards... wink

That's very true - but I love having 2 slots- one SD and one CF on the d800. It's come in handy so many times big_smile I keep an 8gb SD card in as the main, then it rolls over to a 16GB CF. I don't have to worry about switching cards as often.

Oct 08 12 11:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Select Models wrote:
THAT was another major factor that convinced me to sell my D700 and pickup the D600 (also have a D5100 that uses SD).  SD cards are much easier to find, and their prices are about 1/3 the cost of comparable CF cards... wink

It appears that the D800 requires a much bigger investment of funds that goes well beyond the initial difference in price between the D800 and D600 bodies.  It should be close to a one time investment if I pick up a handful of cards either way...

Scott

Oct 08 12 11:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DBIphotography Toronto
Posts: 3,061
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Although I skimmed sections of this thread slightly, I read it fairly closely. I saw no posts relating to what may be a bigger concern than you realize; have you considered computing-power necessary??? Compared to your D60, there is a *lot of difference in either the D600 and D800. And being fairly honest, if I were in your shoes I'd get the D600 not the 800 for lower-cost (since the D600 will be more of a "learning-tool" adjusting to FF anyhoo), as well as an array of other differences between the two formats and their places in the Nikon lineup. 24 MP is *far more than "enough" to print full-pafe images - IMHO. Research sensor-size and detail retained, and how the larger photosites of a FF sensor make a world of difference. I sell stock through my website, which I shoot both with my D90 backup (12.3 MP) and my D3 (12.1 MP). I dislike shooting full-bodies in low-light conditions with the higher-MP D90, but the D3 I resample the images to 17.35 MP roughly every time. The D600 will be a huge improvement, and by the time you've learnt how to best take advantage of the FF format we'll be blabbing about D900 vs D650 or some shit tongue

Ðanny
http://www.dbiphotography.com (Blog On Site) 
Oct 08 12 01:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Blue Rose Photos
Posts: 257
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:

I have researched the D600 heavily and I see that the interface is very similar to the D7000.  How easy is it to transfer between cameras?  Does it feel natural or do you have to think about the differences? 

Scott

It feels pretty natural

Oct 08 12 01:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Skleney
Posts: 71
Chicago, Illinois, US


Jesse Mullins wrote:
You said you mainly shoot runway, and only shoot raw. With the d800 you'll be chewing up externals super fast with that combo, I don't know if nikons have the small raw option like canon? If not you'll most likely have to shoot jpeg besides faster processing times for files shooting jpeg, faster buffer, and you can get them to your publisher quicker.
I know several photographers who shoot jpeg on their d800's for agency tests to save space/costs.

I know I would go crazy trying to shoot raw on a d800 at any fashion week.

For runway and events I like that it shoots slower than my D3s......keeps me shooting 600 frames instead of 1000  :-)  Storage keeps getting cheaper so file size isn't a big deal.
Using Capture NX2 though is a big deal........it just can't handle the file size, saving edits are sooo painfully slow it's really not possible to use it.

Oct 08 12 01:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,333
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


Jesse Mullins wrote:
You said you mainly shoot runway, and only shoot raw. With the d800 you'll be chewing up externals super fast with that combo, I don't know if nikons have the small raw option like canon? If not you'll most likely have to shoot jpeg besides faster processing times for files shooting jpeg, faster buffer, and you can get them to your publisher quicker.
I know several photographers who shoot jpeg on their d800's for agency tests to save space/costs.

I know I would go crazy trying to shoot raw on a d800 at any fashion week.

Just noticed your post- yes, it does have the large-medium-small options for RAW.

Oct 08 12 01:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Skleney
Posts: 71
Chicago, Illinois, US


SPierce Photography wrote:

Just noticed your post- yes, it does have the large-medium-small options for RAW.

I don't know about the D600, but the D800 does not have smaller raw size options.

Oct 08 12 02:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Servando Morales
Posts: 7
Dallas, Texas, US


Andrea Acailawen wrote:

Fotografica Gregor wrote:
I think Nikon knew how important this feature was to professionals and left it off on purpose to further distinguish this camera from their semi-pro line.

Same. It would be a non-factor for me, as well. I never accidentally change my settings, so I have never needed to use it.

I recently moved up from the D80 to the D600. I love the low light capability and for the budget, I made the best choice for me.
I shoot in the studio, and on location.

I have noticed that my settings get changed up on me when I am not paying attention. To be able to lock those in would have been a plus.
I am still getting used to the interface since my D80 was different.
Now that I know it happens, I will definitely watch out for it more often.

Oct 08 12 02:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


DBIphotography Toronto wrote:
Although I skimmed sections of this thread slightly, I read it fairly closely. I saw no posts relating to what may be a bigger concern than you realize; have you considered computing-power necessary??? Compared to your D60, there is a *lot of difference in either the D600 and D800. And being fairly honest, if I were in your shoes I'd get the D600 not the 800 for lower-cost (since the D600 will be more of a "learning-tool" adjusting to FF anyhoo), as well as an array of other differences between the two formats and their places in the Nikon lineup. 24 MP is *far more than "enough" to print full-pafe images - IMHO. Research sensor-size and detail retained, and how the larger photosites of a FF sensor make a world of difference. I sell stock through my website, which I shoot both with my D90 backup (12.3 MP) and my D3 (12.1 MP). I dislike shooting full-bodies in low-light conditions with the higher-MP D90, but the D3 I resample the images to 17.35 MP roughly every time. The D600 will be a huge improvement, and by the time you've learnt how to best take advantage of the FF format we'll be blabbing about D900 vs D650 or some shit tongue

Ðanny
http://www.dbiphotography.com (Blog On Site) 

Thanks Danny.  I have a duo-core Dell with 6GB RAM and 2.53Ghz processor.  I plan to buy two 2TB external drives for storage.

Scott

Oct 08 12 02:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


Michael Skleney wrote:

I don't know about the D600, but the D800 does not have smaller raw size options.

That is what I read in reviews but I haven't handled the D800 to confirm.
I know Stephanie shoots with the D800.

Scott

Oct 08 12 02:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


SMJ Photography wrote:

I recently moved up from the D80 to the D600. I love the low light capability and for the budget, I made the best choice for me.
I shoot in the studio, and on location.

I have noticed that my settings get changed up on me when I am not paying attention. To be able to lock those in would have been a plus.
I am still getting used to the interface since my D80 was different.
Now that I know it happens, I will definitely watch out for it more often.

How do you like the new body?

Scott

Oct 08 12 02:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,137
Duluth, Georgia, US


You want to get as much details as possible for fashion, products and beauty shoots. If money is the issue, rent instead. Otherwise go for D800E.
Oct 08 12 02:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 305
Frederick, Maryland, US


mshi wrote:
You want to get as much details as possible for fashion, products and beauty shoots. If money is the issue, rent instead. Otherwise go for D800E.

Makes sense.

Scott

Oct 08 12 04:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,110
Upland, California, US


JSB Fine Art Photo wrote:
I just want to thank everyone who has contributed to this thread up to this point.  You guys are a wealth of knowledge and I really appreciate both your time and your patience.

Scott

Awwwww you're welcome Scott... 1000s on this site agree with ya... borat

Oct 09 12 01:12 am  Link  Quote 
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