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Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,614
Phoenix, Arizona, US


For the past several weeks I've been seriously considering changing my diet. Not to really eat different things, but to eat better choices of the things I do eat.

I already got into the habit of buying meat at the butcher, produce at the farmer's market, dairy at an actual dairy, etc.. In other words, no Wal Mart or super market for most perishable items.

But now I'm looking into grass fed/free range beef. I found a place in Tucson that delivers to Phoenix, but you have to buy pretty much a whole quarter cow. I don't mind paying more, but still curiosity has me wondering what the approximate difference in price would be if I were to buy each item in the package individually at the supermarket.

Here's the package list ($600-$650 per order):
http://www.datecreekranch.com/ordering/ … ting-list/

Anyone care to give a rough estimate of the difference in cost?
Dec 08 12 10:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Cole Morrison
Posts: 3,958
Portland, Oregon, US


I'd rather eat grass, even, than grass fed.

Vegetarian smile
Dec 08 12 10:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Schlake
Posts: 2,418
Socorro, New Mexico, US


The basically charge you $6.30 a pound for meat.  All in all, comparing their list of cuts and price to what I know I can buy at my store, I think that sounds like a pretty good deal.  I know could beat the prices by only buying things on sale, but I'm not sure I could just buying things at regular price.
Dec 08 12 10:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DOUGLASFOTOS
Posts: 8,351
Los Angeles, California, US


http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr176/KwanFamily_Cruise2008/Japan%202010/Day2045.jpg
Dec 08 12 11:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Paolo Diavolo
Posts: 8,530
Martinez, California, US


does free range really make a difference?

i always thought it was just bullshit.
like how global warming is used as a marketing ploy to sell hybrid cars and other products to idiots.
i guess it makes for more jobs?

"buy more expensive meat, cause this animal was happier before we killed it"
Dec 08 12 11:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,614
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Paolo Diavolo wrote:
does free range really make a difference?

i always thought it was just bullshit.
like how global warming is used as a marketing ploy to sell hybrid cars and other products to idiots.
i guess it makes for more jobs?

"buy more expensive meat, cause this animal was happier before we killed it"

Actually, I think it has more to do with what they're fed. Naturally, cows don't eat corn and chicken shit (which means we're eating it too)

Dec 08 12 11:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Paolo Diavolo
Posts: 8,530
Martinez, California, US


John Jebbia wrote:
Actually, I think it has more to do with what they're fed.
Naturally, cows don't eat corn and chicken shit (which means we're eating it too)

so you want to eat an animal which supposedly had a good diet when it was alive?
because you feel it will be better for you?

is that the appeal and belief of people who want grass fed/free range meat?

(genuinely curious)

this thread makes me want a burger.

Dec 08 12 11:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,614
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Paolo Diavolo wrote:
so you want to eat an animal which supposedly had a good diet when it was alive?
because you feel it will be better for you?

is that the appeal and belief of people who want grass fed/free range meat?

(genuinely curious)

Well a couple of reasons I started reading up on this stuff.. and I'm by no means a bleeding heart..

1. The diet of an animal directly relates to what you're eating when you eat it. If it eats shit, you eat shit.

2. This is the bleeding heart part. I've never been comfortable with the way mass produced meat is raised. While it never stopped me from eating it, I always wished I knew of an alternative if I wanted to eat beef, lamb, pork. Now I do..

P.S. I found a better site where I don't have to buy the whole fucking cow!

http://grassrootsmeats.com/

Dec 08 12 11:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Paolo Diavolo
Posts: 8,530
Martinez, California, US


mass produced seems like healthy enough animals to eat IMO as long as its fresh meat.
we put plenty of other crap in our bodies.
...but i dont blame people for wanting things a little more upscale.
Dec 08 12 11:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


Buying halves or quarters can be cheaper, but you're not going to have a lot of say in the quality of cut. Generally, via mail order, you're not going to have your choice of steer or anything of the sort. You might get 5 really wonderful steaks and a bunch of crap that's barely useful as stew meat.

The whole "grass fed" thing is a bunch of hooey. There may be farms out there that are 100% grass fed, but the animals are still going to be dosed with medications and possibly hormones. For flavor, most are "grain finished" a few months before slaughter (in other words, they're put on the line with the rest of the "meat-on-the-hoof".)

