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Model
DivaEroticus
Posts: 14,503
Fayetteville, Arkansas, US


Have any of the ladies here ever been to Curves?  If so, did you like it or not?  How much was it?  Did you find it effective?

I'm considering joining, as my Christmas present to myself.

If anyone has been, I'd appreciate your thoughts.
Dec 09 12 06:10 am  Link  Quote 
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Model
Koryn
Posts: 36,225
Boston, Massachusetts, US


The Curves program can be good for women who have never worked out before, or who are quite deconditioned. If you're in reasonably good shape just looking to lose weight, or need a lot of change, progression and physical stimulation to keep you interested, it might not be the greatest choice.

Depending on your needs, price-wise, you might end up with a better deal joining a nicer "sports club" and buying sessions with a trainer. Sure, it's an investment, but so is your body, and self-confidence, and sense of health and strength.

At least around here, Curves employees do not require certification. That's sketchy to me. Just my opinion, but I would not be eager to buy into a program that just throws you into contexts where people could potentially get injured, without some background education. I'm also skeptical of programs that try to sale based on the idea that women's bodies somehow need "special programming." The human muscular system is pretty much the same in both men and women, and taking into account adjustments for old injuries, and special needs people sometimes have, the same types of programs that help men get stronger and lose weight, also provide the same thing for women. It's nice to have the all-female environment, for people who prefer it, but be careful if someone offers you a "special workout just for women." It's a marketing gimmick. There's no such thing.

Many Curves are also going out of business currently, and getting bought out. They are struggling. I have a client who had to change gyms and trainers after the Curves she'd belonged to for a couple of years, just went out of business one day. That was a challenging transition for her, and she gained some weight back in the interim.

That being said, there are people who are successful at Curves, enjoy working out there, and find it beneficial. Some people just prefer to exercise with other women only, and that's fine and good.
Dec 09 12 07:01 am  Link  Quote 
Model
DivaEroticus
Posts: 14,503
Fayetteville, Arkansas, US


ShivaKitty wrote:
The Curves program can be good for women who have never worked out before, or who are quite deconditioned. If you're in reasonably good shape just looking to lose weight, or need a lot of change, progression and physical stimulation to keep you interested, it might not be the greatest choice.

Depending on your needs, price-wise, you might end up with a better deal joining a nicer "sports club" and buying sessions with a trainer. Sure, it's an investment, but so is your body, and self-confidence, and sense of health and strength.

At least around here, Curves employees do not require certification. That's sketchy to me. Just my opinion, but I would not be eager to buy into a program that just throws you into contexts where people could potentially get injured, without some background education. I'm also skeptical of programs that try to sale based on the idea that women's bodies somehow need "special programming." The human muscular system is pretty much the same in both men and women, and taking into account adjustments for old injuries, and special needs people sometimes have, the same types of programs that help men get stronger and lose weight, also provide the same thing for women. It's nice to have the all-female environment, for people who prefer it, but be careful if someone offers you a "special workout just for women." It's a marketing gimmick. There's no such thing.

Many Curves are also going out of business currently, and getting bought out. They are struggling. I have a client who had to change gyms and trainers after the Curves she'd belonged to for a couple of years, just went out of business one day. That was a challenging transition for her, and she gained some weight back in the interim.

That being said, there are people who are successful at Curves, enjoy working out there, and find it beneficial. Some people just prefer to exercise with other women only, and that's fine and good.

I wish you were closer to me...I'd hire you in an instant!

But I hear what you're saying about Curves.  They've been around here for as long as I have.  I didn't realize their "trainers" didn't require certification, though.  That's bothersome.  I'm not in as great a shape as I used to be, and the older I get, the harder it is to be where I want to be.

There's another gym not far from me that's decently priced, but I'll have to look into what their trainer situation is.  I really do need that one-on-one.  Then I also considered Zumba, because I love to dance, and I've got great rhythm, so that would be fun, and not considered "work."

It's just...since the whole issue with the asshole, I've been fairly sedentary.  I want to get back to where I was in 2006.

Dec 09 12 07:12 am  Link  Quote 
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Model
Koryn
Posts: 36,225
Boston, Massachusetts, US


DivaEroticus wrote:
I wish you were closer to me...I'd hire you in an instant!

But I hear what you're saying about Curves.  They've been around here for as long as I have.  I didn't realize their "trainers" didn't require certification, though.  That's bothersome.  I'm not in as great a shape as I used to be, and the older I get, the harder it is to be where I want to be.

There's another gym not far from me that's decently priced, but I'll have to look into what their trainer situation is.  I really do need that one-on-one.  Then I also considered Zumba, because I love to dance, and I've got great rhythm, so that would be fun, and not considered "work."

It's just...since the whole issue with the asshole, I've been fairly sedentary.  I want to get back to where I was in 2006.

Zumba is really popular right now, and the female clients I have all seem to love going to Zumba. I try to give people "homework" to do during the days between sessions, because it starts teaching them how to take personal responsibility for their fitness, so they won't necessarily be dependent on a trainer forever. In those situations, I say "Let's keep Zumba class as one of your cardio workouts this week," then make sure they have additional strength-training programming for that week they can do on their own.

