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Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


I am seriously thinking about doing this. I am really interested in knowing more about my father's side. To be honest all I know is my great grandfather was German/Shawnee and that is pretty much as far as it goes. Everyone else has no clue of their geneology on that side of the family.

At the age of 12 I conducted  a geneology of my entire mother's side of the family(pretty much entirely French and Echota Cherokee).

I am still working on that thing and think that this testing would help maybe fill in some interesting gaps that I am missing on both sides of the family.

Here is some info about it from the web page, I think everyone should check it out. I really want to do it... Anyone know of anyone that has done it yet, what did they find out if so?

Price is $199.95... ummm

"The Genographic Project is a multiyear research initiative led by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Spencer Wells. Dr. Wells and a team of renowned international scientists are using cutting-edge genetic and computational technologies to analyze historical patterns in DNA from participants around the world to better understand our human genetic roots. The three components of the project are:
■To gather and analyze research data in collaboration with indigenous and traditional peoples around the world
■To invite the general public to join this real-time scientific project and to learn about their own deep ancestry by purchasing a Genographic Project Participation and DNA Ancestry Kit, Geno 2.0
■To use a portion of the proceeds from Geno 2.0 kit sales to further research and the Genographic Legacy Fund, which in turn supports community-led indigenous conservation and revitalization projects

The Genographic Project is anonymous, nonmedical, and nonprofit, and all results are placed in the public domain following scientific peer publication."
https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/about/
Nov 15 12 02:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Little Queenie
Posts: 6,213
Indio, California, US


It's probably going to cost more than that if they have to draw blood.
Nov 15 12 03:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


Little Queenie wrote:
It's probably going to cost more than that if they have to draw blood.

It does. But I am lucky I know a phlebotomist, I am going to text him about this and see if he know about the Geno 2.0 and how much it is to draw blood.... Ummmm

Nov 15 12 03:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C. Scott Photography
Posts: 1,402
Huntington Beach, California, US


I just don't care much about the past.  Where I come from has never been slightly as important as where I'm going.

At least, specifically speaking. 

I love history in general, but I just don't think any 1 person's genetic path (least of all mine) matters in the grand scheme.
Nov 15 12 06:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelli
Posts: 24,257
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I didn't do this, but I did a lot of research on my genealogy and it was a truly amazing experience.

I think you should go for it. You'll probably discover some fascinating things.
Nov 15 12 06:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,078
New York, New York, US


I love the Genographic Project!

I would consider doing it myself... (have already an interesting blood mixture, found mostly in Asia... I blame the Mongols/Huns), once I have some spare money... too many bills I have to cover.
Nov 15 12 06:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


udor wrote:
I love the Genographic Project!

I would consider doing it myself... (have already an interesting blood mixture, found mostly in Asia... I blame the Mongols/Huns), once I have some spare money... too many bills I have to cover.

I know. I really want to do it and I might just do this as a Christmas gift to myself. tongue
Damn it I am buying it... for Christmas... made me mind up! I will fill everyone in on how it goes... umm.

Nov 16 12 08:58 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


C. Scott Photography wrote:
I just don't care much about the past.  Where I come from has never been slightly as important as where I'm going.

At least, specifically speaking. 

I love history in general, but I just don't think any 1 person's genetic path (least of all mine) matters in the grand scheme.

I think it is rather interesting. I mean I am horrible at science! BUT I really love history. So I would love to find out more about this entire study and that of my own background. Its rather interesting.

Nov 16 12 09:00 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


Kelli wrote:
I didn't do this, but I did a lot of research on my genealogy and it was a truly amazing experience.

I think you should go for it. You'll probably discover some fascinating things.

big_smile I would love to find out some weird interesting biological stuff as well.

Nov 16 12 09:05 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


No blood required! Its all done off cheek cells. Whoo hoo.
Nov 16 12 09:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


This is about deep ancestry - tens of thousands of years with perhaps a few thousand years of resolution. This won't tell you much about all your relatives over the last several generations.

The new platform dramatically increases the genetic marker set, so it should provide a high resolution data set of human migration patterns for the last 50,000 to 100,000 years.
Nov 16 12 09:44 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Bella la Bell
Posts: 4,451
Kansas City, Missouri, US


Tony-S wrote:
This is about deep ancestry - tens of thousands of years with perhaps a few thousand years of resolution. This won't tell you much about all your relatives over the last several generations.

