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Photographer
Marc Blizzurd
Posts: 678
Belmar, New Jersey, US


Do people in warm climates ( 70+ ) suffer from the common cold?
Nov 16 12 02:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
john_ellis
Posts: 4,375
Spokane, Washington, US


Anyone who is exposed to a cold or flu virus can get it - regardless of the temperature.
Nov 16 12 02:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 32,036
Los Angeles, California, US


john_ellis wrote:
Anyone who is exposed to a cold or flu virus can get it - regardless of the temperature.

Tell that to my grandmother. She yells at everyone to bundle up and she's always shocked if someone has a cold in warm weather.

Nov 16 12 02:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
john_ellis
Posts: 4,375
Spokane, Washington, US


NothingIsRealButTheGirl wrote:

Tell that to my grandmother. She yells at everyone to bundle up and she's always shocked if someone has a cold in warm weather.

Grandmas seem to have the most fucked up remedies.

When I was about 10 or so, I was making french toast at my grandma's house unsupervised.  I put way too much oil in the pan, and when I lifted the bread to switch sides, it dropped off and splashed hot oil all over me.

Her solution:  Rub butter on it.  Screamed like a mofo.

Nov 16 12 02:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marc Blizzurd
Posts: 678
Belmar, New Jersey, US


It's always during the under 60 temps.
Nov 16 12 02:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
john_ellis
Posts: 4,375
Spokane, Washington, US


Marc Blizzurd  wrote:
It's always during the under 60 temps.

That's not true.  I had a cold over the summer.   It was like 90 degrees.  Colds and flus have seasons, but it's due to habits and how we create better environments for the viruses.

WebMD.com is your friend.  Learn about cold and flu viruses.

Nov 16 12 02:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marc Blizzurd
Posts: 678
Belmar, New Jersey, US


john_ellis wrote:

That's not true.  I had a cold over the summer.   It was like 90 degrees.  Colds and flus have seasons, but it's due to habits and how we create better environments for the viruses.

WebMD.com is your friend.  Learn about cold and flu viruses.

LOL NyQuil depends on cold season

Nov 16 12 03:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
hygvhgvkhy
Posts: 2,092
Chicago, Illinois, US


john_ellis wrote:

Grandmas seem to have the most fucked up remedies.

When I was about 10 or so, I was making french toast at my grandma's house unsupervised.  I put way too much oil in the pan, and when I lifted the bread to switch sides, it dropped off and splashed hot oil all over me.

Her solution:  Rub butter on it.  Screamed like a mofo.

I'd say milk..

Seriously.. Butter isn't that far off

Nov 16 12 03:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Friday Art Photography
Posts: 377
Atlantic, Iowa, US


Presley ONeil wrote:

I'd say milk..

Seriously.. Butter isn't that far off

Nope, use Honey:


The most closely related scientific inquiry actually offers hope for another natural substance. In 2004, the publishers of the New Zealand Ministry of Health’s Complementary and Alternative Medicine website evaluated six cases in India in which honey was used as a primary dressing for burn wounds. The publishers concluded that superficial and deeper (so-called partial thickness ) burns treated with honey dressings healed faster and were less likely to become infected than similar burns treated more conventionally. They also reported no side effects. It is important to note that this report described a very small study, and that the healing properties of butter and honey cannot be reliably compared.

Nov 16 12 03:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marc Blizzurd
Posts: 678
Belmar, New Jersey, US


Honey and warm tea?
Nov 16 12 03:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Roy Hubbard
Posts: 2,756
New York, New York, US


Presley ONeil wrote:

I'd say milk..

Seriously.. Butter isn't that far off

A two second google search says otherwise.

Nov 16 12 03:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
hygvhgvkhy
Posts: 2,092
Chicago, Illinois, US


Friday Art Photography wrote:

Nope, use Honey:


The most closely related scientific inquiry actually offers hope for another natural substance. In 2004, the publishers of the New Zealand Ministry of Health’s Complementary and Alternative Medicine website evaluated six cases in India in which honey was used as a primary dressing for burn wounds. The publishers concluded that superficial and deeper (so-called partial thickness ) burns treated with honey dressings healed faster and were less likely to become infected than similar burns treated more conventionally. They also reported no side effects. It is important to note that this report described a very small study, and that the healing properties of butter and honey cannot be reliably compared.

YES!!! But now, do you have a link to this study? Was it raw honey? Because I imagine what's in processed honey we eat wouldn't be that great for a burn...

But again, milk has always worked for me&its right there in the fridge.. :shrug:

Nov 16 12 09:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 36,036
Columbus, Ohio, US


Presley ONeil wrote:

YES!!! But now, do you have a link to this study? Was it raw honey? Because I imagine what's in processed honey we eat wouldn't be that great for a burn...

But again, milk has always worked for me&its right there in the fridge.. :shrug:

Best thing for a burn is that cold water running right there in your tap, and not expensive as milk. :shrug:

Nov 16 12 09:26 pm  Link  Quote 
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