Dancing is great. It was always one of my favorite ways to get cardiovascular stimulation, without feeling like you're exercising. I mentioned looking for a "sports club" gym atmosphere --- almost all of those facilities offer Zumba, as well as a range of other choreographed group classes you might enjoy, such as "step" and "body-sculpt." The gym where I work offers Zumba, Bellydance, "Caribbean Rhythm" and something called "Booiaka," which looks like mad fun. All those dance classes are included in the monthly membership, which costs something like $40/month for the regular members. So, relatively cheap. In other words, you don't have to join a Zumba studio, to get plenty of Zumba.

One of the biggest battles, it seems like, is getting people to enjoy exercising, and seeing it as a benefit, rather than something they hate and struggle through. Most regular Americans - especially women - just fuckin' hate it. It's easy to get them all invigorated and excited and having fun during the one-on-one session, but then you have to find something they will actually do on their own and enjoy, when you can't be around. For a lot of people right now, that's Zumba.

ANYTHING you will commit to and stay consistent with, is better than being sedentary. Just going to cardio dance classes will help a lot; it won't take care of all your long-term needs, forever, but it will give you something to start, and it can take you through that awkward first couple of months when you join a new facility and are not sure how you feel about it.

The fact is, 50% of people who join a health club, just stop going after 1 month. They continue to pay for it for months afterward, but if you don't find that *something* inside them, within the first few weeks, they go right back to being sedentary and hating themselves. That's just statistics. Sad, but true.

Dec 09 12 07:32 am  Link  Quote 
Model
DivaEroticus
Posts: 14,503
Fayetteville, Arkansas, US


ShivaKitty wrote:

Zumba is really popular right now, and the female clients I have all seem to love going to Zumba. I try to give people "homework" to do during the days between sessions, because it starts teaching them how to take personal responsibility for their fitness, so they won't necessarily be dependent on a trainer forever. In those situations, I say "Let's keep Zumba class as one of your cardio workouts this week," then make sure they have additional strength-training programming for that week they can do on their own.

Dancing is great. It was always one of my favorite ways to get cardiovascular stimulation, without feeling like you're exercising. I mentioned looking for a "sports club" gym atmosphere --- almost all of those facilities offer Zumba, as well as a range of other choreographed group classes you might enjoy, such as "step" and "body-sculpt." The gym where I work offers Zumba, Bellydance, "Caribbean Rhythm" and something called "Booiaka," which looks like mad fun. All those dance classes are included in the monthly membership, which costs something like $40/month for the regular members. So, relatively cheap. In other words, you don't have to join a Zumba studio, to get plenty of Zumba.

One of the biggest battles, it seems like, is getting people to enjoy exercising, and seeing it as a benefit, rather than something they hate and struggle through. Most regular Americans - especially women - just fuckin' hate it. It's easy to get them all invigorated and excited and having fun during the one-on-one session, but then you have to find something they will actually do on their own and enjoy, when you can't be around. For a lot of people right now, that's Zumba.

ANYTHING you will commit to and stay consistent with, is better than being sedentary. Just going to cardio dance classes will help a lot; it won't take care of all your long-term needs, forever, but it will give you something to start, and it can take you through that awkward first couple of months when you join a new facility and are not sure how you feel about it.

The fact is, 50% of people who join a health club, just stop going after 1 month. They continue to pay for it for months afterward, but if you don't find that *something* inside them, within the first few weeks, they go right back to being sedentary and hating themselves. That's just statistics. Sad, but true.

I don't think I'll have a problem, once I make it a habit.  I used to have a terrific walking program (2005-2006), and then just...stopped.  What I'm going after is making it (something) a habit again.  That's my reasoning behind a trainer.  It's someone who can help motivate me to start again.  I need a drill sargeant, or something...LOL.  I do like the idea of the dance classes, and I think they're offered at that other gym close to me.  I've got a friend who goes there, but he's a guy, and sort of...interested...

Dec 09 12 08:11 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PhillipM
Posts: 6,364
Martin, Tennessee, US


My studio is next door to one.  They seem to go through different owners often.  It's never packed either, but I'm in a small town where some think a good work out is to go to Walmart and gossip.
Dec 09 12 03:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Ronin_LLC
Posts: 2,012
Louisville, Kentucky, US


PhillipM wrote:
My studio is next door to one.  They seem to go through different owners often.  It's never packed either, but I'm in a small town where some think a good work out is to go to Walmart and gossip.

Agreed, around here they are billed as places where women are able to go work out with out having to worry about leering creepo men and not being judged, but everyone I have heard from who have held memberships there claim that the gyms are nothing more that political battle fields of high school bullshit.
The owners change hands quickly and fees are ridiculous even higher than the YMCA.

Personally if you women were more focused on getting massive pecs, huge biceps and rock hard abs you wouldn't spend all that time gossiping.(this is a joke btw for those on here with mental disorders whose brains can't recognize sarcasm and humor}

Dec 09 12 03:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
DivaEroticus
Posts: 14,503
Fayetteville, Arkansas, US


Ronin_LLC wrote:

Agreed, around here they are billed as places where women are able to go work out with out having to worry about leering creepo men and not being judged, but everyone I have heard from who have held memberships there claim that the gyms are nothing more that political battle fields of high school bullshit.
The owners change hands quickly and fees are ridiculous even higher than the YMCA.

Personally if you women were more focused on getting massive pecs, huge biceps and rock hard abs you wouldn't spend all that time gossiping.(this is a joke btw for those on here with mental disorders whose brains can't recognize sarcasm and humor}

I have never appreciated your sarcasm or your [attempt at] humor, and I don't have a mental disorder.

Dec 09 12 04:10 pm  Link  Quote 
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