The new platform dramatically increases the genetic marker set, so it should provide a high resolution data set of human migration patterns for the last 50,000 to 100,000 years.

Dude thanks for the ovious. roll

Nov 16 12 11:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


Bella la Bell wrote:
Dude thanks for the ovious. roll

You seemed to suggest in your OP that this might discriminate tribal differences of your Native American heritage; however, unless the genetic markers are already well-defined, it may not. The beauty of this approach, though, is that the more who participate the higher the resolution of the test and the more informative it becomes. But it will not connect the dots of direct ancestry for anyone; it only provides a statistical probability of your ancestry. For example, I did my Y chromosome with this group a couple of years ago and my statistically most likely ancestry is from central Africa to Saudi Arabia, along the Persian coast to what is now India/Pakistan, back through what is now Iran to Syria/Israel and finally into southern Europe (Slovenia, Croatia, Italy). That is the most likely route, but not the unequivocal route. It is also contrary to the route taken by 90% of people of European ancestry, most of whom can be traced through the central Caucuses.

Nov 16 12 12:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelli
Posts: 24,257
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Bella la Bell wrote:
No blood required! Its all done off cheek cells. Whoo hoo.

And for less then $200!? Do you know how far back they go, if they give actual info on your ancestors or do they strictly tell you what nationalities are in your blood/cells?

Nov 16 12 01:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


Kelli wrote:
And for less then $200!? Do you know how far back they go, if they give actual info on your ancestors or do they strictly tell you what nationalities are in your blood/cells?

It probably dates back to about 50,000 to 100,000 years ago and trace your ancestry to what is now Tanzania/Kenya. No, no info on your actual ancestors, only the statistically most likely route your ancestors took - no nationalities are involved (since nationalities are a very recent phenomena anyway). They can only tell the region your ancestors most likely took (and reference those to geographic regions by current nations). It will not tell you anything about diseases - these markers are from the noncoding region of the genome in all likelihood.

Nov 16 12 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Le_Demimonde
Posts: 100
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Bella la Bell wrote:

It does. But I am lucky I know a phlebotomist, I am going to text him about this and see if he know about the Geno 2.0 and how much it is to draw blood.... Ummmm

Um, I don't think there is a state inthe union that allows a licensed Phlebotomist to extract a blood sample to hand off to the patient directly.

I'd start with your Primary Care Physician and explain your purpose and he/she can likely authorize a direct-send. Blood cultures are very delicate and easily corruptable, having a limited "shelf life" for the kind of analysis this project entails.

Nov 16 12 01:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


Le_Demimonde wrote:
Um, I don't think there is a state inthe union that allows a licensed Phlebotomist to extract a blood sample to hand off to the patient directly.

I'd start with your Primary Care Physician and explain your purpose and he/she can likely authorize a direct-send. Blood cultures are very delicate and easily corruptable, having a limited "shelf life" for the kind of analysis this project entails.

It's not necessary for this test. It is a swab of the inside of the mouth that gets put into a buffer for shipment. No blood required, the swab has cells from the mouth that are constantly sloughed.

Nov 16 12 02:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelli
Posts: 24,257
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Tony-S wrote:

It probably dates back to about 50,000 to 100,000 years ago and trace your ancestry to what is now Tanzania/Kenya. No, no info on your actual ancestors, only the statistically most likely route your ancestors took - no nationalities are involved (since nationalities are a very recent phenomena anyway). They can only tell the region your ancestors most likely took (and reference those to geographic regions by current nations). It will not tell you anything about diseases - these markers are from the noncoding region of the genome in all likelihood.

VERY interesting!

Nov 17 12 06:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lightcraft Studio
Posts: 12,055
Delray Beach, Florida, US


Le_Demimonde wrote:
Um, I don't think there is a state inthe union that allows a licensed Phlebotomist to extract a blood sample to hand off to the patient directly.

My cat will be happy to draw blood from anyone at all... just pet her when she doesn't feel like being petted.

Nov 17 12 09:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


Just did my cheek swabs. Will drop the samples off in the mail today. Six to 8 weeks and they even tell you how much Neanderthal and Denisovan you are!
Nov 28 12 01:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Bots
Posts: 5,690
Kingston, Ontario, Canada


Never know what DNA testing will find.   Wonder where they will fit this in.

Already submitted for scientific peer review --

Researchers claim sequenced 'Bigfoot' DNA
http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2012/11/27/ … 354065000/

Oxford makes big push
http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/23/oxfo … iss-zoolo/

Bigfoot DNA Tests Prove Hairy Creature Exists
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/2 … 99984.html

Igor Burtsev releases info, Ketchum Responds
http://www.bigfootlunchclub.com/2012/11 … t-dna.html


"Ketchum said her team has sequenced three complete Sasquatch nuclear genomes and concluded the species is a human hybrid.

"Our study has sequenced 20 whole mitochondrial genomes and utilized next generation sequencing to obtain three whole nuclear genomes from purported Sasquatch samples," she said in the release. "The genome sequencing shows that Sasquatch mtDNA is identical to modern Homo sapiens, but Sasquatch nuDNA is a novel, unknown hominin related to Homo sapiens and other primate species.

"Our data indicate that the North American Sasquatch is a hybrid species, the result of males of an unknown hominin species crossing with female Homo sapiens."


"Genetic testing has already ruled out Homo neanderthalis and the Denisova hominin as contributors to Sasquatch mtDNA or nuDNA, she said."
Nov 28 12 06:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


Michael Bots wrote:
Researchers claim sequenced 'Bigfoot' DNA

All that bigfoot crap is nonsense.

Nov 28 12 06:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Bots
Posts: 5,690
Kingston, Ontario, Canada


That would explain Oxford University and the Lausanne Museum of Zoology setting up the "Collateral Hominid" project.
Nov 28 12 06:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


My sample is 60% complete. Hopefully only a couple more weeks of waiting.
Jan 04 13 12:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


I guess the joke's on you.

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/02/ … h-is-real/

Michael Bots wrote:
Never know what DNA testing will find.   Wonder where they will fit this in.

Already submitted for scientific peer review --

Researchers claim sequenced 'Bigfoot' DNA
http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2012/11/27/ … 354065000/

Oxford makes big push
http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/23/oxfo … iss-zoolo/

Bigfoot DNA Tests Prove Hairy Creature Exists
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/2 … 99984.html

Igor Burtsev releases info, Ketchum Responds
http://www.bigfootlunchclub.com/2012/11 … t-dna.html


"Ketchum said her team has sequenced three complete Sasquatch nuclear genomes and concluded the species is a human hybrid.

"Our study has sequenced 20 whole mitochondrial genomes and utilized next generation sequencing to obtain three whole nuclear genomes from purported Sasquatch samples," she said in the release. "The genome sequencing shows that Sasquatch mtDNA is identical to modern Homo sapiens, but Sasquatch nuDNA is a novel, unknown hominin related to Homo sapiens and other primate species.

"Our data indicate that the North American Sasquatch is a hybrid species, the result of males of an unknown hominin species crossing with female Homo sapiens."


"Genetic testing has already ruled out Homo neanderthalis and the Denisova hominin as contributors to Sasquatch mtDNA or nuDNA, she said."

Feb 14 13 04:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rick Edwards
Posts: 6,159
Wilmington, Delaware, US


I think white supremacists should do this....
Feb 14 13 05:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,362
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


I'm 44% Mediterranian (Italy),  36% northern European (German), 18% southwest Aisan and 2% northeastern Asian. No idea how where that last 2% came from! I also have 2.2% Neanderthal and 3.3% Denisovan DNA. These explain much of my behavior! smile
Feb 14 13 06:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tropic Light
Posts: 7,261
Kailua, Hawaii, US


Tony-S wrote:
I'm 44% Mediterranian (Italy),  36% northern European (German), 18% southwest Aisan and 2% northeastern Asian. No idea how where that last 2% came from! I also have 2.2% Neanderthal and 3.3% Denisovan DNA. These explain much of my behavior! smile

I came in at 42% Northern European, 38% Mediterranean, and 19% Southwest Asian.  My Neanderthal percentage is 3.2%, and my Denisovan is 3.7%.  It sounds like our ancestors were into inter-species mating. Living out on the Asian steppes, I can understand how a Neanderthal cutie might warm up your cave on those long, cold winter nights.  big_smile

Feb 14 13 07:15 pm  Link  Quote 
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