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Photographer
Robin Saini Photography
Posts: 135
Pune, Maharashtra, India


Hi,

Planning to buy Monitor  calibration tool but confused with so many products..

Found good reviews of below product
X-Rite ColorMunki Smile CMUNSML
http://www.amazon.com/X-Rite-CMUNSML-Co … le+CMUNSML


Can someoen suggest how good is this product or is any other product better

rds
www.Facebook.com/RobinSainiPhotography
Nov 11 12 11:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan Brady
Posts: 605
Perth, Western Australia, Australia


RobinSaini wrote:
Hi,

Planning to buy Monitor  calibration tool but confused with so many products..

Found good reviews of below product
X-Rite ColorMunki Smile CMUNSML
http://www.amazon.com/X-Rite-CMUNSML-Co … le+CMUNSML


Can someoen suggest how good is this product or is any other product better

rds
www.Facebook.com/RobinSainiPhotography

This is what I use.

http://spyder.datacolor.com/portfolio-view/spyder4pro/

Have a profile running on each of my monitors. easy to setup and run.

Nov 12 12 12:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
photoimager
Posts: 4,875
Stoke-on-Trent, England, United Kingdom


What is the monitor ?
How close to perfection do you or your clients need ?

The best performing and most accurate models cost a lot of money and most people do not work within the tolerances that means they are required.

Some will profile printers as well as monitors / projectors.

Some will create camera profiles.

OP, you will generally get what you pay for. More money will mean more colour swatches used at a faster speed and with greater accuracy. Colourmunki's are fine.
Nov 12 12 12:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cuervo79
Posts: 1,059
Guatemala, Guatemala, Guatemala


Just in regard to brand, does xrite still support their old calibration hardware? cause datacolor (the ones that make the spyder) don't support them on new systems, to me that is a very important feature since I still have my spyder2pro and the software does not work in windows 7, yes its old but why buy a new one when the old one still works?
Nov 12 12 12:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Neil Snape
Posts: 9,457
Paris, Île-de-France, France


X-Rite too, when moving the majority forward to the smae base as i1 Profiler dropped all support for older software. Yet much of the old hardware still works with the new software.
Nov 12 12 12:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
photoimager
Posts: 4,875
Stoke-on-Trent, England, United Kingdom


Cuervo79 wrote:
I still have my spyder2pro and the software does not work in windows 7, yes its old but why buy a new one when the old one still works?

I've used a Spyder2 successfully on a 64bit Win7 machine, you just need to download the driver update from their site.

Nov 12 12 12:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Don Olson Imagery
Posts: 291
Eugene, Oregon, US


xrite ColorMunki Photo.
Nov 12 12 12:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
imcFOTO
Posts: 579
Bothell, Washington, US


I used a Spyder 2 before - recently upgraded to Spyder 4. It's a chore but it works and has kept my two LCD monitors in sync and stable. It has a useful feature (if you choose to turn it on) which continuously monitors ambient light during normal monitor use and adjusts brightness to try and keep your view consistent even in varying room light (e.g. day or night).
Nov 12 12 10:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Jewett
Posts: 2,448
al-Marsā, Tunis, Tunisia


BasicColor software from Germany is the best, with the best puck you can afford.

http://www.basiccolor.de/en/
Nov 13 12 12:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cuervo79
Posts: 1,059
Guatemala, Guatemala, Guatemala


photoimager wrote:

I've used a Spyder2 successfully on a 64bit Win7 machine, you just need to download the driver update from their site.

supposedly I have the last version for the spider2 2.3 if I'm not mistaken you can make the profile but its wonky to make windows7 actually use it...

Nov 13 12 01:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Andrew Somers
Posts: 1,032
Los Angeles, California, US


BasICColor is undoubtedly the best, followed by XRite. Spyder sucks.