If there are 100% grass-fed, free-range steers out there for purchase, you just might not like the flavor (it's going to be different than what you're used to.) You're also not going to buy it for $6.50/pound. I've had my share and I actually prefer beef that has been "fatted" a bit.

The average processed price around here runs about $6.00/pound when buying a half. Granted, it's nice to see a few strip steaks and the like in the lot, but you're not going to get very many (make sure you understand the difference between hanging weight and processed weight.) The bulk of the animal will be in chuck and roast. If you've ever tasted farm-raised, chemical free chuck/roast, you might not be quite so thrilled (it has a more "game" flavor.)

Also, are you going to use that quantity in a year's time? Beef frozen longer than that will taste... iffy.

Also, do you have a large freezer and a backup generator should the power fail? Hell, would you have a backup means of storage should your freezer die? Trying to find alternative storage for 100+ pounds of meat could be a potential headache. I would also check to make sure that your insurance covers food loss in the event of power failure.
Dec 09 12 12:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
D M E C K E R T
Posts: 4,786
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


i have issues with grass fed.

i tried it last summer, and wasn't thrilled. it's definitely a bit gamier...but the smell, more than the taste, put me off. it reeked of beef (and not in an unfresh way, just in a very very beefy way. bleh). the kitchen stunk for days. at home, i'm perfectly happy to use whatever angus is available at the supermarket. and at the few restaurants i eat steak, i'm happy not to question it.
Dec 09 12 12:55 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Model Sarah
Posts: 39,040
Columbus, Ohio, US


Paolo Diavolo wrote:
so you want to eat an animal which supposedly had a good diet when it was alive?
because you feel it will be better for you?

is that the appeal and belief of people who want grass fed/free range meat?

(genuinely curious)

this thread makes me want a burger.

I'm a big foodie and I have an extensive palate as well. Having said that, I can actually taste the difference in grass fed beef as opposed to the mass produced corn fed. John is absolutely right about you are what you eat. Why would you choose to eat something that was fed crap vs something good if you don't have to?

I went to my boyfriend's sisters house for Thanksgiving (the day after). She prepared an organic grass fed turkey in a very similar way my sister (the day before) prepared a mass produced turkey. The difference was quite astounding. It's similar to the way cage free eggs taste different than regular eggs. They are more bright yellow/orange and the taste is a lot richer. Now most of that stuff I cannot tell the difference but with meat and eggs, I absolutely can.

Dec 09 12 05:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Back in my high school days I worked at a nearby horse and cattle ranch. The cattle were hormone-free, mostly alfalfa-and-grass-fed but with some grain supplement, and as free of antibiotics as was safe and legal. (The couple had recently lost a child to cancer and the wife went total vegan. The husband's concesssion was beef and chicken raised as naturally as was feasible.)

I got fed steaks for lunch. The first time I saw the meat raw, I was taken aback. Compared to the bright red stuff from the store, this beef was almost gray. Cooked up, though, it looked fine and tasted like heaven.
Dec 09 12 06:31 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Cait Chan
Posts: 6,272
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Paolo Diavolo wrote:
mass produced seems like healthy enough animals to eat IMO as long as its fresh meat.
we put plenty of other crap in our bodies.
...but i dont blame people for wanting things a little more upscale.

It's not about being upscale because to others that's NOT healthy enough 

Animals fed with hormones, and loaded up with fatty crap gets passed directly on to you because you're eating it. Free range means they're not couped up, kept in confining unhealthy conditions where the spread of disease is rampant and the animals are treated cruelly.

A happy, healthy animal makes happy, healthy meat. You can taste it and in the end it's healthier all around.

Dec 09 12 06:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,546
Glendora, California, US


John.  I worked on an organic beef farm for eight summers.   The best beef you can buy is Kobe beef from Japan.  Hands down. 
Now, in the states, the only difference I've found is actually in the hanging time.  Most large beef companies hang their beef for two weeks before cutting up into pieces or sending off to butchers, but three weeks will produce much, much better beef!  The enzymes have that extra week to 'tenderize' it.  Extra hanging time works for organic, free range, free range- then corn fed, or purely fed in troughs.

I've done side by side tests for hanging time four times in my life.  Three weeks is better.   

Careful with free range beef.   Deserts of the U.S. have a lot of free range beef, but the only thing to eat on the free range is sagebrush, creosote brush and dirt!  Not the best feed for cattle.  Many trough fed cattle that are fed feed from silos are much better than free range, because they're getting what they should be getting.  Alfalfa, clover, timothy, etc. 

