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Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > Monitors...Whats the best??? Search   Reply
Photographer
Jeff Michaels Photos
Posts: 248
Hershey, Pennsylvania, US


Question... I'm looking to see what people use and opinions on which are the best if i'm in the market to purchase one.  I have a relative who made the statement to me that any photographer who's a professional or takes his work seriously uses Apple products to edit their work. He feels there isn't a monitor on the market that has Apples clarity and true image quality. I think there are a couple monitors that are just as equal and better. Asus and Samsung are 2 of my choices....  Any opinions or thoughts???
Nov 11 12 07:19 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Zorka
Posts: 191
Belgrade, Central Serbia, Serbia


When it comes to PROFESSIONAL monitors there are only two brands: Eizo & NEC. Everything else (including Apple) is faaaaaaar below those two.
Nov 11 12 07:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,231
Duluth, Georgia, US


You want to consider at least 10-bit monitor that is capable of displaying 1 billion colors. For the money, I prefer this one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/7 … n_LCD.html

If money is not an issue, consider this one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/8 … creen.html

If you just do retouching for screen only, any 6-bit laptop LCD, such as Apple's MacbookPro or any Dell laptop, is good for that purpose.
Nov 11 12 07:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Light and Lens Studio
Posts: 1,267
Sisters, Oregon, US


Apple consistently uses monitors that are a cut or two above the common herd. I do know that Samsung also makes high resolution monitors and Samsung has put out quality products in my experience.  But their "Low End" monitors are no better than those which come bundled with mass produced inexpensive systems.

When you are looking at monitors be sure you look at all the specs. Basically, you will get what you pay for.

As to the comment about serious photographers only using Apple products. Bear in mind that the industry standard post production software is published by Adobe, not Apple.

My 2c worth.
Nov 11 12 07:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
fotopfw
Posts: 786
Kerkrade, Limburg, Netherlands


Eizo CG245, 98% RGB 1:850 contrast, professional monitors always have this low contrast. NEC, Lacie, all offer 1:850 - 1:1000 contrast.

Samsung, ASUS, HP etc... advertise with their super high contrast, but that's not what you need for retouching.
Nov 11 12 07:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Neil Snape
Posts: 9,452
Paris, Île-de-France, France


There are others like Quato, and certain HP, like the 2480 zx. In fact the HP I have has the highest gamut of any edit monitor ever made. Too much so.

Yet for the most part NEC for the price and quality are hard to beat.
Nov 11 12 07:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Light and Lens Studio
Posts: 1,267
Sisters, Oregon, US


Also, bear in mind that 99.9% of those who view digital formatted images are viewing a relatively low resolution version and viewing it on relatively low end monitors.

smile
Nov 11 12 07:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


Zorka wrote:
When it comes to PROFESSIONAL monitors there are only two brands: Eizo & NEC. Everything else (including Apple) is faaaaaaar below those two.

Just silly. Eizo is the brand that people recommend when they really don't know so they go with name recognition.

Eizo doesn't manufacture their panels. I believe their panels are manufactured by Samsung (at least some are) so you're just paying for the name and can get the same panel in a much more reasonably-priced monitor.

Here's an excellent resource.

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?threa … ost7663105

Edit: just for an example, the panel used in the NEC Multisync p221w-bk is the same as the one housed in the Eizo and the NEC is 1/3 of the price. The Eizo ColorEdge CG222W uses either an S-IPS panel or a Samsung S-PVA panel (can't remember which) but you can get that same panel in other monitors, Samsung or NEC and others, for MUCH less.

Don't just go with the name. Research the panel behind it.

Nov 11 12 07:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,231
Duluth, Georgia, US


I don't know for sure but I've heard Apple doesn't support 10-bit display color depth.
Nov 11 12 07:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jeff Michaels Photos
Posts: 248
Hershey, Pennsylvania, US


From my point of view im just looking for a good monitor for editing... I dont need to see the base of hair follicles when I zoom in on a pic... My cousin is talking picture quality over all (I think) While I have an open mind on comparing products I also dont think Apple is the be all end all...
Nov 11 12 08:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


Jeff Michaels Photos wrote:
From my point of view im just looking for a good monitor for editing... I dont need to see the base of hair follicles when I zoom in on a pic... My cousin is talking picture quality over all (I think) While I have an open mind on comparing products I also dont think Apple is the be all end all...

Whatever monitor you choose also be sure to get a calibration system or it renders the quality of the monitor moot. If the colors are off it doesn't matter how good the monitor is.

Nov 11 12 08:05 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
ST Retouch
Posts: 314
Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland


I work with Eizo and Dell monitors.
If you compare price and quality without a doubt Dell U3011 2560X1600 .
Outstanding quality and colors , professionally calibrated from factory , I bought several monitors for my retouchers , they work perfect.
Highly recommended .
Best Regards!
Nov 11 12 08:19 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Neil Snape
Posts: 9,452
Paris, Île-de-France, France


mshi wrote:
I don't know for sure but I've heard Apple doesn't support 10-bit display color depth.

