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Clothing Designer
Wilde Hunt Corsetry
Posts: 343
Columbus, Ohio, US


I've read the FAQ for this forum, searched the forum, and also googled my question. But I'm curious about what people actually do vs. what is recommended. I've read that it is recommended to use a spatula and scrap off a bit of eyeshadow onto a palette rather than double dip your brush after touching the model's face. All the MUAs I've worked with just work directly from the eyeshadow and of course thoroughly clean the product before and after with alcohol. How risky is this? I'm asking because sometimes in an emergency when I can't get a MUA for a shoot, I have to step in and do the makeup myself and I just want to make sure I'm doing what's safe for the model. Do most of you scrape eye products onto a palette or with careful cleaning is it ok to work directly from the product?
Thanks for your expertise!
L.
Dec 11 12 12:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Hillary Scrogins
Posts: 11
Jacksonville, Florida, US


I always clean my brushes between clients and I clean the compact powders by spraying alcohol over them and letting it dry. Loose powders go onto a palette though, since there's no way to really clean those.
Dec 11 12 12:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
SD Makeup Artisty
Posts: 184
Hicksville, New York, US


Hillary Scrogins wrote:
I always clean my brushes between clients and I clean the compact powders by spraying alcohol over them and letting it dry. Loose powders go onto a palette though, since there's no way to really clean those.

+1

Dec 11 12 01:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Simire MUA
Posts: 91
London, England, United Kingdom


Hillary Scrogins wrote:
I always clean my brushes between clients and I clean the compact powders by spraying alcohol over them and letting it dry. Loose powders go onto a palette though, since there's no way to really clean those.

I do the same thing also.

Dec 11 12 01:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
AllisonLael
Posts: 704
Los Angeles, California, US


I just want to say THANK YOUUUUU for asking and making an effort to be sanitary. Its horrifying how many 'professional' makeup artist I've worked with who don't know or care.

I agree with whats said above, anytime I've had to do makeup I spray with alcohol before and after.
Dec 11 12 01:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Vanita MUA
Posts: 57
Seattle, Washington, US


I use beauty so clean, cleansing spray. Can use on all my powder products.
Dec 11 12 01:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Linda Chudomelova
Posts: 133
Prague, Prague, Czech Republic


Is there a specific reason why you guys spray right before application other than showing the client/talent that you're sanitizing? I always sanitize between clients, which sometimes means doing it on location, but more than often I just wrap everything I used separately and clean and sanitize at home.
Dec 11 12 01:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Wilde Hunt Corsetry
Posts: 343
Columbus, Ohio, US


Thanks for your input, guys! I appreciate it!
Dec 11 12 02:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Brittany Young MUA
Posts: 76
Atlanta, Georgia, US


I also spray alcohol on the compact powders and sanitize brushes between use but for loose powders I like to stick a powder puff into the top and shake the container and use the powder stuck to the powder puff. It's a lot easier for me seeing as I have horribly bad luck and tend to spill loose powders everywhere. I learned it from another mua and it has saved me some hugee headache.
Dec 11 12 05:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Merenda Morris
Posts: 45
Memphis, Tennessee, US


Vanita MUA wrote:
I use beauty so clean, cleansing spray. Can use on all my powder products.

+1

Using alcohol over your shadows and blushes can cause them to glaze over (which can be easily remedied by taking a clean spooly and scrubbing the top, but oh the product you lose!).

Dec 12 12 04:00 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Makeup Hair by Dani B
Posts: 729
Seattle, Washington, US


I've never seen anyone scrape dry, pressed shadow on a palette and then attempt to use it. That sounds nuts. Beauty So Clean spray or alcohol are what I see used and I use the former myself.
Dec 12 12 05:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
iva leah
Posts: 17
Brooklyn, New York, US


I assisted a very well known makeup artist, who told me that she doesn't sanitize her powders because bacteria can't live in them.

Does anyone have scientific evidence arguing against this?
Dec 12 12 06:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Elizabethmakeup
Posts: 338
Hereford, England, United Kingdom


iva leah wrote:
I assisted a very well known makeup artist, who told me that she doesn't sanitize her powders because bacteria can't live in them.

This is also what I have been told.

Dec 13 12 11:33 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Linda Chudomelova
Posts: 133
Prague, Prague, Czech Republic


Even if it couldn't live *in* the product, it could live *on* it and then transfer on the other person's face when you dip a brush into it. It's a surface, much like any other.
Dec 13 12 01:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Makeup by Aviva Leah
Posts: 113
Brooklyn, New York, US


I was also told that alcohol can break down / damage the product.
Dec 13 12 03:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
M N Hair and Makeup
Posts: 3
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


Elizabethmakeup wrote:

This is also what I have been told.

I was told this too when I did my training.

Dec 14 12 04:51 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Makeup by Aviva Leah
Posts: 113
Brooklyn, New York, US


I specifically asked if anyone had scientific evidence (articles from scientific journals, etc) disproving what I said I was told. I know that some people agree and some disagree. I intend to do more research so that there is something backing my techniques.

(whoops, different account, same person)
Dec 14 12 07:41 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Elizabethmakeup
Posts: 338
Hereford, England, United Kingdom


Aviva Leah wrote:
I was also told that alcohol can break down / damage the product.

General rule: 70% is used to sanitise, 90% and higher breaks down the makeup.

