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Film/TV Producer
Lingerie Nights
Posts: 1
San Jose, California, US


What is the best lens for glamour photography in studio with a color background set up?
Oct 07 12 12:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JSB Fine Art Photo
Posts: 314
Frederick, Maryland, US


How big is the studio?  I am asking due to focal length concerns.
Oct 07 12 12:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leonard Gee Photography
Posts: 16,039
Sacramento, California, US


Lingerie  Nights wrote:
What is the best lens for glamour photography in studio with a color background set up?

The glass & metal ones

Oct 07 12 02:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,837
Delphos, Ohio, US


How big is your shooting space?

Crop or full-frame body?

Do you shoot for quality bokeh?

Do you ever shoot available light?

Do you shoot hand-held or with a tripod?
Oct 07 12 02:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Natural Means
Posts: 523
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Lingerie  Nights wrote:
What is the best lens for glamour photography in studio with a color background set up?

The one you have on the camera when the model looks fantastic and waiting for you to click.

Oct 07 12 03:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,204
Atlanta, Georgia, US


I think you can tell by some of the answers there is no answer, choosing the lens is often an aesthetic as well as practice choice.  It's part of being photographer.
Oct 07 12 03:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kent Art Photography
Posts: 2,650
Ashford, England, United Kingdom


75mm - 85mm.

More than 100mm and the foreshortening effect, especially with a reclining model, is noticeable.

Less than 50mm and the wideangle effect may be noticeable.

Unless you're looking for a particular effect, that is.
Oct 07 12 04:23 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Glenn Liam Kelly
Posts: 41
Sarina, Queensland, Australia


Kodak Aero on 8x10.

If we're talking 35mm 85mm seems to be a popular choice.
Oct 07 12 04:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marty McBride
Posts: 3,132
Owensboro, Kentucky, US


For me, somewhere between 14-300mm!
Oct 07 12 06:19 am  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Robb Mann
Posts: 9,990
Baltimore, Maryland, US


200 f2
Oct 07 12 06:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
HHPhoto
Posts: 855
Atlanta, Georgia, US


For portraits and figure photography, I prefer 50-85mm on a crop sensor camera.
(Approximately 85-135mm after adjustment for 1.6x factor for size of sensor.)

If I had a full frame camera body, I would use 85-135mm lenses.

My current favorite is 85mm f1.2 on a 7D.
Oct 07 12 07:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Moon Pix Photography
Posts: 3,890
Syracuse, New York, US


Leonard Gee Photography wrote:
The glass & metal ones

I agree.. However some of the best glamour lenses can be also be glass and plastic composite.

wink

Oct 07 12 07:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
LeWhite
Posts: 1,942
Los Angeles, California, US


1.5 times the diagonal of the sensor rectangle as a start, with a very open mesh fabric over the objective. Apature of from 1:.7 to 1:4.5 for larger formats
Oct 07 12 07:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ben Hinman
Posts: 596
Westwood, California, US


My studio is tiny, so i can only shoot wide angle.
50mm 1.4f is my favorite all-around lens
100mm macro for closeups

plan your lenses around your studio or your studio around your lenses. if you've got only telephoto lenses and a tiny studio, you're going to get.... well pretty much just a head in frame. and if you've only got wide angle lenses and a huge studio thats just a waste of space.

don't worry about wide angle lens distortion as long as you know how to use photoshop for optics compensation.
Oct 07 12 07:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 4,065
Alexandria, Virginia, US


"best" is a philosophical question

I can tell you that in studio (shooting editorial fashion) I find the most useful single lens to be the 24-70 f2.8 but I would not want to be without the 85f1.4 for headshots and beauty work.
Oct 07 12 07:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Leonard Gee Photography wrote:

The glass & metal ones

Yeah, I'd steer clear of the all-plastic ones if I were you.




Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano
www.stefanobrunesci.com

Oct 07 12 07:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,180
Salem, Oregon, US


it has a lot to do with working distance which will be different between crop and full-frame (for the same focal length). i use a 24-105 on full-frame much of the time in the studio although sometimes i'll use the 17-40 for those down low wide angle shots. for boudoir i'll use my 24-70 because it can go to f2.8 (vs. f4 for the 24-105).

but i've seen great glamour shoots done with a 50f1.8

i think it's good to have a variety of focal lengths and then you can experiment and see what works best for you. some prefer to use a 70-200 but if i get back too far then i have trouble communicating with the model and seeing her expression.
Oct 07 12 08:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,113
Tampa, Florida, US


Most seem to like the 50-85mm range for portraiture. 70-200mm is often used but that would be tough in a studio because of distance.

I prefer the 200-400mm range because I have horrific body odor and live in a really really long single-wide trailer.
Oct 07 12 08:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Wishard
Posts: 1,896
Fallbrook, California, US


I prefer to use a 70-200 with a full frame camera. If there is not enough space, I use a 24-105 and try to stay away from the widest part of the lens unless I am really trying to make something stand out or appear larger.
Oct 07 12 08:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Image Works Photography
Posts: 2,890
Orlando, Florida, US


Since you will be using studio lights I wouldn't be concern about lens sharpness- just about all are sharp stopped down to f/8. What comes down to is giving the model more of a flat look and the length of the studio. The studio I usually work with is not that big so my nikon 28-70mm 2.8 would do. I wouldn't hesitate on using my kit lens.
Oct 07 12 09:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jhono Bashian
Posts: 2,427
Cleveland, Ohio, US


I like my 300 f2.8 outdoors with a little fill flash bump.
Oct 07 12 09:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dd photography
Posts: 833
San Diego, California, US


Canon
Oct 07 12 09:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
the lonely photographer
Posts: 1,848
Beverly Hills, California, US


Michael Pandolfo wrote:
Most seem to like the 50-85mm range for portraiture. 70-200mm is often used but that would be tough in a studio because of distance.

I prefer the 200-400mm range because I have horrific body odor and live in a really really long single-wide trailer.

LOL  I met a couple of  photographers with really advanced cases of terminal halitosis I prefer texting them  from the next room. I wonder how the 85mm 1.2 L would look on my 7D..

Oct 07 12 10:07 am  Link  Quote 
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