The ONLY way to test if the beef is good or not, is to take the exact same cut from one source, and cook it next to the exact same cut of what you're trying to test.

You WILL taste a difference in all grass fed beef.  GRASS FED BEEF ISN'T VERY GOOD FOR THE BEEF.  Grass has LITTLE FEED VALUE!  You may not like it.  Test, test, test.  There's a reason free range farmers feed their cattle a mixture of chopped corn plant mixed with corn to fatten them up.  It tastes better.  Much better.  They only do this the final three months of the steer's life.  Alfalfa, clover, and timothy etc are legumes that are much better for the cattle and produce much better tasting meat, and Alfalfa, clover, and timothy etc fields are harvested and put into silos.  This is the best possible feed, nutritionally, for the cattle, and produces the best quality meat.  Free range is bullshit! 

Buying in bulk will save you money, but you'll have to buy another freezer to keep it.  But, it looks like you've found another source.   

Without testing, you're going to be happy with pretty much anything you buy.  People from Texas think Texas beef is the best.  People from Iowa think that Iowa beef is best.  People from Connecticut think that Connecticut beef is best.  Test, test, test.
Dec 09 12 07:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


Carlos Occidental wrote:
John.  The best beef you can buy is Kobe beef from Japan.  Hands down.

What I find somewhat ironic about this is that Tajima beef is almost exclusive grain fed (to the point of giving the cattle beer mash.)

big_smile

Dec 09 12 07:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,546
Glendora, California, US


Yes, they give Kobe beef beer regularly in the summer to stimulate appetite!  ! 

The problem with Kobe beef in America is, it's not really Kobe beef.  None is exported out of Japan.  But, there is high quality Kobe 'style' beef in the U.S. of very high quality.
Dec 09 12 07:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bill Bates
Posts: 3,815
Payson, Utah, US


If you are paying extra for "free range, grass fed" beef, you're getting screwed. Plain and simple it is marketing hype for people with more money than brains.

I live in a little Utah town where my neighbors still move their cattle up main street from winter pastures into the mountains where the cattle spend their summers. We've grown a beef or two out for slaughter. It has been awhile since we're bought a side of beef but $6 plus dollars seems crazy high for a quarter, cut and wrapped, so I checked a few of the local packers prices. Looks like grain fed quarter price is running about $3.50/lbs. Grass fed runs locally is anywhere from $2 something a pound from a major packer to over $6 from some of the outfits with fancy web pages, nice BS and pretty pictures of happy cows near old style painted barns. (I have no idea where those pretty barns are but they ain't local)

The major cost of beefs production comes when those cattle are grain fed for their last three months before slaughter. The time in the feed lot the cattle don't run much so muscles soften and the grain adds fat and flavor to those muscles.

A beef slaughtered just off summer range will be tough, stringy and gamey but it will be grass fed and free range. I guess if some of my neighbors can charge almost double for it, good for them.
Dec 09 12 07:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,546
Glendora, California, US


William Kious wrote:
The whole "grass fed" thing is a bunch of hooey. There may be farms out there that are 100% grass fed, but the animals are still going to be dosed with medications and possibly hormones. For flavor, most are "grain finished" a few months before slaughter (in other words, they're put on the line with the rest of the "meat-on-the-hoof".)

If there are 100% grass-fed, free-range steers out there for purchase, you just might not like the flavor (it's going to be different than what you're used to.) You're also not going to buy it for $6.50/pound. I've had my share and I actually prefer beef that has been "fatted" a bit.

Bill Bates wrote:
The major cost of beefs production comes when those cattle are grain fed for their last three months before slaughter. The time in the feed lot the cattle don't run much so muscles soften and the grain adds fat and flavor to those muscles.

A beef slaughtered just off summer range will be tough, stringy and gamey but it will be grass fed and free range. I guess if some of my neighbors can charge almost double for it, good for them.

Absolutely, positively true.  I'm glad there are two other sources here to back me up.

Dec 09 12 07:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bill Bates
Posts: 3,815
Payson, Utah, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
Compared to the bright red stuff from the store, this beef was almost gray. Cooked up, though, it looked fine and tasted like heaven.

That bright red color comes from carbon monoxide flushing in packaging to make it look bright red and fresh. The average consumer wouldn't ever buy a properly 30 day dry aged steak.

back to the OP's question. At $6.50/lbs. I would look to spend a bit more, buy bison if I wanted good flavor and a very healthy cut of meat.