I use the XRite i1 EODis Display Pro

http://www.amazon.com/Xrite-EODIS3-i1Di … isplay+pro

With the BasICColor Display software:

http://www2.chromix.com/colorgear/shop/ … yKS37A0E2F
Nov 13 12 11:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rich Arnold Photography
Posts: 940
Los Angeles, California, US


color munki. does the job and calibrates to my printer as well.
Nov 13 12 09:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wilde One
Posts: 2,359
Santa Monica, California, US


BasicColor is very good software, and they will give you a list of compatible pucks.

If you have a NEC display, use their solution (which is actually using BasicColor software, tweaked for NEC displays).
Nov 13 12 11:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


For a guy who doesn't have $1000 for a calibration system, can we agree that the i1Display Pro  is a decent tool to calibrate dual monitors?
Dec 06 12 07:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,361
Salem, Oregon, US


we use colormunki and get good results from our print lab
Dec 06 12 07:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Andrew Somers
Posts: 1,032
Los Angeles, California, US


dupe
Dec 06 12 08:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Paul AI
Posts: 1,046
Shawnee, Oklahoma, US


I don't know about the best, but I have used the Spyder Pro with good results.  It's been a real asset when soft-proofing images.
Dec 06 12 08:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rich Arnold Photography
Posts: 940
Los Angeles, California, US


delete
Dec 06 12 08:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Æmagine
Posts: 6,096
Biloxi, Mississippi, US


Aaron Lewis Photography wrote:
For a guy who doesn't have $1000 for a calibration system, can we agree that the i1Display Pro  is a decent tool to calibrate dual monitors?

Read the fine print...  Only one of your two monitors will be used as the calibrated master for many systems.

I use the i1.

I had the spyder2Pro, but was getting inconsistent calibration with a pink cast.  Their support was good though.

Dec 06 12 09:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AM Photography
Posts: 697
Independence, Oregon, US


I just picked up the basic Spyder4, does what I need it to. If all your really worried about is making sure your monitor is calibrated then this is a great option, and fairly inexpensive too.
Dec 06 12 10:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Veit Photo
Posts: 667
London, England, United Kingdom


I got a Spyde3 Pro on sale and it was quite affordable - under $100 equivalent.
At first it would only load colour profiles for one monitor and their service folk blamed Windows for this (this is the hallmark of true professionalism in the IT industry). The new software can cope with this.
It's a good package for me and the true test is whether it can calibrate a pair of different monitors to the same settings, so a photo dragged from one to the other still looks the same. Getting consistent colours from screen to print though....
n i g h t m a r e!


Colour calibration is a dark art, though, as far as I'm concerned.
For example the S3 takes an ambient light reading which *I think* takes a colour reading. That means if I calibrate in the morning with daylight I get a different profile that I would in the evening with artificial light. By extension then I should have different profiles for different times of day? Just shoot me...
Dec 07 12 02:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
liddellphoto
Posts: 1,801
London, England, United Kingdom


I have recently been in the market for a new one and settled on the i1Display Pro, the only weakness seems to be measuing very low values due to the tech which is more of an issue for measuring contrast ratios rather than calibrating. A big problem is variation between units which was a problem for Eye One Display 2 (and is for other units).

Also check you get one that can handle a wide gamut screen if you use one, my old xrite monaco xr was highly regarded for normal gamut screens but cannot do wide gamut.
Dec 07 12 05:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
California Girls Skate
Posts: 343
Los Angeles, California, US


RobinSaini wrote:
best Monitor calibration tool ?

You don't need one.

Set up your monitor however you like, then you do a test-print to the facility which is printing your materials.

When you get the print back, adjust your monitor to match the print and save a calibration profile for it.

I used to work at a professional commercial lab which did traditional and digital printing. Most lab folks will tell you, this is the best way to do it. Remember, calibration tools only adjust your monitor to what it SHOULD be. That doesn't mean it will match what the lab is outputting. The lab might be misadjusted too. Thus, calibrating by eye using a test print is the most accurate way to get things looking exactly the way you expect.

Dec 07 12 05:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ArtisticGlamour
Posts: 3,846
Phoenix, Arizona, US


California Girls Skate wrote:
Set up your monitor however you like, then you do a test-print to the facility which is printing your materials.

When you get the print back, adjust your monitor to match the print and save a calibration profile for it.

Good idea if I was only printing to one printer. But, I do very little printing and do much more output for Facebook, Mayhem, Competition Projectors, and DVD Slide shows.

So, how do I calibrate my own monitor so that my final images are calibrated to the typical "off the shelf" Monitor, Projector, or IPad/Cellphone screen!? wink LOL!

In other words I want my final images on my own monitor...to be calibrated to the "average viewer's monitor" (typical, uncalibrated, "off the shelf" LCD), or DVD slideshow on their big screen TV! So, whoever I provide them to sees VERY CLOSE to the same final image I do on my own monitor.

Dec 07 12 06:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
S W I N S K E Y
Posts: 24,315
Saint Petersburg, Florida, US


i have the data color spyder 3 pro, the four computers screens in the house (one  desktop and three laptops) all look alike and just like the prints...i think i spent about $200 for it...

http://i.imgur.com/m8TQi.png
Dec 07 12 06:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
S W I N S K E Y
Posts: 24,315
Saint Petersburg, Florida, US


Cuervo79 wrote:
Just in regard to brand, does xrite still support their old calibration hardware? cause datacolor (the ones that make the spyder) don't support them on new systems, to me that is a very important feature since I still have my spyder2pro and the software does not work in windows 7, yes its old but why buy a new one when the old one still works?

there are third party calibration programs that can use your spectrometer..

http://i.imgur.com/m8TQi.png

Dec 07 12 06:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


California Girls Skate wrote:

You don't need one.

Set up your monitor however you like, then you do a test-print to the facility which is printing your materials.

When you get the print back, adjust your monitor to match the print and save a calibration profile for it.

I used to work at a professional commercial lab which did traditional and digital printing. Most lab folks will tell you, this is the best way to do it. Remember, calibration tools only adjust your monitor to what it SHOULD be. That doesn't mean it will match what the lab is outputting. The lab might be misadjusted too. Thus, calibrating by eye using a test print is the most accurate way to get things looking exactly the way you expect.

That works, however, everyone's eye is different and I would suspect a lot less sensitive or accurate to the digital eye of a calibration tool, especially in a multi monitor setup

Dec 07 12 07:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


Æmagine wrote:

Read the fine print...  Only one of your two monitors will be used as the calibrated master for many systems.

I use the i1.

I had the spyder2Pro, but was getting inconsistent calibration with a pink cast.  Their support was good though.

That was my result with the Spyder as well. I had borrowed one a while back and that's about what I got out of it. Hence me asking this question.

So how does that work in a multi monitor setup? Is this the wrong tool or is there a method to get the monitors the same.

Dec 07 12 07:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
liddellphoto
Posts: 1,801
London, England, United Kingdom


California Girls Skate wrote:
I used to work at a professional commercial lab which did traditional and digital printing. Most lab folks will tell you, this is the best way to do it. Remember, calibration tools only adjust your monitor to what it SHOULD be. That doesn't mean it will match what the lab is outputting. The lab might be misadjusted too. Thus, calibrating by eye using a test print is the most accurate way to get things looking exactly the way you expect.

Any decent lab is going to have a fully ICC managed workflow all of which is way more accurate that anyone's eyes

Dec 07 12 09:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Extrosy
Posts: 656
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


whats is the best method for web presentation?
Dec 07 12 01:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Veit Photo
Posts: 667
London, England, United Kingdom


Extrosy wrote:
whats is the best method for web presentation?

Every uncalibrated monitor gives a slightly different colour balance so there's not much you can do.
Images from a calibrated monitor will show in their proper colours on other calibrated monitors, so theoretically the people who matter will see the correct colours. All too often clients do not have calibrated monitors.

Something that's often pointed out as a key part of the workflow for web is to render images to sRGB. If you render to ProPhotoRGB the colours of your images will go crazy on many websites.

