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Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,082
Catskill, New York, US


Also note that many of the Wordpress Template / Themes are NOT supported by IE.
Nov 14 12 08:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AM Photography
Posts: 697
Independence, Oregon, US


Ok, after some searching I think that I have found the service that you need. Checkout http://www.pagelines.com/ It is, from what I can tell, the closest to a true wysiwyg wordpress theme system out there. PLUS, all the themes you create are responsive right out of the gate(which I know you were looking for)

Checkout the Demo here, http://www.pagelines.com/tour/, and you can get a better idea of if this is what your looking for.

The one catch is that it costs $139 for the system, BUT there is also professional support and help avenues through the site that should make it very simple for you to get going. $139 seems like a lot for a wordpress theme, but its better than thousands for a professionally designed theme. Also, I have personally bought and edited maybe 2-300$ worth of Wordpress themes over the last few years - I like to change things up a lot. So $139 one time, is not all that bad. Especially since you could use change the design whenever you like using this system.
Nov 14 12 11:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ally Moy
Posts: 404
Morris Plains, New Jersey, US


William Kious wrote:
This... right here.

I have better things to do with my time than attempt to debug something that was advertised as "simple". big_smile

Well, that's why you have to pick your theme and plugins wisely if you stick with Wordpress. Reviews and live demos will tell you a lot.

Anything pre-made is not going to fit your exact vision out of the box. Out of the box 'should be' 100% be functional though...but you can't expect anything from a free user-developed theme/plugin. Pick one with support and made by a trusted developer/designer.

Maybe you could find a service with an easier control panel for you but if you want something EXACTLY as you envision it you need to hire a designer/developer then. This goes for any platform you pick.

Generally the easiest to use platforms offer next to no customization. That's where wordpress shines. The dashboard has everything spelled out in plain terms for basic things like putting a new picture up, but if you really want to you can do anything to customize it.

Nov 14 12 05:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GoldRoseMedia
Posts: 2,937
NORTH BRUNSWICK, New Jersey, US


Christopher Trento wrote:
This is the problem/misconception, there's a HUGE amount of Worpress promotion out there about how easy it is to use. If you're a sheep and want to follow and have a cookie cutter site that looks like every blog, then you're golden. If you're a photographer, landscaper, small store owner or anyone that doesn't know about any sort of code writing, you need a WYSIWYG. Otherwise, people could just as well stick with using programs like Dreamweaver.

You are not wrong. I am a programmer myself, and WordPress is easy for me, but I can definitely understand how someone with no background in programming would find it difficult. I posted something about this very issue on my blog a while back. I will repost it here, in case you find it of value:

The reality that everyone who uses open source software must face is this: Open source software is written by programmers, for programmers, and the people who benefit the most from open source are those who can read and understand the code for themselves. The programmers who create the tools do it because they love technology, and in the vast majority of cases they receive no compensation for their efforts apart from the personal satisfaction of having created something “cool”. Technical writing and customer support are entirely different skill sets from programming, and it is not surprising to me that many programmers either do them poorly, or choose not to do them at all.

Frankly, I think WordPress and other open source projects do themselves a disservice by constantly proclaiming that their software is easy to install, easy to use, etc. which creates a false expectation among non-technical users. If all you want to do is install WordPress in its basic configuration, and use a pre-built theme from the theme directory, then yes, it is fairly easy. However as soon as you start trying to customize things, you will find that there is no way to do it without editing the code, and at that point you must either learn programming yourself, or you must hire a programmer to do it for you. Given the way WordPress is architected, I really don’t see that ever changing.

Nov 14 12 05:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Vanessa Collins
Posts: 3
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada


Oh, I'm dealing with the very same problem right now! smile
The photographer I constantly work with, suggested me to try EspressoWork portfolio service (it also lets you setup a website), so I'm going to try it, since Wordpress is not so easy to setup and manage myself.
Nov 23 12 06:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Andrew Thomas Evans
Posts: 24,078
Toulon, Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur, France


GoldRoseMedia wrote:
You are not wrong. I am a programmer myself, and WordPress is easy for me, but I can definitely understand how someone with no background in programming would find it difficult. I posted something about this very issue on my blog a while back. I will repost it here, in case you find it of value:

+1 (and your blog post)

Also what I've seen is that people jump into wordpress or other types of sites not because it can really benefit them, but because they are thinking it's the future and want to get on board. I really, personally, don't see a reason for a wordpress style site if there isn't a lot of content being generated (blog or products posted) or a big need to get eCommerce integrated seamlessly in the site. If all a person is doing is a few galleries, blog (that can be ran elsewhere), and a contact page, then wordpress may not be for them.


IMO


Andrew Thomas Evans
www.andrewthomasevans.com

Nov 23 12 07:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Andrea Acailawen
Posts: 948
Tampa, Florida, US


The reason so many themes have a similar feel, at least in some regards, is that there are a dozen or so core frameworks upon which countless themes are built (like Gantry and Genesis, for example). They are basically offer starting point that make it easier for theme developers to quickly build themes for Wordpress, Joomla and Drupal. When you have a dozen frequently used frameworks, many designs will feel a bit familiar after a while.

That said, I think a distinction needs to be made here. The Wordpress back-end is fairly easy to learn and with a decent theme you can get a site up and running fairly quickly so that it is operational. From that standpoint, Wordpress is easy to use. It is easy to upload images and create daily content (posts) for the front end without much effort. That is not the same as saying that Wordpress theme development is easy. On the contrary. Themes are like cookie cutters, with a few easy to make base customizations here and there, but everyone who buys the same theme starts with the same site and gets the same options for how the site will generally look and function. The more you want to customize it, the more you have to dig into code.