Dec 09 12 07:50 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Amadea T
Posts: 3,448
Columbus, Ohio, US


Cole Morrison wrote:
I'd rather eat grass, even, than grass fed.

Vegetarian smile

+1   

Dec 09 12 08:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


Carlos Occidental wrote:
Now, in the states, the only difference I've found is actually in the hanging time.  Most large beef companies hang their beef for two weeks before cutting up into pieces or sending off to butchers, but three weeks will produce much, much better beef!  The enzymes have that extra week to 'tenderize' it.

Layman's explanation:

What tenderizes beef while hanging:

The colon of the cow/steer contains putrifactive germs, that are contained in the digestive tract via osmotic pressure.

Those putrifactive germs break down the ingested food to enable the extraction of nutrients and basically turning food matter into fecal matter... which we all experience every day... is soft.

After the death of the animal, the osmotic pressure disappears and those putrifactive germs spread throughout the entire animal and breaking down the the animal, according to their nature and function in the system... turning the animal slowly into feces... I mean... making it soft, or... tenderized.

Dec 09 12 08:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,546
Glendora, California, US


Cute, Udor, but completely ridiculous!  The entire insides of the steer are removed before hanging/aging.
Dec 09 12 08:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
Back in my high school days I worked at a nearby horse and cattle ranch. The cattle were hormone-free,

Wow!!! How old ARE you, REALLY!!! yikes   tongue

Dec 09 12 08:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


Carlos Occidental wrote:
Cute, Udor, but the entire insides of the steer are removed before hanging.

As I've said... "layman's explanation"... smile

I stand corrected... just read up on the aging meat process.

I am still correct if you eat roadkill... tongue

Dec 09 12 08:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ArtisticPhotography
Posts: 7,699
Buffalo, New York, US


You all have such a big-city mentality it makes me sad for you and glad I live in the middle of nowhere.

Let's start with Farmers Markets or whatever they call them, that have been mentioned. What's the difference between a tomato at your local grocery store and a tomato at a Farmer's Market. Generally, the store has someone go to the regional food wholesale co-op or auction and by their produce. It goes through a couple of hands and to the store's warehouse and arrives at your store. It's all done in big, refrigerated trucks with climate control and all of that stuff. The Farmer's Market is MUCH healthier and better. The farmer goes to the co-op or auction and buys the tomato, throws it in the back of his pickup, drives home, leave it there for a couple of days and then goes to the Farmers Market to sell it.

Beef, around there, except at Walmart, is all local. We don't have big farms so most of it is grass fed, I guess, because our farmers are too poor to buy much grain. Milk doesn't have that type of margin in it. So when the dairy cow gets old, it becomes the eating cow. If it doesn't say "Angus" then it's probably "Holstein".

Our local grocery store buys the winning cow at the local fair, each year, and sells it at a higher price with the picture of the cow right in the case and the blue ribbon right there. It's pretty cute. You know who's for dinner.

You can go to the slaughterhouses and get beef. They'll know what's what. Otherwise, it's a crap shoot.

As for $6.00 a lb beef, WOW. No way. You city folks are strange.
Dec 09 12 08:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ArtisticPhotography
Posts: 7,699
Buffalo, New York, US


udor wrote:
I stand corrected... j

!      wink

Dec 09 12 08:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MN camera
Posts: 1,861
Saint Paul, Minnesota, US


All the factors people are mentioning above (feed, hanging time, etc.) are relevant.  Consider also that free-range means the animal walks around more, thus getting more exercise, which may make some cuts a bit tougher.

Braising will take care of that.  Remember to add an acidic component to the braising liquid.

Also, a good idea is to find a local producer that doesn't do feed-lot finishing.  I live in a place where I don't remotely have the freezer space to make buying a quarter-cow practical, though family members do.  I've had some of what they get, and the difference is notable.

As Sarah said upthread, fresh eggs, too, are light-years ahead of the supermarket ones.  When I was cooking while a college student, we'd go through several flats of organic eggs a day at breakfast.  The taste was remarkable - just more "eggy" in all the right ways.  I think it had as much to do with the freshness as anything, as the whites, when cracked into a pan for over-easy, would always stand up as a good egg white should.

