login info join!
Forums > Off-Topic Discussion > My opinion on Pit Bulls has changed for the better Search   Reply
12345last
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


After doing this shoot with Nicolette, I have a soft spot in my heart for Pit Bulls, aka "Assault Dogs":

http://www.richardsfault.com/2012/12.14 … index.html
Dec 25 12 09:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,603
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Really there are no bad dogs, just irresponsible owners.

You can train any dog to be a loving family pet given time and patience.
Dec 25 12 10:02 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Model Sarah
Posts: 38,856
Columbus, Ohio, US


http://i.imgur.com/Mnv3U.jpg
Dec 25 12 10:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan K Photography
Posts: 5,409
STATEN ISLAND, New York, US


pits are evil

http://dknafo.smugmug.com/photos/i-fW6trLt/0/M/i-fW6trLt-M.jpg
Dec 25 12 10:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Nemeth
Posts: 27,204
Dearborn, Michigan, US


Virtual Studio wrote:
Really there are no bad dogs, just irresponsible owners.

You can train any dog to be a loving family pet given time and patience.

There has been some bad breeding of Pitt Bulls which has caused problems.

Dec 25 12 10:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lohkee
Posts: 12,157
Maricopa, Arizona, US


Model Sarah wrote:
http://i.imgur.com/Mnv3U.jpg

There is something strangely unnerving about this image lol

Dec 25 12 10:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 36,276
Columbus, Ohio, US


Lohkee wrote:

There is something strangely unnerving about this image lol

You're probably afraid he is gonna hump your leg.

Dec 25 12 10:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Nemeth
Posts: 27,204
Dearborn, Michigan, US


http://www.pitbullsontheweb.com/petbull/graphic/petehomeimage.jpg
Dec 25 12 10:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,603
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Jerry Nemeth wrote:

There has been some bad breeding of Pitt Bulls which has caused problems.

Yes - but you can largely negate this with proper training.

I own an "evil" dog myself. Rottweiler / King Shepherd cross who tends not to back down in confrontations with other dogs - however it's all a question of him knowing boundaries and who is boss.

The family Staffordshire Bull Terrier was much the same.

Dec 25 12 10:13 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Abigail Rose Hill
Posts: 538
Newcastle upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom


Every dog brought into this planet has the potential to either be a loving pet, successful working dog or a danger to society in the wrong hands.

The key is understanding the breed you are taking on, doing your homework and taking the time to train them properly. I own two Whippets (scaled-down greyhounds for those not breed-savvy), and both are incredibly loving dogs. However, their breed traits include a fiercely high prey drive, so they're not let off the lead in built up areas in case there's cats, and are only allowed to socialise and play with dogs they've been properly introduced to. The latter is largely to do with the eldest dog suffering what's known as "fear aggression" (he was attacked 3 times as a puppy so is now terrified of other dogs running up to him when he can't run away, and his defence mechanism is to snap and woof), but it's also because if they start running round a field with a much smaller dog, the small chance is always there that they mistake it for their next meal.

Common sense people. That's all. Oh, and lots of cuddles.
Dec 25 12 10:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,603
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Abi Hill wrote:
Every dog brought into this planet has the potential to either be a loving pet, successful working dog or a danger to society in the wrong hands.

The key is understanding the breed you are taking on, doing your homework and taking the time to train them properly. I own two Whippets (scaled-down greyhounds for those not breed-savvy), and both are incredibly loving dogs. However, their breed traits include a fiercely high prey drive, so they're not let off the lead in built up areas in case there's cats, and are only allowed to socialise and play with dogs they've been properly introduced to. The latter is largely to do with the eldest dog suffering what's known as "fear aggression" (he was attacked 3 times as a puppy so is now terrified of other dogs running up to him when he can't run away, and his defence mechanism is to snap and woof), but it's also because if they start running round a field with a much smaller dog, the small chance is always there that they mistake it for their next meal.

Common sense people. That's all. Oh, and lots of cuddles.

Whippet bit my dog in the dog park then ran off. The poor owner was freaking about what would happen if Asbo (my dog) caught him while I was doubled up with laughter watching my poor pup run into a state of (happy) exhaustion. Funniest thing I've seen in a long time - poor Asbo just didn't have a chance/

Dec 25 12 10:22 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Model Sarah
Posts: 38,856
Columbus, Ohio, US


Lohkee wrote:

There is something strangely unnerving about this image lol

Mr. Worldwide! big_smile

Dec 25 12 10:28 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Koryn
Posts: 36,184
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Virtual Studio wrote:
I own an "evil" dog myself. Rottweiler / King Shepherd cross ....

I bet he's beautiful.

Dec 25 12 10:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


Lohkee wrote:
There is something strangely unnerving about this image lol

I was thinking "Invasion of the Body Snatchers".

Dec 25 12 10:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Salo
Posts: 8,145
Olney, Maryland, US


A dog is a dog.  Most dogs are social creatures although there are occasional psychos.

In my experience, bad dogs usually have been trained to behave that way.
Dec 25 12 12:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GCobb Photography
Posts: 15,891
Southaven, Mississippi, US


Virtual Studio wrote:
Really there are no bad dogs, just irresponsible owners.

You can train any dog to be a loving family pet given time and patience.

Agreed.  I've seen mini-pinchers that looked like they'd tear me apart faster than a Pitt.  I've seen Pitts that would almost lick you to death.  And I've seen them where they'd bark pretty bad for a few minutes then calm down.

Blame the owners.

Dec 25 12 12:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lovely Day Media
Posts: 3,988
Vineland, New Jersey, US


My last dog was a pit bull.  She was very territorial but also fiercely loyal to me.  I let her outside off her leash once and she left the yard.  She didn't go far, but she left.  When she got back, I smacked her for it.  She never left the yard again unless she was on her leash and I was with her.  Even if my mother was dog sitting for me, she wouldn't leave the yard with her, either.

  I thought mine was heavy.  The dog in your pictures looks like he's at least 50 pounds heavier. smile  Great looking dog, though.  I'll get another one eventually.
Dec 25 12 12:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lovely Day Media
Posts: 3,988
Vineland, New Jersey, US


GCobb Photography wrote:
Agreed.  I've seen mini-pinchers that looked like they'd tear me apart faster than a Pitt.  I've seen Pitts that would almost lick you to death.  And I've seen them where they'd bark pretty bad for a few minutes then calm down.

Blame the owners.

In my younger years, I delivered pizza.  I went to a house where the owners had a pit bull and a poodle.  The pit tried to dog hair me to death.  The poodle tried to eat me.  Go figure.

Dec 25 12 12:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dannielle Levan
Posts: 12,857
New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada


Virtual Studio wrote:
Really there are no bad dogs, just irresponsible owners.

You can train any dog to be a loving family pet given time and patience.

Dec 25 12 01:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Little Queenie
Posts: 6,213
Indio, California, US


I love my pit mix. He's a bit of a looney toon but he is so great with us.

Poor dude is in boarding for the first time. Can't wait to go pick him up tomorrow.
Dec 25 12 01:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rick Dupuis Photography
Posts: 6,822
Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada


Good for you. It's awesome when one dog can be an ambassador that changes the opinion of an entire breed. I'm glad you met that one :-)
I am on my third Doberman and I've had two rottweilers. I rescued a pitbull (Amstaff) and gave him to a good home.
Pitbulls, rottweilers, Doberman pinschers, German shepherds, they all have one thing in common: they're just dogs. How they turn out is completely up to their upbringing.I've seen pits that are cupcakes and  beagles that are mean. It almost always reflects on the people they live with.
I love the pit-type dogs. haven't met one I don't like.
Dec 25 12 02:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,540
Salinas, California, US


rp_photo wrote:
After doing this shoot with Nicolette, I have a soft spot in my heart for Pit Bulls, aka "Assault Dogs":

http://www.richardsfault.com/2012/12.14 … index.html

Glad your opinion of pit bulls has changed!  Some great pictures there! 