A heavily customized CMS site means either heavily customizing existing theme code or building a theme from scratch. This is not only true of Wordpress, which has only recently morphed from a blog site application to a full CMS. The same can be said of other CMS options like Joomla and Drupal. Of the three, Wordpress is the easiest to learn to use, but the most limited. Joomla has the most options out of the box, but also the most bloat. Drupal is the most secure, but it takes the most work to customize. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, as does a custom site built in HTML/CSS.

The real question you need to ask is, which of these options will meet your needs best, not just immediately, but over the long term. While it's great to be able to make changes to a site's design at any time, it's also great to be able to add content any time without having to constantly tweak or add core pages, change menus, etc.
Nov 23 12 01:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jay Lee Studios
Posts: 1,238
San Diego, California, US


I used to use wordpress. But then I found that when ever an update happened on my theme the links wouldn't work or I would have to click up and away from the link to actually click it. After that I went full custom site. From code not dreamweaver.

I quickly learned how to design sites in Photoshop and then have a guy I know code them in PHP and CSS. I am not able to create any website the way I want it and have started doing it as part of my business model.  Sure it costs you more, but now you have a one off custom site with an easy built in cms that you never need to worry about code for.

My site www.jayleestudios.com is one of my designs as well as custom coding with private galleries for clients, contact form and everything is functional and easy to use. If you want one made message me and we can talk details.
Nov 25 12 01:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hugh Alison
Posts: 2,105
Aberystwyth, Wales, United Kingdom


Five hours reading "Wordpress for Dummies" was all I needed - downloaded a theme, customised it a bit.

No too difficult really.
Nov 25 12 02:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JGC Photography
Posts: 134
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada


I don't care what CMS you select none of them will get your site up and running in minutes or perhaps even hours...If I have learned anything in business it is that hiring a good website programmer/developer is among the best money a businessman can spend.

Once you choose a guy have him pick the CMS he wants to use for your application...Then for god's sake (and your own)...get out of his way! Most experts can set up a photography site for very little cost.  A retailing site is not much more expensive FYI.

I can't begin to tell you how many times my web guys have saved my ass...Taking a royally screwed site and getting it up and running...In minutes! God I love those guys!

If you wish to evolve your business from a point and click amateur site to something special that properly represents and reflects your work....You owe it to yourself to let someone do you justice.

School of hard knocks and nasty lessons speaking.

Peace
Nov 25 12 08:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GCobb Photography
Posts: 15,891
Southaven, Mississippi, US


Wordpress isn't for a beginner.  My site is done with it.  Options are endless.  But the biggest complaint is that I can't embed php into one of the pages.  If I'm wrong, someone please let me now.  There is a photo gallery I want to use that's PHP.  I don't have $300 to put on a third party gallery and anything else I've seen just throws thumbnails on a page.
Nov 25 12 08:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KA Style
Posts: 1,583
Syracuse, New York, US


I personally love Wordpress. I have a hosted WP install I pay for. Its really easy to use once you get the hang of it. I love my blog & website are as one.

Most themes on Theme Forest are great and Really customizable if you know coding. Or just hire someone to make some coding changes for you. Use one that has good customer service and spend time reading through comments on a theme you like.

Some themes can be tricky for an average user though.
Nov 25 12 08:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
terrysphotocountry
Posts: 4,064
Rochester, New York, US


Nov 25 12 08:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ally Moy
Posts: 404
Morris Plains, New Jersey, US


GCobb Photography wrote:
Wordpress isn't for a beginner.  My site is done with it.  Options are endless.  But the biggest complaint is that I can't embed php into one of the pages.  If I'm wrong, someone please let me now.  There is a photo gallery I want to use that's PHP.  I don't have $300 to put on a third party gallery and anything else I've seen just throws thumbnails on a page.

An "inline php" plugin is probably what you want. smile

Nov 26 12 01:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ezhini
Posts: 1,596
Wichita, Kansas, US


JGC Photography wrote:
I don't care what CMS you select none of them will get your site up and running in minutes or perhaps even hours...If I have learned anything in business it is that hiring a good website programmer/developer is among the best money a businessman can spend.

Once you choose a guy have him pick the CMS he wants to use for your application...Then for god's sake (and your own)...get out of his way! Most experts can set up a photography site for very little cost.  A retailing site is not much more expensive FYI.

I can't begin to tell you how many times my web guys have saved my ass...Taking a royally screwed site and getting it up and running...In minutes! God I love those guys!

If you wish to evolve your business from a point and click amateur site to something special that properly represents and reflects your work....You owe it to yourself to let someone do you justice.

School of hard knocks and nasty lessons speaking.

Peace

+1

Nov 26 12 07:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KA Style
Posts: 1,583
Syracuse, New York, US


I will say I jumped in SE ranks switching to a Wordpress site. Huge jump.


Bottom line do what works best for you and your business.

A website is super important so dont skimp even if you have to hire a pro, it will be the best money you'll ever spend on your business. A half arse website implies one will get half arse service/product. Its your first impression so make it a good one. You'll never go wrong with a quality website and business cards. Websites are so cheap now a days there is no excuse..
Nov 26 12 08:54 am  Link  Quote 
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