I live adjacent to a farmers' market and believe me, there are differences when the stuff you get is fresh, whatever it is.
Dec 09 12 10:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,546
Glendora, California, US


ArtisticPhotography wrote:
So when the dairy cow gets old, it becomes the eating cow. If it doesn't say "Angus" then it's probably "Holstein".

I've spent way too much time in up state New York.  While it is true that old milk cows get used for meat,  they're ground up for hamburger.  They're too old and not suitable for anything else. 
Unless you're eating a buger and your local fast food joint, you're not eating Holstein, or other dairy cow.

Beef steer that aren't pure Angus in NY are Hereford or a cross between Hereford and Angus, not old dairy cows.

Veal, on the other hand, is a different story.  Many veal calves are dairy calves.  But, they're fed on milk for three months, then slaughtered. 

Here's a Hereford:
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS95sNN4GM10muZX07854J1R6Jvrk4-mtqlfNMMZTlc3NeyueMkUw

Here's a black baldie, or Hereford/Angus cross:
http://pad1.whstatic.com/images/thumb/e/e5/Black_Hereford.JPG/256px-Black_Hereford.JPG

99 percent of beef steer in upstate NY is going to be Angus, Angus Hereford cross, or Hereford.
There are many types of dairy cow in upstate NY, but that's about it for beef.

ArtisticPhotography wrote:
Our local grocery store buys the winning cow at the local fair, each year, and sells it at a higher price with the picture of the cow right in the case and the blue ribbon right there. It's pretty cute. You know who's for dinner.

Again, cows aren't used for beef.  Unless you're trying to say steer?  A cow is a bovine animal that has had at least one calf, and are used for milk, or breeding steer.  A bull is the male bovine.  Steer are castrated males used for beef, and heifers (females which have never been bred) .
You're more a city person than you think.

Dec 09 12 11:22 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Connor Photography
Posts: 6,481
Elkton, Maryland, US


I just got back from Belize, The local cows are grass fed, the beef is much tougher and lot cheaper than the grain fed cows.  Their cost is as much as double.   sad
Dec 09 12 11:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


ArtisticPhotography wrote:
As for $6.00 a lb beef, WOW. No way. You city folks are strange.

I had visitors from Switzerland earlier this year and they couldn't believe how cheap the steaks were in the US...

Comparing the USA with Switzerland and the rest of Europe... meat/beef is dirt cheap in America while almost unaffordable in Europe, because the do not have those massive subventions by the government... hence... eating vegetarian is much much cheaper in Europe than in the US, while here... eating a vegetarian diet has no economic advantage for ones own wallet.

Here is an excerpt from the New York Times:

The staggering cost of rising world meat production

"Americans eat about the same amount of meat daily as they have for some time, about 8 ounces, or 230 grams, roughly twice the global average. At about 5 percent of the world's population, Americans grow and kill nearly 10 billion animals a year, more than 15 percent of the world's total.

Growing meat uses so many resources that it is a challenge to enumerate them all. But consider: An estimated 30 percent of the earth's ice-free land is directly or indirectly involved in livestock production, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, which also estimates that livestock production generates nearly a fifth of the world's greenhouse gases - more than transportation does.

To put the energy-using demand of meat production into easy-to-understand terms, Gidon Eshel, a geophysicist at Bard College at Simon's Rock in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and Pamela Martin, an assistant professor of geophysics at the University of Chicago, calculated that if Americans were to reduce meat consumption by just 20 percent, it would be as if they all switched from a standard sedan - a Camry, say - to the ultra-efficient Prius.

Similarly, a study last year by the National Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science in Japan estimated that 1 kilogram of beef, or 2.2 pounds, is responsible for the equivalent amount of carbon dioxide emitted by the average European car every 250 kilometers, or 155 miles, and burns enough energy to light a 100-watt bulb for nearly 20 days.

Grain, meat and even energy are roped together in a way that could have dire results. More meat means an increase in demand for feed, especially corn and soy, an increase some experts say will contribute to higher prices."

Dec 09 12 12:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gianantonio
Posts: 7,876
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


John Jebbia wrote:
For the past several weeks I've been seriously considering changing my diet. Not to really eat different things, but to eat better choices of the things I do eat.

I already got into the habit of buying meat at the butcher, produce at the farmer's market, dairy at an actual dairy, etc.. In other words, no Wal Mart or super market for most perishable items.

But now I'm looking into grass fed/free range beef. I found a place in Tucson that delivers to Phoenix, but you have to buy pretty much a whole quarter cow. I don't mind paying more, but still curiosity has me wondering what the approximate difference in price would be if I were to buy each item in the package individually at the supermarket.

Here's the package list ($600-$650 per order):
http://www.datecreekranch.com/ordering/ … ting-list/

Anyone care to give a rough estimate of the difference in cost?

See if any restaurants near you get local gf/fr beef.  Then find out where they get it from and see if they will deliver smaller quantities to that restaurant for you.  I did that with a local restaurant I'd actually never even gone to.  I contacted the producer (pork in my case) and they arranged for me to pick up at the restaurant.  I paid direct to the pork producer and just picked up a package at the restaurant.

Dec 09 12 12:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Blue Cube Imaging
Posts: 11,253
Ashland, Oregon, US


Find a local farmer (I know of one in Prescott) that supplies a butcher near you with Dexter beef.

The Dexter is a small cattle breed from Scotland that is being raised by sustainable farms and sold primarily through small specialty markets and butcher shops. We have a new butcher in town that is carrying it and the taste and texture is fantastic.
Dec 09 12 12:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


udor wrote:

Wow!!! How old ARE you, REALLY!!! yikes   tongue

57. That was from around 1970-73 in the very fertile Eel River valley, Humboldt County, CA, and the family mostly raised beef for itself and for some friends. They didn't have a large herd. The ranch had some grassy pastures and some alfalfa fields. The cattle got grain supplemental feed, baled alfalfa, and basic antibiotics but no growth hormones.

The cattle didn't run from place to place (I used to walk them from field to field), so the beef was lean (but tasty) but not stringy at all. Very tender and tasty.

They also kept a shitload of chickens, mostly for the eggs, but they also had no shortage of chickens to eat. The chickens weren't bloated steroid monsters, but they sure wuz good eatin'.

Dec 09 12 12:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
They also kept a shitload of chickens, mostly for the eggs, but they also had no shortage of chickens to eat. The chickens weren't bloated steroid monsters, but they sure wuz good eatin'.

Yeah... and this kind of idyll is still being used to sell frankenfood's steroid, hormone, antibiotic whitewashed monster meats, that's CO2 infused for fresh pink look...

I bet you were healthier, despite the meat, than today...

Dec 09 12 12:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Carlos Occidental wrote:
Grass had LITTLE FEED VALUE!

That's not quite correct. Grass is nutritious except for a lack of magnesium when the grass is young. Deal with that and grass is fine forage.

Cattle fed strictly on grass alone when it's new and tender can suffer from fatal "Grass Tetany." Grass is high in nitrogen (even moreso when the farm uses high-nitrogen fertilizers) and nitrogen affects magnesium levels.

Dec 09 12 01:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


udor wrote:

Yeah... and this kind of idyll is still being used to sell frankenfood's steroid, hormone, antibiotic whitewashed monster meats, that's CO2 infused for fresh pink look...

I bet you were healthier, despite the meat, than today...

Well, 57 vs 17. Yeah, I was healthier back then. Who isn't? What's your point?

Dec 09 12 01:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,546
Glendora, California, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
That's not quite correct. Grass is nutritious except for a lack of magnesium when the grass is young. Deal with that and grass is fine forage.

Cattle fed strictly on grass alone when it's new and tender can suffer from fatal "Grass Tetany." Grass is high in nitrogen (even moreso when the farm uses high-nitrogen fertilizers) and nitrogen affects magnesium levels.

Yeah, I did some research on that myself, but didn't want to apologize.  Grass is fine, if theres a LOT of it.
But, if you compare it to alfalfa and clover...

Dec 09 12 01:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:

Well, 57 vs 17. Yeah, I was healthier back then. Who isn't? What's your point?

The point is that even if you are a meat eater... if you were eating the meat of those days... you were overall in a better health, independent from age, because the food was more natural, your livestock was healthier and that translates into better building blocks for your cells and body.

What other point could I make???

Dec 09 12 01:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelli
Posts: 24,298
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


What I'm confused about is why you can only find ONE place to purchase it?

I've only had free range meat and wild fish for 2 yrs now and find it everywhere.

And there's A LOT more to it then them being fed corn or crap. The main problem is the hormones and anti-biotics. I wouldn't touch that for all the money in the world.
Dec 09 12 03:03 pm  Link  Quote 
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