Even if you use a calibrated monitor, different software renders JPGs with slightly different colours. At least I've found this. In Windows 7 the algorithm that renders thumbnail previews gives has a slightly different gamut from the Image Viewer app, which is different again from Lightroom.

I would contend that if you spend too much time dabbling in colour you will go mad. Just look at Dan Marguilis...

Dec 07 12 01:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robin Saini Photography
Posts: 135
Pune, Maharashtra, India


California Girls Skate wrote:

I DID THAT , GOT AN TEST CALIBRATED PRINT OUT FORM LAB AND THEN OPENED SAME FILE ON IN PS AND MATCHED THE COLOR ACCURATELY AND REALIZED HOW BAD MY DELL 2410
(http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/prod … u=320-8277) WAS OFF CALIBRATED, BUT DUIRNG THE PERIOD OF CALIBRATION  TO MATCH PRINT QUALITY, MY MONOTOR CONTRACT AND BRIGHTNESS LEVEL WAS SET TO 7 AND 12 AND ALL OTHER SRGB COLORS WERE PUT ON A LOW VALUE...SO

NOW I FEEL I AM WORKING ON A SUCH A DARK MONITOR AND THE ENTIRE CHARM OF BRIGH AND VIVID COLORS GONE...

GUESS DOING MANUAL CALIBRATION HAS TAKEN A LOAD, OR AM I DOING SOMETHING WORNG?

You don't need one.

Set up your monitor however you like, then you do a test-print to the facility which is printing your materials.

When you get the print back, adjust your monitor to match the print and save a calibration profile for it.

I used to work at a professional commercial lab which did traditional and digital printing. Most lab folks will tell you, this is the best way to do it. Remember, calibration tools only adjust your monitor to what it SHOULD be. That doesn't mean it will match what the lab is outputting. The lab might be misadjusted too. Thus, calibrating by eye using a test print is the most accurate way to get things looking exactly the way you expect.

Mar 23 13 12:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,361
Salem, Oregon, US


i read a book on color management, color profiles and at the end said "f*ck it" lol

now i'm an sRGB kind of guy.

and i really like my colormunki although i don't turn the brightness down as much as it recommends. there seems to be this struggle between having the monitor right for print and right for usability. not to mention that each lab comes out differently, even with the same file.

Veit Photo wrote:
I would contend that if you spend too much time dabbling in colour you will go mad. Just look at Dan Marguilis...

Mar 23 13 12:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SayCheeZ!
Posts: 17,864
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Cuervo79 wrote:
to me that is a very important feature since I still have my spyder2pro and the software does not work in windows 7...

mine does

Mar 23 13 12:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SayCheeZ!
Posts: 17,864
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Aaron Lewis Photography wrote:
That was my result with the Spyder as well. I had borrowed one a while back and that's about what I got out of it. Hence me asking this question.

So how does that work in a multi monitor setup? Is this the wrong tool or is there a method to get the monitors the same.

It depends on the Spyder model that you get... or at least the software that comes with it.  Tne most basic (lowest cost) version only works with one monitor.

I just met with the Datacolor rep at WPPI a couple of weeks ago and he showed me one that's available for @ $149-179 that corrects multiple monitors, your tablets, and smart phones.  It's the Spyder 4, but I don't remember which version it's called.

Mar 23 13 12:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Creative Concept Studio
Posts: 2,547
Fort Worth, Texas, US


Spyder3Elite v4 here for multiple monitors on Windows 8 x64. Works well.

The software allows calibration of my printers too but I've not done that bit yet.

Ray
Mar 23 13 12:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Barry Kidd Photography
Posts: 2,410
Red Lion, Pennsylvania, US


Cuervo79 wrote:
Just in regard to brand, does xrite still support their old calibration hardware? cause datacolor (the ones that make the spyder) don't support them on new systems, to me that is a very important feature since I still have my spyder2pro and the software does not work in windows 7, yes its old but why buy a new one when the old one still works?

I still have the spyder 2 pro as well and it works fine on both windows 7 and windows 8.

Mar 23 13 01:29 pm  Link  Quote 
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