I've had many dogs, and I love all dogs regardless of breed. 
It is true that it's the owner, not the dog that is bad. 

I've got a really good friend who is a professional dog trainer
and shows her Bull Mastiffs at AKC shows. 
In case you don't know, they are huge dogs!  Look pretty http://assets.modelmayhem.com/images/smilies/scary.pngif
you don't know that they are inclined to LOVE you to death!

Here are some great pictures of her with her dogs; 

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/121226/16/50db955942358.jpg

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/121226/16/50db952dc38ba.jpg

I wish I had shot those, but I didn't.


From her profile, I believe the photographer is George Retelas Photography
who also shot this one of my friend ....

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/558939_10151059394264724_1547211495_n.jpg

I sure wish I lived close to Elena because she is gorgeous! I'd be shooting with her and her dogs every day if I could!!

Look in those eyes!  No doubt that she can tame the savage beast!

Dec 25 12 02:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Raoul Isidro Images
Posts: 6,080
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


....???

Why zero in on Pitt Bulls and their breeds?

That's unfair!

Let's be gracious and include others as well!

There are no bad Cobras*... only irresponsible Cobra handlers.

*replace word with appropriate choice:

- Scorpions
- Tarantulas
- Crocodiles
- Killer Bees
- etc.

After doing a photo shoot with these guys, maybe your opinions about them will change...

.
Dec 25 12 05:13 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
-JAY-
Posts: 6,415
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Raoul Isidro Images wrote:
....???

Why zero in on Pitt Bulls and their breeds?

That's unfair!

Let's be gracious and include others as well!

There are no bad Cobras*... only irresponsible Cobra handlers.

*replace word with appropriate choice:

- Scorpions
- Tarantulas
- Crocodiles
- Killer Bees
- etc.

.

I'm sorry... I'm confused. When was the last time you saw a domesticated Killer Bee?

Dec 25 12 05:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Raoul Isidro Images
Posts: 6,080
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


-JAY- wrote:

I'm sorry... I'm confused. When was the last time you saw a domesticated Killer Bee?

Most probably in the very near future. Someone will do it.
It is coming to the state where you live:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b2/Killerbees_ani.gif
Spread of Killer Bees in the US

Dec 25 12 05:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ArtisticPhotography
Posts: 7,699
Buffalo, New York, US


Virtual Studio wrote:
Really there are no bad dogsgang members, just irresponsible ownersgangs.

You can train any dogAK-47-toting gang member to be a loving family petfamily man given time and patience.

Dec 25 12 05:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ArtisticPhotography
Posts: 7,699
Buffalo, New York, US


Jerry Nemeth wrote:

There has been some bad breeding of Pitt Bullsgang members which has caused problems.

Dec 25 12 05:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ArtisticPhotography
Posts: 7,699
Buffalo, New York, US


Mark Salo wrote:
A dogperson is a dogperson.  Most dogspeople are social creatures although there are occasional psychos.

In my experience, bad dogspeople usually have been trained to behave that way.

Dec 25 12 05:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,603
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


ArtisticPhotography wrote:

Of course.

Dogs are just easier to train using Pavlovian conditioning.

Dec 25 12 06:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,540
Salinas, California, US


Raoul Isidro Images wrote:
....???

Why zero in on Pitt Bulls and their breeds?

That's unfair!

Let's be gracious and include others as well!

There are no bad Cobras*... only irresponsible Cobra handlers.

*replace word with appropriate choice:

- Scorpions
- Tarantulas
- Crocodiles
- Killer Bees
- etc.

After doing a photo shoot with these guys, maybe your opinions about them will change...

.

WTF????   Excuse me, but you sure know how to hijack a thread!!!!

There is no comparison to ownership of dogs and cats as pets vs. exotics as pets.
The difference in numbers is staggering! 

Go to this page, please! http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/pet … stics.html

Look at this website too, please!  http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/resource … states.htm

Do you understand that the number of people who keep digs and cats
by far out numbers those who keep exotic pets?  Although it's rare that
the exotic animals you listed are kept as pets (I've dealt with snakes
and tarantulas before and have no problem with them) many of the even
more exotic animals require a permit or license to keep.  But killer bees?
And cobras?  Where do they have anything to do with this topic?

My point being that dogs can be trained, where as the ownership of exotics
is not the same thing.  Maybe you have had a bad experience with some animals?

Dec 25 12 06:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rick Dupuis Photography
Posts: 6,822
Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada


Raoul Isidro Images wrote:
....???

Why zero in on Pitt Bulls and their breeds?

That's unfair!

Let's be gracious and include others as well!

There are no bad Cobras*... only irresponsible Cobra handlers.

*replace word with appropriate choice:

- Scorpions
- Tarantulas
- Crocodiles
- Killer Bees
- etc.

After doing a photo shoot with these guys, maybe your opinions about them will change...

.

Maybe this was a joke. Kinda hope so.
There is a huge difference here. Dogs are like kids.... none are born mean. Oh there are the occasional one that's born without empathy but for the vast majority, if you want a kid or a dog to be mean, you need to teach it to them. But the animals you listed... God....
Scorpions, obviously because people keep them and handle them all the time, they aren't all mean, but no matter how you look at it, they do not have thousands of years of domestication behind them so they are unpredictable.
Tarantulas are spiders. They will not love you back. No matter how many time you say "Don't bite me again," they will not get that. They don't understand. Your dog may look at you like you're an idiot sometimes, but at least for the most part he understands what you're trying to tell him. A spider is a spider.
Crocodiles.... Really? You really think making a movie about or with a crocodile or alligator will give you a better perspective on them? I got a better perspective on them by watching Animal Planet and Nat Geo. I like them. I think they should be protected. IN THE WILD. I remember seeing an old Far Side cartoon. An old couple were out fishing and a huge croc grabbed the man. The wife yells "Rub his belly! Rub his belly! Yeah, that won't work.
Killer bees... do you know what a killer bee is? Its just a honey bee with a f*&^ing temper. They are basically the same bee but the killer be has a short fuse and they swarm. No, they are not likely to be friendly.
All of these are the basic reasons why when film makers decide to make a thriller, they use real actors and  CG animals.... and why dogs are usually real in the movie.
When Steven Spielberg was a 26 year old director and he agreed to make Jaws, he assumed he could hire someone to train a great white shark and get the movie made quickly. He actually said that. He also said that was about the dumbest idea he ever had.
You cannot compare a dog, any dog, to a wild animal. I absolutely love animals and jump at the chance to work with almost all of them. I feel it is an honor and privilege to come into an animal's life. I think that any dog and I can become friends. I do not think I could sit here and watch tv with a crocodile on my lap.

Dec 26 12 05:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


Note that I never had a bad opinion of Pit Bulls, but this experience has warmed me up to them even more.

Being both a photographer and a gun owner, I have experienced the feelings of being "outcast", which in many ways makes me sympathetic.
Dec 26 12 06:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


-JAY- wrote:
I'm sorry... I'm confused. When was the last time you saw a domesticated Killer Bee?

I believe they were orginally domestic bees from South America better adapted to local conditions.

I also believe the whole killer bee thing was mostly media hysteria, brought to you by the same media that also decries the loss of bee populations.

Dec 26 12 06:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
In Balance Photography
Posts: 3,370
Boston, Massachusetts, US


rp_photo wrote:
Note that I never had a bad opinion of Pit Bulls, but this experience has warmed me up to them even more.

Being both a photographer and a gun owner, I have experienced the feelings of being "outcast", which in many ways makes me sympathetic.

How is being an outcast related to being a gun owner and photographer?

Dec 26 12 06:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


In Balance Photography wrote:

How is being an outcast related to being a gun owner and photographer?

For gun owners it's obvious, especially given the predictable exploitation recent and past tragedies.

As far photographers, unless they are blessed with studio space or private land, they've dealt with being treated as an outcast.

Dec 26 12 06:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
In Balance Photography
Posts: 3,370
Boston, Massachusetts, US


rp_photo wrote:

For gun owners it's obvious, especially given the predictable exploitation recent and past tragedies.

As far photographers, unless they are blessed with studio space or private land, they've dealt with being treated as an outcast.

What's your definition of an outcast?

Dec 26 12 06:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
K E E L I N G
Posts: 39,776
Peoria, Illinois, US


rp_photo wrote:

For gun owners it's obvious, especially given the predictable exploitation recent and past tragedies.

As far photographers, unless they are blessed with studio space or private land, they've dealt with being treated as an outcast.

If you don't like being an outcast about guns, there's a simple solution... stop telling people you are a gun owner.  They'll never know unless you tell them.  Unless you seek the drama that is, then the obvious solution is stop complaining about being an outcast.

As far as being a photographer, my experience has been much different from yours, I find being a photographer has increased my social experience in a positive way.

Dec 26 12 06:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


In Balance Photography wrote:
What's your definition of an outcast?

Someone viewed with suspicion by certain segments of the public for their activities, threatened with regulations, and potentially subject to personal harassment or improper legal prosecution.

K E E L I N G wrote:
As far as being a photographer, my experience has been much different from yours, I find being a photographer has increased my social experience in a positive way.

Same here as far as peers and friends in the industry and some others who appreciate my work. However, it can not be counted on to win friends at large.

K E E L I N G wrote:
If you don't like being an outcast about guns, there's a simple solution... stop telling people you are a gun owner.  They'll never know unless you tell them.  Unless you seek the drama that is, then the obvious solution is stop complaining about being an outcast.

Unlike photographers, gun owners tend to be vocal about their interest and actively stand up for each other. They also face a more serious opposition than photographers, to the point where being quiet can do more harm than good.

Dec 26 12 06:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
K E E L I N G
Posts: 39,776
Peoria, Illinois, US


rp_photo wrote:
Unlike photographers, gun owners tend to be vocal about their interest and actively stand up for each other. They also face a more serious opposition than photographers, to the point where being quiet can do more harm than good.

How so?  How can you be harmed by someone for something they don't know about?

Dec 26 12 06:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
In Balance Photography
Posts: 3,370
Boston, Massachusetts, US


rp_photo wrote:

In Balance Photography wrote:
What's your definition of an outcast?

Someone viewed with suspicion by certain segments of the public for their activities, threatened with regulations, and potentially subject to personal harassment or improper legal prosecution.


Same here as far as peers and friends in the industry and some others who appreciate my work.

We live in a big country. There's always a group of people that's going to not like what an individual may do.

For example, I used to like to go fishing at the point on Cape Hatteras. To get there, it's a long walk, or 4x4.

There's a group of people that are trying to save piping plovers, and they really dislike that people drive 4x4 vehicles there, because on occasion some idiot will run over one of the nests.

So they have been trying to get more regulations, stiffer penalties etc. Fencing had been put up, that depending on the tides, could cut off access to the point. In fact, if one was careless, one could be put in the position of running over the fence or having one's vehicle consumed by the surf.

Some people hate that I would 4x4 out to the point.
They try to regulate it.
I could be subject to improper prosecution.
I could be subject to personal harassment.

Does that make me an outcast?

Not by a long shot.

I still can vote. I still have rights protected by the bill of rights. I still have friends and family. I have access to health care and a home and a job and transportation.

Maybe being an outcast is a function of personal perspective?

Dec 26 12 06:56 am  Link  Quote 
12345last   Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers