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first12
Photographer
Karl Blessing
Posts: 30,853
Grand Rapids, Michigan, US


Gary Melton wrote:
I can tell you from experience - one of the things you really have to look out for with these types of shots is that they need to be shot with the camera lens pointing STRAIGHT down (or absolutely as close to perfectly straight down as you can do it).

If shot at almost any kind of an angle at all, the angle will be pretty apparent...and shot just won't look right!

Hence the benefit of a lens capable of shift (straight down, then shifted into composure).

Oct 09 12 07:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gary Melton
Posts: 6,245
Dallas, Texas, US


Gary Melton wrote:
I can tell you from experience - one of the things you really have to look out for with these types of shots is that they need to be shot with the camera lens pointing STRAIGHT down (or absolutely as close to perfectly straight down as you can do it).

If shot at almost any kind of an angle at all, the angle will be pretty apparent...and shot just won't look right!
Karl Blessing wrote:
Hence the benefit of a lens capable of shift (straight down, then shifted into composure).

Well actually what the photographer really needs is a high point to shoot from that also allows for centering the scene directly below him.  Shooting from a balcony or a ladder set up next to the scene doesn't work (because you have to shoot at an angle).  Something like an overpass or a boom is needed.

You can use a view camera, or PhotoShop in post, but it's hard to have ALL dimensions in proper perspective with either of those 2 options.

Oct 09 12 07:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Karl Blessing
Posts: 30,853
Grand Rapids, Michigan, US


Gary Melton wrote:
Well actually what the photographer really needs is a high point to shoot from that also allows for centering the scene directly below him.  Shooting from a balcony or a ladder set up next to the scene doesn't work (because you have to shoot at an angle).  Something like an overpass or a boom.

You can use a view camera, or PhotoShop in post, but it's hard to have ALL dimensions in proper perspective with either of those 2 options.

Though depending on how high up he wants to go, a ladder could suffice. I wonder how hard it would be to compose with a boom.

Oct 09 12 07:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gary Melton
Posts: 6,245
Dallas, Texas, US


Karl Blessing wrote:
Though depending on how high up he wants to go, a ladder could suffice. I wonder how hard it would be to compose with a boom.

I've tried shooting straight down from a 12 foot ladder - and it doesn't work (and let me tell you, if you've never seen/used a 12 foot step ladder - they are HUGE...go down to your local Home Depot and take a look at one - they make a more typical 6 foot step ladder look like a frickin' toy!).  The problem is, if the subject area you're shooting is of any size at all (like bigger than 4' by 4'), you have to use too much angle to keep the ladder out of the photo.

Believe me - I've tried shooting from ladders and balconies up to 16' or so...and the logistics just don't work out.  When shot with the lens at almost anything other than 90 degrees, it just doesn't look right...it just looks very amateurish (when trying to shoot something like the sample posted by the OP).

Oh, and by boom, I meant like to stand in...like a utility company cherry picker (not putting the camera on a boom).

Oct 09 12 07:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 14,731
Orlando, Florida, US


Karl Blessing wrote:
Though if you're gona shoot from high up, why not play with it a bit, ie:

http://pcdn.500px.net/15504785/3a0f8d2bc67bbb9e6389ef5d942df928878e62f9/4.jpg

I friggin love tilt-shift lens photography when it's done right.

This literally took me 8 seconds to determine that this WASN'T an elaborate macro shot of extremely detailed miniature work.

Oct 09 12 07:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Karl Blessing
Posts: 30,853
Grand Rapids, Michigan, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:
I friggin love tilt-shift lens photography when it's done right.

This literally took me 8 seconds to determine that this WASN'T an elaborate macro shot of extremely detailed miniature work.

I wish the adapter also had shift capability, but sadly it does not. It's a 50$ tilt adapter to adapt a Pentax-K lens to Micro-4/3. So that one was with my SMC Pentax-M 50/1.4 on my Olympus Pen E-P3. That exact moment you see there was aired on WZZM13 the other day as she was talking to the camera (Jennifer Lee, as the art prize people were packing up their stuff for the end of Art Prize). I was about the 6th floor up on a parking garage accross the street, shot that around f/2-2.8

But normally I like the flip the tilt around opposite so I get more in focus at lower aperture.

first 5 rows are just messing around with the adapter: http://500px.com/kbeezie

Oct 09 12 09:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
yipDog Studios
Posts: 159
Mesa, Arizona, US


A crane/jib is the way id do it. I have a Kessler 12' which gives me a horizontal arm of 8'. There are much longer arms available for rent. External monitor/shutter remote or USB tethered to laptop is the rest of the gear.
Did a cool straight down video shot from about 6' over the head of a world champion pistol shooter. Also used a remote head to slowly turn the camera as the shooter aimed quickly at different targets. I know I'm talking video but same principle would work for this shot.

Combine a jib with being on a bridge and you don't have the issues of trying to angle down to the ground.  Camera can point perfectly perpendicular to the ground. the hdmi or usb can be used for framing. Simply swing the arm out as far as needed. Much safer!
Oct 10 12 01:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JBerman Photography
Posts: 1,071
New York, New York, US


a 20+ ft extendable window washers pole and a remote (maybe a ladder)...period.
Oct 10 12 07:09 am  Link  Quote 
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