login info join!
Forums > Photography Talk > Teaching Photography Search   Reply
12last
Photographer
ELiffmann
Posts: 1,376
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, US


Hi Folks,
  I've been approached by someone about giving their daughter photography lessons.  Can anybody recommend a not-to-heavy book to teach out of?  Any other resources?  The girl is 13 or 14 by the way.  I'm kind of leaning toward having her get an old Nikon Ai/Ais and having her only shoot in manual for a bit.  I figure actually seeing the aperture blades open and close might be helpful, as well as learning the stops.  Any thoughts or advice would be appreciated.
Dec 29 12 09:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
The Effective Image
Posts: 3,910
Lansing, Michigan, US


I don't know that teaching her on a film camera is the way to go... She'll wind up using a digital anyway.

Just my opinion.
Dec 29 12 09:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Images by MR
Posts: 7,295
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


I like the book... the new manual of photography by john hedgecoe
Dec 29 12 09:58 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
-JAY-
Posts: 5,830
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


I bought my 12 year old sister "understanding exposure" for christmas and she's loving it.
Dec 29 12 10:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Image Works Photography
Posts: 2,890
Orlando, Florida, US


Sometimes you make me laugh http://i1353.photobucket.com/albums/q665/B_Paulsen/Happy%20Faces/zohsnapsmilley-2_zps2f8a3872.gif
Dec 29 12 10:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Shot By Adam
Posts: 5,197
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


-JAY- wrote:
I bought my 12 year old sister "understanding exposure" for christmas and she's loving it.

This really is an excellent book for beginners. It should definitely be on your suggested reading list if you teach a class.

For the classes I teach, I just created my own training materials. Truly, this is the best way to go. This way you're not teaching someone elses' class, you're teaching YOUR class.

Dec 29 12 10:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,075
Salem, Oregon, US


i think it's a lot about learning to be one with your camera. so it might be better to teach her on the camera she plans to use for a while (if she has a camera yet). i have trouble just switching between my 5D MK I and MK II not to mention over to our fuji x-pro1.

i might start someone out with Av mode (assuming they aren't using flash). and if the camera can float ISO with a safety shift on the shutter speed even better. it's not wrong to let the camera do at least some of the work.

really i think it's about teaching them to see what the camera recommends (assuming they are using a partial auto mode like Av or even P mode) and then knowing if that's ok or if they have to adjust the settings.

i've found that getting good at manual really takes a lot of practice and experience and there are times when Av is a much wiser way to shoot.

and then of course there's flash which is a whole course all by itself.

understanding exposure is a book commonly used for teaching.

to me the big problem for newbies is blurry photos. they need to understand all the ways to avoid having blurry photos. once they understand how to get sharp photos (assuming they have adequate gear to achieve that indoors) then they can start playing around with shallow DOF and slower shutter speeds. what you usually see is someone trying to do family shots in front of the xmas tree at night practically in the dark -- they don't understand that's a tough situation for the camera (that's where having my x-pro1 at f1.4 and ISO 6400 comes in handy).
Dec 29 12 10:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ELiffmann
Posts: 1,376
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, US


The Effective Image wrote:
I don't know that teaching her on a film camera is the way to go... She'll wind up using a digital anyway.

Just my opinion.

Not a film camera, just the "film" lens.  I was thinking a D40,50 etc... Thanks for the tips guys.

Dec 29 12 10:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bill Sylvester
Posts: 1,463
Cincinnati, Ohio, US


ELiffmann wrote:

Not a film camera, just the "film" lens.  I was thinking a D40,50 etc... Thanks for the tips guys.

Focusing might be a bit difficult without a split screen or micro-prism. And will those cameras meter couple with AI or AI-S lenses? I don't think they will.

Dec 29 12 11:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
photo212grapher
Posts: 1,529
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


Skip the book. Have her "write" the book by giving assignments that force her to varying the f-stop and see the depth of field differences, vary the shutter speed and see motion "freeze", vary the focal length to see compression of subject and background.

Teaching the technical side is simple. Teaching the artistry side takes great art teaching talent and a great art learner. For the rest of us, there are simple rules to follow or break.

But none of that will be fun for her. That's old schooling. See if she really has the interest. Take her out to photograph various things. You both to be armed with similar cameras and lenses. You spot something to photograph, and you both explore the subject. Rinse, repeat, for a long walk in the park. Then compare the results. Hopefully, yours will be the better images. Describe why. Then return to the field for the how.

Find out what her passion is for holding the camera. People, pets, wildlife, landscapes, whatever. Make that the central theme, but explore beyond that.

Skip the film cameras. If you plan on teaching darkroom, film is the choice; otherwise, digital and photoshop is what the next generation will be using. Let's face it, the days of forcing someone to walk across the room to change TV channels is over. We all look for the remote.
Dec 30 12 07:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,138
Duluth, Georgia, US


I would use the Photographic Eye: Learning to See With a Camera, and you can download a PDF version at

http://www.mediafire.com/?moikwtzqon3
Dec 30 12 07:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
L Cowles Photography
Posts: 810
Corona, California, US


The Effective Image wrote:
I don't know that teaching her on a film camera is the way to go... She'll wind up using a digital anyway.

Just my opinion.

I would agree.  Having taught photography to groups and individuals, I find most want to learn how to improve the looks of their images and don't really care about all the technical stuff.  If you were teaching someone how to drive a car, you probably wouldn't start off with an old stick shift car with a crank up engine, you would start with the car they had or were going to use.

I find you keep the persons interest more with showing them tips on composition, framing, etc where they can see immediate improvement in their images.  You can then have converstations on basic technical stuff as how the camera works and importance of aperature/shutter speed.

If you start off too technical, you loose their interest.

Dec 30 12 08:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
925 image
Posts: 272
Martinez, California, US


-JAY- wrote:
I bought my 12 year old sister "understanding exposure" for christmas and she's loving it.

+1

Dec 30 12 08:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Sellberg
Posts: 139
Bloomington, Illinois, US


L Cowles Photography wrote:

I would agree.  Having taught photography to groups and individuals, I find most want to learn how to improve the looks of their images and don't really care about all the technical stuff.  If you were teaching someone how to drive a car, you probably wouldn't start off with an old stick shift car with a crank up engine, you would start with the car they had or were going to use.

I find you keep the persons interest more with showing them tips on composition, framing, etc where they can see immediate improvement in their images.  You can then have converstations on basic technical stuff as how the camera works and importance of aperature/shutter speed.

If you start off too technical, you loose their interest.

I would agree with this especially because of her age. Through simple conversation you should be able to determine which directions she intends to take, however make sure to introduce other genres. I've learned the old saying "you don't know until you try" rings true almost every time. I enjoy portrait sessions, but my love is landscape/nature. Make sure you introduce the technical information in a demonstration(field) setting instead of a classroom setting this will add the hands-on necessary to keep interest in it. I remember nearly falling to sleep in college while the instructor went over all the technical details of why, it wasn't until we were shooting and it was demonstrated that it really clicked for me. Of course a lot of trial and error and reading since then has proven to be the best education yet.

Dec 30 12 11:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art by Scott Meyer
Posts: 397
Cincinnati, Ohio, US


Personally I would teach her on a 35mm camera using slide film. Best way to teach someone how to expose there film properly.
Dec 30 12 11:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Laura Dark Photography
Posts: 6,792
Columbus, Ohio, US


Art by Scott Meyer wrote:
Personally I would teach her on a 35mm camera using slide film. Best way to teach someone how to expose there film properly.

Agreed.  Fully manual Nikon F with a Photomic Finder was where I started.  Throw a kid on one of those with slide film and let them go!  LOL

Dec 30 12 11:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 14,699
Orlando, Florida, US


I second the "forget the book" idea.

Teach by doing.
Learn by doing.

Have her find images she likes and then teach her how to accomplish them WHILE explaining why you're doig what you're doing.

Reading a book is nice, but it doesn't always translate to good images. And isn't that the goal?
Dec 30 12 11:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kaouthia
Posts: 3,152
Lancaster, England, United Kingdom


^^ What he said. smile
Dec 30 12 11:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
fullmetalphotographer
Posts: 2,536
Fresno, California, US


I wouldn't put a manual lens on a DSLR for teaching purposes. I would do is take a piece of gaffer tape on the back of the LCD so there is no immediate feedback so there is no chimping. I would also have them expose manually using the camera meter or a handheld meter. So they understand the relationship of ISO, f/stops and shutter speeds.
Dec 30 12 03:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Untitled Photographer
Posts: 1,173
Dallas, Texas, US


I'm glad for the book recommendations, and I wonder about those who discourage reading as a tool for learning.  How positively weird is all I can say.   

Anyhow, I have a 12 yo friend (my friend's daughter) who shows amazing promise with her photography and I was wanting to get a book for her so this thread is perfect timing for my own interests.  I'm going to get her a copy of Understanding Exposure.

Thanks for the thread, OP, and thanks to those who replied with relevant suggestions.
Dec 30 12 03:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPS4 Photography
Posts: 14
Belmont, North Carolina, US


cambridgeincolour dot com is an excellent online resource that teaches everything a newbie would need to know from a basic standpoint, just my two cents.
Dec 30 12 03:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kincaid Blackwood
Posts: 23,236
Atlanta, Georgia, US


You guys who are saying not to recommend the girl a book are killing me. 

There are plenty of print (book) resources that are invaluable in terms of consulting and reading up.  A strategically selected/recommended boom is a resource to which she could repeatedly refer for a number of years.  I'd swear that some of you pretend that you don't read anything more than your own posts. 

This does not mean she won't be given assignments or whatever but have an instructor presumes a number of things.  First that he knows how to instruct.  Second, that the instructor knows and ensures that the pupil knows that learning continues after the session is over.  In fact, it has just begun after the session is over and if you were giving weekly lessons to a student, you'd want that student to have a reading resource to which she can go when there are concerns and questions. 

Why?

Because that promotes a “seek-the-answers-and-figure-out-solutions” approach.  Instead of the “When I get stumped, I'll just ask my instructor.” approach. 

Have things which she should practice on a regular basis as well as new things to try each week.  A book resource will help her with that.  Refine your craft, explore your art.  To refine the craft, there are nuts and bolts things which will immediately improve your ability to get the kinds of pictures you envision.  And as you do those things, you refine your art too.  A good book to begin with in terms of craft is anything beginners exposure book.  Some have been suggested here.  When regarding exploration of the creative side, give her photographers to look at as inspiration, maybe some books she can thumb through at Barnes & Noble or somesuch. 

For all those other hours she'll be shooting, she's bound to have questions or whatever.  A book is a good thing to have on hand.
Dec 30 12 05:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MarcMarayag
Posts: 77
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


tell her to watch digitalrev on youtube big_smile
Dec 30 12 05:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,122
Upland, California, US


Teaching Photography

Teaching isn't actually something I set out to accomplish at SM studio shoots (Dec 22nd Christmas Studio Partyshoot as an example)... but with half a dozen different shooting configurations and so many strobeheads and power supplies being used... there was alot of instuction dished out to assist photographers in achieving some flattering results.  The multiple lighting setup, posing stool and background selection used in this image of Alexandra that Myke captured on Dec 22nd was all setup by me, before Myke or Alexandra arrived.

http://www.mykesphotos.com/2012/december/alexandra_kaye_red_01.jpg
Dec 30 12 05:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Hair Stylist
Platform Artist
Posts: 157
Chicago, Illinois, US


i learned on 35 mm film 10 yrs ago, i learned by doing, im not really a "book smart" type but there are different ways to learn, i would try different approaches ...
Dec 30 12 05:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Karl JW Johnston
Posts: 8,896
Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada


Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
.

agreed

Dec 30 12 05:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony-S
Posts: 1,256
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


ELiffmann wrote:
Can anybody recommend a not-to-heavy book to teach out of?  Any other resources?  The girl is 13 or 14 by the way.

Here's a good start on just getting familiar with photography and composition.

Take a look around : photography activities for young people / Jim Varriale.

http://www.amazon.com/Take-A-Look-Aroun … 076131265X

Dec 30 12 06:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Frank McDonough
Posts: 139
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Images by MR wrote:
I like the book... the new manual of photography by john hedgecoe

Dec 30 12 06:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,478
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


I have not taught  photography in an organized fashion but I have taught classical and folk guitar, HS chem, developed a course for Quebec's Ministry of Education (still on the books), classical piano up to entrance exam level, intellectual property to practicing lawyers (and a few other credit and non-credit courses over the years.
Pedagogically I can see no reason to base a course or even one-on-one teaching via film.  Makes no sense.  when all we had was film sure.  "try this and write down what you did and we will see what it did next week when we get the film back".  but when there is a way to see right away what effect every single change has on the resulting image it just makes no sense to do otherwise. Try this. see what happens? cool? now try this.  now try this. so what is the pattern? yup you understand.  now...lets try this.  one hour to understanding shutter and aperture instead of three weeks.   Film as an adjunct? why not? knowledge is cool. but not as the main 'focus' (pun intended).  I learned by myself on my dad's TLR and on a fully manual camera back in the day when manual wasn't cool and everyone who was hip had meter coupling.  So I'm not coming from digital.

As for the books, since whatever book is chosen will be in addition to one-on-one teaching it probably doesn't matter that much. You worry about books when the person will be using the book alone - big difference in how the learning happens because most people have difficulty learning without a teacher.  Thats why teachers were invented.

I don't think basic photography is that difficult to teach. You can separate out the various things.  should be fun smile
Dec 30 12 06:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kaouthia
Posts: 3,152
Lancaster, England, United Kingdom


Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
For all those other hours she'll be shooting, she's bound to have questions or whatever.  A book is a good thing to have on hand.

So's Google.

Dec 30 12 06:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
photo212grapher
Posts: 1,529
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


Kincaid Blackwood wrote:
You guys who are saying not to recommend the girl a book are killing me. 

There are plenty of print (book) resources that are invaluable in terms of consulting and reading up.  A strategically selected/recommended boom is a resource to which she could repeatedly refer for a number of years.  I'd swear that some of you pretend that you don't read anything more than your own posts. 

This does not mean she won't be given assignments or whatever but have an instructor presumes a number of things.  First that he knows how to instruct.  Second, that the instructor knows and ensures that the pupil knows that learning continues after the session is over.  In fact, it has just begun after the session is over and if you were giving weekly lessons to a student, you'd want that student to have a reading resource to which she can go when there are concerns and questions. 

Why?

Because that promotes a “seek-the-answers-and-figure-out-solutions” approach.  Instead of the “When I get stumped, I'll just ask my instructor.” approach. 

Have things which she should practice on a regular basis as well as new things to try each week.  A book resource will help her with that.  Refine your craft, explore your art.  To refine the craft, there are nuts and bolts things which will immediately improve your ability to get the kinds of pictures you envision.  And as you do those things, you refine your art too.  A good book to begin with in terms of craft is anything beginners exposure book.  Some have been suggested here.  When regarding exploration of the creative side, give her photographers to look at as inspiration, maybe some books she can thumb through at Barnes & Noble or somesuch. 

For all those other hours she'll be shooting, she's bound to have questions or whatever.  A book is a good thing to have on hand.

Reading a book to learn will not teach. You cannot learn to drive by reading the traffic laws. You learn by doing, asking questions, and exploring. That is not to say there is no place for book learning, but without any practical experience, the concepts will be meaningless. You need the student to take pictures, and learn from those. The concepts come through much clearer.

I'd avoid textbooks and scholarly books on photography. Remember her age. Plenty of on-line tutorials, too.

Dec 30 12 06:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
beta
Posts: 2,030
Nashville, Tennessee, US


Lots of opinions,,, guess I will share mine...

Use both, book and hands on - film or digital. The book will be a reference when she has questions and you are not around, and it will aid you in following a sequence of learning events.. : )
Dec 30 12 06:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,478
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


photo212grapher wrote:

Reading a book to learn will not teach. You cannot learn to drive by reading the traffic laws. You learn by doing, asking questions, and exploring. That is not to say there is no place for book learning, but without any practical experience, the concepts will be meaningless. You need the student to take pictures, and learn from those. The concepts come through much clearer.

I'd avoid textbooks and scholarly books on photography. Remember her age. Plenty of on-line tutorials, too.

Did you read the OP? They were looking to teach, not hand a text over to a kid and tell them to come back when they were ready for their first Reuters assignment overseas.   Also remember her age. She is in school. they have textbooks in schools (or at least they did when my kids were in HS a few years ago).  What else other than a textbook do teachers teach from?

Dec 30 12 06:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ELiffmann
Posts: 1,376
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, US


Thanks for the replies folks.  It's been interesting reading.  From the top, thanks, I'll tell them to get Understanding Exposure.   
Bill S., yes focusing on a aps-c dslr is a PITA and no, d40/50 etc won't meter with the old lenses.  My thinking is that she could just chimp her way through it.  With only the shutter speed to spin on-camera that'll take the variables she has to play with way down.  I feel that in dslrs with the 1/3 stop increments for aperture and shutter speed, the numbers can just become a jumble for beginners.  As before, I think actually being able to see the f-stop etched into the aperture ring would be a huge help.  In a few months she could get a 35 1.8 or a 50mm with af and electronic aperture. 
  As for teaching, I teach private guitar lessons for the lion's share of my living and am quite familiar with 13 and 14 year olds(mostly classical AVD and sheesh, there are lots of musicians on here).  At some point a professor threw the four learning types at me, http://www.ehow.com/about_5208167_four- … ning_.html  some of those respond better to books and/or theory than others. 
  I personally don't have the patience, money, facilities and know how to shoot film or slides.  It took me something like three months to shoot a roll of 24.  I'm now at the mercy of my uncle with a dark room.
Dec 30 12 08:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Raoul Isidro Images
Posts: 5,531
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


ELiffmann wrote:
Hi Folks,
  I've been approached by someone about giving their daughter photography lessons.

Get her an entry level DSLR kit from Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, Sony etc.

Get her a Dummies book that is specific to the camera llama.

Don't worry, she can handle this, she's a teenager.

See her after a month.

Half of your hardship of teaching her will be solved.

She may even teach you video editing!

.

Dec 30 12 08:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
photo212grapher
Posts: 1,529
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


AVD AlphaDuctions wrote:

Did you read the OP? They were looking to teach, not hand a text over to a kid and tell them to come back when they were ready for their first Reuters assignment overseas.   Also remember her age. She is in school. they have textbooks in schools (or at least they did when my kids were in HS a few years ago).  What else other than a textbook do teachers teach from?

Never had a textbook for shop class. Never had one for gym or art class. The only "book" for music was a song book, never a how to sing. Teaching predates textbooks.

I have nothing against textbooks and book learning, but I feel it is inappropriate for a teenager beginning to learn the basics. Camera in hand, and guided discovers are a time tested teaching method. then recommend some websites and books.

Dec 30 12 08:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,478
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


photo212grapher wrote:

Never had a textbook for shop class. Never had one for gym or art class. The only "book" for music was a song book, never a how to sing. Teaching predates textbooks.

I have nothing against textbooks and book learning, but I feel it is inappropriate for a teenager beginning to learn the basics. Camera in hand, and guided discovers are a time tested teaching method. then recommend some websites and books.

did you still not read my post even if you didnt read the OP? The OP asked for a book to use while teaching.  Feel all you want.  Thousands of years of teaching and studying the process of teaching have suggested otherwise.  we are supposed to go by your feelings?  and by your poor understanding of the process of teaching. you didnt have a text for shop. great. did you have one for physics? hmmm....wonder why? well good now you are on to something. there is a reason.  People go to school to learn the reasons.  Did you? no. but your feelings trump everything. great.

The OP is a teacher btw. Do you just like going into forums and talking out of your hat?

Dec 30 12 09:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lazyi Photography
Posts: 1,224
Columbus, Ohio, US


photo212grapher wrote:

Never had a textbook for shop class. Never had one for gym or art class. The only "book" for music was a song book, never a how to sing. Teaching predates textbooks.

I have nothing against textbooks and book learning, but I feel it is inappropriate for a teenager beginning to learn the basics. Camera in hand, and guided discovers are a time tested teaching method. then recommend some websites and books.

Huh, I had a textbook for shop, it was taught from to supplement the hands on section, but then my shop class wasn't hanging outside smoking and building bird houses, we restored vintage cars and a historic building. Guess it depends on the quality of education one is after.

Dec 30 12 09:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carlos Occidental
Posts: 10,542
Pasadena, California, US


Not necessarily in this order.  Aperture and shutter speed MUST be on manual for all assignments and exercises. 
Teach depth of field
         shutter speed
         exposure, including over and under for specific reasons
         bracketing
         night/low light shooting
         composition
         effect of wide angle and telephoto on size of aperture and depth of field. 

Encourage using a tripod for ALL basic assignments.  ALL of them! 

Show how the same shot with a 24mm will have to be close up, with great depth of field, while using a telephoto (say, 100mm) will be shot far away, with very shallow depth of field. 

Have several assignments for each item above, while encouraging good composition.  Explain how a crop will improve composition, where necessary. 

Have several assignments including several of the above. 

Encourage her to view as many photos online as possible.  Have her find examples of her own, and you find examples of your own to show her. 

If you have a macro lens, or if she does, include macro photography with a shallow depth of field, and a long depth of field. 

Don't worry about quality of work for exercises.  For depth of field, you could place three small figures 6 inches apart on a table vertically.  It'll explain and show clearly how this works, she can worry about composition later, when applying the concept. 

That's about it for a first level photography class, whether you teach digital, or film.  Those are the basics she needs to know.

I encourage using a book. Especially if she's got an analytical mind.  The more technical, the better.  Hearing it from you is one thing.  If she doesn't quite understand the concept, there's nothing like going home, and reading it again, and again, and again.  Shooting, then reading again and again.  Some things take time to sink in.  But, if she's got an expressive personality, it doesn't matter how great the book is, she's not going to even crack it.

Call your local University, College or CC.  Find out what books they teach out of.  See if you like them.  Maybe, visit their bookstores.
Dec 30 12 09:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DavidV
Posts: 40
Cambridge, Ontario, Canada


Good Egg Productions wrote:
I second the "forget the book" idea.

Teach by doing.
Learn by doing.

Have her find images she likes and then teach her how to accomplish them WHILE explaining why you're doig what you're doing.

Reading a book is nice, but it doesn't always translate to good images. And isn't that the goal?

This!

Dec 30 12 09:19 pm  Link  Quote 
12last   Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers