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Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,566
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


First post in this particular section of MM... I normally don't do a lot of skin retouching from shoots, but lately I'm starting to need a regular process (other than the healing tool) to help me take care of rough skin due to time constraint issues. I've been searching around different tutorials and trying them out; some are too much and fake looking- others don't really work very well for me, as I get a different result each time I try.

I (think) finally found one that works for me- but compared to what I'm used too, I still think it might be too much and would like to ask for opinions and feedback/direction.

I am not completely finished, and there are some hairs, etc. i'll still be taking out, but i'm headed off to a shoot and wanted to leave this here.

Please don't take and retouch the photo yourself then just post in here- if you are going to do something to the image and post it, then please give me step by step direction on what you think what I should do/what you did, and what you would recommend so I can try it out myself.

Thanks big_smile

edit: removed, going to just go to a different shot
Nov 27 12 02:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Abe Rempel
Posts: 95
Windsor, Ontario, Canada


I feel like the skin's texture needs to be more obvious. It looks a little too smooth which gives it that plastic look.
Nov 27 12 02:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,566
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


Abe Rempel wrote:
I feel like the skin's texture needs to be more obvious. It looks a little too smooth which gives it that plastic look.

That's what I was worried about. I'll play some more when I get home. Thanks !

Nov 27 12 02:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Elliot
Posts: 599
Honolulu, Hawaii, US


Also the contrast between skin and model is heightened due to the hyper sharp outfit / hair ... maybe tone down the post processing sharpening just a lil bit?
Nov 27 12 03:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,740
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Yes...and the skin tone is ridiculous for a black person. (I'm black)

Also it's been processed so much that the face looks flat. You could do wonders by adding a bit of D&B carving to give her face some dimension.
Nov 27 12 03:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Is the blue cast deliberate? I don't think it's wrong, just wondered if you intended it.

http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/6789/skin2s.jpg
Nov 27 12 03:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,566
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


The blue cast wasn't deliberate-- I will warm it up a little; we were just shooting outside in the shade. She was also freaking cold. I did not sharpen the photo at all, nor  did I set the camera to do any in-camera sharpening. It's just the way files look from my D800. Processing wise, all I did was brighten it a little- I didn't touch anything else, any colors, or any other settings yet.

Any advice, etc. would be helpful as i'm going to try and tackle this again in the morning.

Deleted image, mostly because i'm going to ditch it and move onto another one.
Nov 27 12 06:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,075
Orlando, Florida, US


What I see is too much dark from under her nose and cheekbones to her chin.  I run into this issue sometimes when I'm so concerned with evening out the skin to think about the lightness difference from cheek to jaw.

What ends up happening is that 5 o'clock shadow syndrome.

That's what I see here, not so much because of your finishing, but from the actual lighting.  You might disagree, and if so, no problem.  But I've found it to be something I look for in my own images now.
Nov 27 12 06:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPierce Photography
Posts: 19,566
Amherst, Massachusetts, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:
What I see is too much dark from under her nose and cheekbones to her chin.  I run into this issue sometimes when I'm so concerned with evening out the skin to think about the lightness difference from cheek to jaw.

What ends up happening is that 5 o'clock shadow syndrome.

That's what I see here, not so much because of your finishing, but from the actual lighting.  You might disagree, and if so, no problem.  But I've found it to be something I look for in my own images now.

I agree with you totally - we were in such a rush because she was so cold; she wanted on location instead of studio- believe me-I offered. we did a rush shoot; the entire thing lasted about 45 minutes/an hour, with about 20 minutes of that being drive time, then she was done. I didn't have the time I normally take to set my lighting perfect and move to different locations.

I believe I have other shots with more even lighting- so perhaps it's probably best to just throw this one away and move onto another. I have no idea why I zoomed in on this one- it was just the first one I pulled, so was practicing on it.

Nov 27 12 06:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ronald N. Tan
Posts: 2,721
Los Angeles, California, US


Hiya Stephanie,

In a time like this, if you had a white balance card, you won't have to guess the starting basis white balance setting. Although you could correct for the cool cast, I am in favor of capturing the correct basis for further manipulation in post.

I think the skin look a little too much done. Try to decrease the effects a tiny bit.
Nov 27 12 09:13 pm  Link  Quote 
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