Dec 14 12 09:26 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lauren Reynolds Makeup
Posts: 282
London, England, United Kingdom


Aviva Leah wrote:
I specifically asked if anyone had scientific evidence (articles from scientific journals, etc) disproving what I said I was told. I know that some people agree and some disagree. I intend to do more research so that there is something backing my techniques.

(whoops, different account, same person)

I was told that bacteria can't live in powder products too (Elizabeth, did you go to LCF too?). It's hard to find any specific studies - however, logic dictates that if bacteria can live on a physically clean kitchen surface, it can live in eyeshadows. Probably less than lives in liquids and creams. Nothing is sterile unless it has just been sterilised (ie no makeup is ever sterile ever).

And there's alway going to be tiny traces of sebum in eyeshadows transferred from the brush that can support bacteria. Disinfecting the top is probably the best you can do to reduce the number smile

Dec 14 12 12:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Heather J M
Posts: 715
London, England, United Kingdom


I've spoken to my microbiologist friend about this to get a definitive answer for myself (obviously you can only take my word for it, so please do your own research!) and she has confirmed my long held belief that bacteria and mould require moisture to grow, and that viruses require a host cell to replicate so the chances of either being present in eyeshadow are negligible.

I pour tiny amounts of liquids onto my stainless steel palette, I scrape from creams and gels and loose powders get puffed onto a tissue. Other powders get either a powder puff (clean for each individual) or a brush (again, cleaned between people) directly into them and I am not about to shell out for glorified IPA in a bottle. At a certain point of hygiene you have to stop. As pointed out above, nothing we do is or can be sterile. But then, we are not surgeons, and we should never ever be working on a client with a known infection or open wound, and extra care must be taken around all mucus membranes. After that, it is helpful to recognise that people encounter more bacteria on the door handle than they will from me.

Another point in this argument for me is that some people don't use bactericidal agents in cleaning their brushes. I clean mine in IPA for this reason.
Dec 14 12 01:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Elizabethmakeup
Posts: 338
Hereford, England, United Kingdom


Lauren Reynolds MUA wrote:
(Elizabeth, did you go to LCF too?)

Vancouver Film School.

Dec 15 12 01:47 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
LC Makeup and Styling
Posts: 90
Perth, Western Australia, Australia


I use a spritzer of alcohol over my eyeshadows, compact powders and foundations
Dec 15 12 03:38 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Wilde Hunt Corsetry
Posts: 343
Columbus, Ohio, US


I don't have any evidence to back this up so this is just conjecture, but I would think that oils and moisture from the face could be transfered in to the product so I think you would still need to spray things down with alcohol or beauty so clean. I mean, even if theoretically nothing could grow in powder, it's not just powder after you have contact with someone's face.
Dec 15 12 04:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
make-upbynatalie
Posts: 51
Southampton, England, United Kingdom


I use beauty so clean on my eyeshadows etc
Dec 23 12 01:55 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Tegan Lynn MUA
Posts: 511
Kitchener, Ontario, Canada


To me, spraying down my powder products or not depends on one fact. How much time do I have between clients? As has been discussed above, a vast majority of bacteria, moulds, and viruses can't live or reproduce in powder environments. As has also been discussed above, all sorts of lovely junk can still get transferred to the product. Most of these bugs can't survive longer than 48 hours (usually much less) outside the human body (with the exception of mould spores... but IPA can't kill most of them so it's a moot point). So here's my thinking on the matter.

If I have less than 72 hours between clients, I spray them down because some superbug could still be clinging to life down there. If I have longer than 72 hours between clients (I'm still very early on in my career so most of the time I have much more than that) I don't worry about it. Anything that can live in such a harsh environment for that long is most likely going to survive a spritz of IPA. I took enough of this stuff in university to feel confident in my practices.

I always clean my brushes after every client with brush cleaner, and then give them a quick soak in IPA to kill off whatever  is left.

Healthy human skin is very good at keeping bugs out, and you shouldn't be applying makeup to damaged or raw skin anyway.
Dec 23 12 07:18 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Makeup Artist
KJB
Posts: 1,183
New York, New York, US


DO NOT...I repeat DO NOT spray alcohol on your pressed powder products (eyeshadow, blush, etc.). It will break down the wax/oil that binds them and irrevocably change the texture and performance.
Bacteria requires a warm, moist environment to live and propagate. If you're overtly germ-phobic and don't choose to believe this, simply put your powder products in the freezer for 10-15 to kill ANY possible bacteria.
Dec 23 12 03:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Elizabethmakeup
Posts: 338
Hereford, England, United Kingdom


MADE NYC wrote:
DO NOT...I repeat DO NOT spray alcohol on your pressed powder products (eyeshadow, blush, etc.). It will break down the wax/oil that binds them and irrevocably change the texture and performance.
Bacteria requires a warm, moist environment to live and propagate. If you're overtly germ-phobic and don't choose to believe this, simply put your powder products in the freezer for 10-15 to kill ANY possible bacteria.

Yay, so I can carry on as I am. Good to know.

Dec 24 12 12:40 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
NatalieB MUA
Posts: 1
Orlando, Florida, US


I sanitize before a job and I also ensure that my client KNOWS I'm sanitizing the products, so I will do a quick wipe (that yucky unknown layer) from the tops of the powders, or a quick spray of alcohol on lipsticks/etc before scraping off the product onto my palette. I sanitize my hands CONSTANTLY and even offer my client sanitizer if I notice they didn't see me do it!
Dec 26 12 07:53 pm  Link  Quote 
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