They do with the Mac Pro and Display port. The limitation is there, over DVI Apple is not going to work.

Yet where they got with the drivers I can't say as I stopped doing prototype testing on displays years ago.

For the above post, Eizo have a lot of custom electronics to control colour deviation, so it's not just the display panel but other things too. Right of course on the panels, they are all outsourced.

Nov 11 12 08:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


Neil Snape wrote:
For the above post, Eizo have a lot of custom electronics to control colour deviation, so it's not just the display panel but other things too. Right of course on the panels, they are all outsourced.

Good point. There are other features to consider other than just the panel.

Nov 11 12 08:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hertsphoto
Posts: 3
Bedford, England, United Kingdom


Michael Pandolfo wrote:

Just silly. Eizo is the brand that people recommend when they really don't know so they go with name recognition.

Eizo doesn't manufacture their panels. I believe their panels are manufactured by Samsung (at least some are) so you're just paying for the name and can get the same panel in a much more reasonably-priced monitor.

Here's an excellent resource.

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?threa … ost7663105

Edit: just for an example, the panel used in the NEC Multisync p221w-bk is the same as the one housed in the Eizo and the NEC is 1/3 of the price. The Eizo ColorEdge CG222W uses either an S-IPS panel or a Samsung S-PVA panel (can't remember which) but you can get that same panel in other monitors, Samsung or NEC and others, for MUCH less.

Don't just go with the name. Research the panel behind it.

While I agree with some/most of what you say I wanted to point out that there is more to the quality of a screen than who manufactures the panel. The fact that Samsung may manufacture an Eizo panel doesn't mean the performance of the display will be the same. There are tweaks/ customisations that happen alongside different acceptance cirteria for the panels whioch means on average you would probably expect a higher performance from an Eizo than a Samsung (but don't get me wrong Samsungs can be very good). The key sentence though is the Research the specific screen - some Eizos are superb, some less so. Same with NEC...

Whether you could tell the difference and whether it is worth the extra money is a trade off only you can make. I do know that every photographer I know that has spent time with a decent screen wouldn't 'go back'.

There are also differences between different ranges within brands - for example the spectraview displays from NEC go through a more rigorous selection process than the multisync ones, but are the 'same' panels. Not all panels come out of the factory the same.

For me, there wasn't enough difference between the multisync and spectraview displays from NEC for me to justify getting a spectraview (in the UK the spectras don't come with a puck - its purely the selection process and a 20-30% difference in price...). I did get a multisyn though and love the way it performs.

The most important thing is to get your head round calibrating the screen and making the best out of what you get.

R.

Nov 11 12 10:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sclesky Art Nudes
Posts: 58
Kansas City, Missouri, US


I use the NEC Multisync P221W. I purchased it with the calibrator through B&H. Very happy with the results and the price is very reasonable.
Nov 11 12 10:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
eos3_300
Posts: 1,458
Brooklyn, New York, US


Sclesky Art Nudes wrote:
I use the NEC Multisync P221W. I purchased it with the calibrator through B&H. Very happy with the results and the price is very reasonable.

Same here
Best bang for buck and probably better than Apple screen that costs 3x as much

Nov 11 12 10:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,231
Duluth, Georgia, US


Neil Snape wrote:

They do with the Mac Pro and Display port. The limitation is there, over DVI Apple is not going to work.

Yet where they got with the drivers I can't say as I stopped doing prototype testing on displays years ago.

For the above post, Eizo have a lot of custom electronics to control colour deviation, so it's not just the display panel but other things too. Right of course on the panels, they are all outsourced.

I've heard it's the Apple OS that doesn't support 10-bit color depth.

Nov 11 12 12:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Pictus
Posts: 980
Teresópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


Check:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/40306131
http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?threa … st17626143

If money is not a problem, Quato Intelli Proof Excellence, Eizo CG or NEC PA

BTW, OSX does not support 10-bit output http://www.imagescience.com.au/kb/quest … ut+Support
Nov 11 12 01:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Shine Retouching
Posts: 194
Chicago, Illinois, US


I use the NEC PA271W and love it. One of the problems with the Apple monitors is that they are all glossy. I don't think Apple is geared toward professionals. I had the older brand  and since It had a small spot on on my screen they upgraded me to a refurbished PA271W and it is awesome. NEC does sell refurbished monitors for a little cheaper so check that out. But if you have the cash to buy new...I would buy new.
Nov 11 12 02:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Retouch007
Posts: 403
East Newark, New Jersey, US


EIZO industry standard.
Nov 11 12 03:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Krunoslav Stifter
Posts: 3,847
Santa Cruz, California, US


Jeff Michaels Photos wrote:
Question... I'm looking to see what people use and opinions on which are the best if i'm in the market to purchase one.  I have a relative who made the statement to me that any photographer who's a professional or takes his work seriously uses Apple products to edit their work. He feels there isn't a monitor on the market that has Apples clarity and true image quality. I think there are a couple monitors that are just as equal and better. Asus and Samsung are 2 of my choices....  Any opinions or thoughts???

...I would be very careful of following his advice. That statement shows how subjective and narrow-minded point of view a person has.

What's the best monitor, it depends on the context. What constitutes best and for who? What kind of work do you intend to do on your monitor etc. Spending 1000 + dollars on a monitor without those questions answered makes little sense to me. If you have money to spend and you are board than any of the mentioned monitors will be fine, however if you are looking to make a business decision, there are other things to consider or it simply isn't good business. Monitor is ultimately a tool, just like a camera is of Photoshop is. Buying a bigger more expensive monitor won't make you any better photographer/retoucher by default, regardless of what logo it has. And if you fail in color management than it's a rather expensive toy to use for displaying bright colors. Don't get me wrong, if you know your stuff and are looking to improve your tool set than high end pro grade monitors as some mentioned here might be just the thing you are looking for. And there are some good posts here, but it also means that you know how to take an advantage of what you bought.

So I'm simply wandering what is the nature of the need to buy a new monitor? If you are looking to see what others are using than what you will most likely to find is a bunch of contradicting information, misleading information and downright wrong information. The good gems that are often berried underneath it all and require a keen eye and lot of digging. So best thing to do is to set a criteria for buying one before you start listening to everyone's opinion including mine.

I'm no expert on monitors but the reason why I wrote the above is because I have been researching other controversial topics online and like I said the lesson I learned is simple. The good gems that are often berried underneath it all and require a keen eye and lot of digging, so define as much as you can in advance so you have some criteria to look for. Discard whatever makes no senses to you and focus more on what does. Look for patterns. If ten people say the same thing it may not be the truth, but if ten people from different sources tell the same thing than chances are they are not simply copying what others have said but have an opinion of their own. Once you have spot the pattern look for evidence of it and try to confirm it. That is the best kind of research you can do if you are investing the time to do it already.

P.S.
If you don't care and simply want to part ways with your cash as soon as possible to watch bright colors than disregard my entire post. smile

Just my 2 cents.
Cheers.

Nov 11 12 10:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Neil Snape
Posts: 9,452
Paris, Île-de-France, France


mshi wrote:

I've heard it's the Apple OS that doesn't support 10-bit color depth.

You're right, the cards and display port do support it yet the drivers were never correctly developed. According to Chris Cox 10 bit frame buffers are made yet the OS returns errors.

When I did testing on the 10 bit workflow both PC and Mac, it was for creating precise LUTs for the displays with high bit correction. The engineers seemed to get it working for CLUTs but since I had no Display Port, nor a mini>display port adapter I didn't complete that part of it.

Apple decided about 4 or more years ago to abandon the high end users in favour of iDevices, and portables for general public.

Too bad really as the hardware is fully capable but crippled by lack of driver support. All this and they still charge more for the same video cards on PCs.

Nov 11 12 11:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jeff Michaels Photos
Posts: 248
Hershey, Pennsylvania, US


Thanx for all the input... I myself am just looking for a solid monitor for editing. While I have looked at all the llamas mentioned there are 2 ASUS monitors that fit perfectly.  In the end I think my cousin was basically saying he has yet to physically see another monitor that has the same quality and clarity as an Apple screen does. As for the statement about using Apple products to edit etc. etc.  All the posts about the tools you use are correct and with the software being made by adobe etc. etc. I think again he may be looking at it from an opinion of Apple being a better quality product. My view is as long as you/the client is happy it really doesn't matter what you use to a point.
Nov 12 12 04:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Nemeth
Posts: 27,201
Dearborn, Michigan, US


I have a LG 23 inch IPS monitor.
Nov 12 12 04:22 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Agnese Lupike
Posts: 138
Chesterfield, England, United Kingdom


Until today i worked on a asus monitor as old as the earth itself lol big_smile, but since it started to flicker, i will get the  DELL U2713HM 27 and hope we be good buddies big_smile for a while.

P.S. with that i wanted to say, its not really about the monitor, but about your skill.
Nov 12 12 06:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Extrosy
Posts: 656
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


And of course, make sure you can rotate it to portrait
Nov 12 12 09:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jose Deida
Posts: 1,139
BLANDON, Pennsylvania, US


Get the whole truth (well atleast 98% of it :)with a NEC MultiSync PA241W-BK-SV and the built in KVM switch rocks smile
Nov 12 12 11:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J Allen Photographic
Posts: 207
Reno, Nevada, US


I use the ASUS PA246 and absolutely love it. Good IPS panel that didn't break the bank.
Nov 13 12 10:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
xbe photographer
Posts: 167
Kaišiadorys, Kauno, Lithuania


I think the best monitor is calibrated monitor:D
try Nec or Eizo
Nov 13 12 11:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,591
Upland, California, US


Gotta 27 inch Vizio LCD that I bought at the camera swapmeet for $130... freakin deal of the century and amazing image clarity... borat
Nov 13 12 11:11 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joan Morgades
Posts: 311
Reus, Catalonia, Spain


Another happy Nec user here.
Nov 14 12 07:51 am  Link  Quote 
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