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Model
MelissaAnn
Posts: 3,877
Seattle, Washington, US


I respond to my messages about 75% of the time, but I must admit that I don't respond to everyone.

Not getting a response doesn't seem to bother some people, but others are bewildered, hurt, or even angry when they don't receive a response to a message they sent.  Everyone has different feelings on this subject, and I'm certainly not going to say anyone's particular feelings are right or wrong.  Honestly, I understand people who don't respond, as well as those who always respond, and all the folks in between.  My hope is that we can perhaps shed some light on the reasons WHY models don't respond, and hopefully this will help the senders of these un-responded-to-messages realize that 1.) it's nothing personal, or that 2.) perhaps there are changes they can make to increase their odds of receiving a response in the future. 

Below I have included two different lists of why I personally don't respond to messages sometimes. The first list includes reasons why I may not respond to an initial message, and the second list includes reasons why I may stop responding after I have begun a dialogue with someone.  I encourage other models to post their reasons here so we can add to this list and use it as a reference.


REASONS WHY A MODEL MAY NOT RESPOND TO AN INITIAL MESSAGE:

1.)  The message isn't specific-doesn't mention if the shoot will be paid or TF.

2.) The offer is insulting.

3.) The original message is more than a couple paragraphs long.  I love specifics, but there's just no need for people to tell their life story in the initial message- it can be very off-putting.

4.) The photographer sending the message doesn't have any MM models credited in their port, and no "credited" photos I can look at.  I like to check references from random models of my choice, not have the photographer only giving me names of ones they want me checking with.

5.)  The senders portfolio hasn't been updated in more than a year, no "credited" photos, and no link to outside work on their profile.

6.)  I get a bad gut feeling, or the sender seems like a complete jackass/delusional- this can include unrealistic demands on profile, excessive bragging (which usually points to extreme insecurity), members of MM for years with few or no friends or tags on profile (they seem to be generally inactive), people that go to great lengths to try and convince me what a "nice guy" they are, anyone that seems overbearing, like they might be drama to deal with.

7.)  The message doesn't ask for a response.  Messages like, "get in touch if you ever want to work with me" or "let me know when you're in my city" etc.

8.) The photographer includes details about their appearance. Example: "I'm a 28-year-old fashion photographer with blond hair and a good build."  This sends the message that they're looking for something other than a shoot.

9.)  I just plain forget.  When I'm traveling, sometimes I'll open a message and won't have the time to adequately respond. From the time I open that message, I get tons of others, the message gets buried pages back in my inbox, I get busy, and I forget to go back far enough to find it again and respond.  There's no excuse for this, but it does occasionally happen.


REASONS WHY A MODEL MAY STOP RESPONDING:

1.)  The sender is clearly not reading my responses and doesn't answer questions.

2.)  Several weeks or a month elapse between more than a few messages (ie: we've been corresponding for 3 months, and still haven't set up a shoot).

3.) Sender refuses to provide their real name, or any contact info.

4.) Sender becomes creepy (ie: say things like "well I'll be paying, so you'll do what I say").

5.)  Sender "failed" the reference check.  For me, this usually means that more than one reputable model had significant negative things to say about them.
Jan 02 13 10:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fashion and Flesh
Posts: 37
CARDIFF BY THE SEA, California, US


I have always wanted to work with exceptional models, and fresh models. So very few of the models I have worked with are on here and very few have modeled beyond what they did with me.  However I am known to some who are on here and some of the models who are not on here would respond to references as well.
So in some ways my approach doesn't mesh with your standard check list. So would it be worth while to try to set something up with you, cause you carry a lot of visual energy (just discovered you actually).
Jan 02 13 10:27 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Damianne
Posts: 15,973
Austin, Texas, US


Too much ego in the first few messages will make me feel like navigating the conversation is a lot of work. If you combine that with just having stuff going on with me where I don't feel like putting forth all that energy into communicating with someone, I may simply stop responding.
Jan 02 13 10:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Garry k
Posts: 26,987
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


Great thread ...Hope to see more models viewpoints on this subject !
Jan 02 13 10:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MelissaAnn
Posts: 3,877
Seattle, Washington, US


Fashion and Flash wrote:
I have always wanted to work with exceptional models, and fresh models. So very few of the models I have worked with are on here and very few have modeled beyond what they did with me.  However I am known to some who are on here and some of the models who are not on here would respond to references as well.
So in some ways my approach doesn't mesh with your standard check list. So would it be worth while to try to set something up with you, cause you carry a lot of visual energy (just discovered you actually).

You may be a perfectly decent person, but for me, no verifiable reputation or web presence equals a No.  I have another full time job, so I simply don't have the time or inclination to try and personally do background checks on people.  Unfortunately, trusting a photographer with no reputation based solely on references of his/her choice of models that are not on MM would not be a wise decision.   

In a nutshell, it's not worth the hassle for me when I have plenty of offers from people with verifiable references of models here on MM.

Thanks for the kind comments, and continued luck with your photography.  smile

Jan 02 13 10:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DougBPhoto
Posts: 37,972
Portland, Oregon, US


OOohhhhh hmm



(just kidding)  tongue



Seriously, very good information, and I hope this is helpful to photographers who may not understand or appreciate why they don't get responses or why responses suddenly stop.

Too many people forget that others don't have unlimited time, and likely have other obligations that need to take precedence.

For as often as threads arise with questions about this sort of thing (from both sides of the PM) it might be nice if something like this can be into a resource for newbies to learn from.
Jan 02 13 10:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fashion and Flesh
Posts: 37
CARDIFF BY THE SEA, California, US


The classic hasty generalization.  I have many ports here and there, show/sell in galleries as fine art and am known in a number of underground circles.  Oh well!!!
Another rejection...you get used to them after a while, makes the exception that much more appreciated.
Jan 02 13 10:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Paige Morgan
Posts: 4,058
New York, New York, US


I've never just dropped communication with someone. I will politely decline certain offers (which some folks don't handle well), but I always respond if for nothing else so that the person knows the message was received/read/considered.

Also, because I have OCD issues, I try to make sure responses are sent out in 24 hours or less.


Not everyone has time to be attached at the hip to their smartphone to that degree though.
Jan 02 13 10:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bravo Magic Images
Posts: 765
Temple City, California, US


I think most do not answer back if they do not get what they want.
Jan 02 13 11:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Glenn Hall - Fine Art
Posts: 431
Townsville, Queensland, Australia


Trying to justify being rude....now that's something I don't see everyday.
Jan 02 13 11:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MelissaAnn
Posts: 3,877
Seattle, Washington, US


Fashion and Flash wrote:
The classic hasty generalization.  I have many ports here and there, show/sell in galleries as fine art and am known in a number of underground circles.  Oh well!!!
Another rejection...you get used to them after a while, makes the exception that much more appreciated.

Perhaps you didn't completely read (or understand) my response?  I'm not making any assumptions about you at all, simply saying that based on your current profile, it wouldn't be worth my time to try and get references on you and verify your reputation. Others may feel differently.  There's nothing wrong with choosing not to work with MM models, or with only having a few "friends", just realize that it limits your opportunities with the models here on MM.  If you're not comfortable with the outcome of your decisions, perhaps you should change something instead of bitching about it and getting butthurt when you're rejected.  Just a thought.

I don't have a whole lot of sympathy for people that choose not to network on MM, don't take the time to build a reputation (or don't include appropriate links on their profile) and then bitch about the fact that MM models won't work with them.  You have complete control of your own success.

Jan 02 13 11:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MelissaAnn
Posts: 3,877
Seattle, Washington, US


Glenn Hall - Fine Art wrote:
Trying to justify being rude....now that's something I don't see everyday.

Not justifying anything, simply providing reasons.

Jan 02 13 11:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
E e v a
Posts: 1,724
Nashville, Tennessee, US


Pretty much just about sums it up honestly lol.

Only thing not up there. I won't work with a photographer if every single shot they have in their portfolio is a workshop shot. This can mean a nonresponse, because its kind of hard to say "Oh hey I wont work with you because most of your work isn't your own" While workshop shots aren't bad, if someone else is setting up your lighting every shoot (i've seen some with it EVERY single shot) and I can tell (especially if i've been in the area a while), its just as bad as not having credited work to me.

Made that mistake once and worked with a photographer who didn't know his lighting from his gigantic rear end.
Jan 02 13 11:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Evie Wolfe
Posts: 1,201
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


This topic seems to be coming up a lot recently, huh?

For my part, I try to respond to everyone who sends me a message, but I will avoid responding to someone who gives off the vibe that they will become aggressive if they don't recieve the answer they want. I've only had a few of these in the years I've been modelling, but it's not something I want to risk happening again. One of them got really weird.
Jan 02 13 11:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DougBPhoto
Posts: 37,972
Portland, Oregon, US


Glenn Hall - Fine Art wrote:
Trying to justify being rude....now that's something I don't see everyday.

Ever since I joined this site, I have regularly heard it said that..

"No reply IS a reply", basically that if you don't get a reply, the person is likely not interested.

This is something repeatedly debated, and the "rude" term gets thrown around, but the reality is that it is becoming more and more normal across most businesses, and really communications on this site are about business.

When people submit job applications or resumes, it is not normal to get a reply, that is just how things are anymore.

Even when you go in and interview in person, you may not hear anything unless you get the job.

There are many other situations in business "no response is a response" is becoming normal, or at least very common.

So, it really isn't justifying it, it IS a pretty thoughtful (initial) explanation to help people better understand how things often work out on this site.

If you or others choose not to learn from the information being shared for your benefit, that is entirely your loss.

Jan 02 13 11:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Glenn Hall - Fine Art
Posts: 431
Townsville, Queensland, Australia


no loss here at all. I call it for what it is.
Jan 02 13 11:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony Lawrence
Posts: 19,068
Chicago, Illinois, US


So many MM models shoot themselves in the foot.   The ideal is to build bridges, network, add and grow your portfolio and make money.   Difficult to do if you won't reply or stop suddenly.   If someone has offended you or they fail the 'reference' check or for any other reason you don't want to work with them.   Tell them you're busy.   Tell them you aren't available to shoot or tell them about their poor references but say something .   I know some here are big fans of references but many of the shooters who may offer payment will have no or few references.   

That said.   If you are going to call yourself a professional model then act professionally.   Reply to emails and calls.   If someone is rude or aggressive and or you decide for any reason you no longer want to work with them say so.   If they continue CAM and block them.   A MM model approached me about a shoot.   I replied, nothing.   She then wrote me from a CL ad.   Not knowing it was me.   I wrote her and mentioned her initial tag here.   She said that paid work came first and I was offering TF.   How would she know when she never replied to my message and again she tagged me.    Models do yourself a solid.   Respond to all serious offers, TF or not.   Being in business means being about business.
Jan 02 13 11:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Garry k
Posts: 26,987
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


Tony Lawrence wrote:
So many MM models shoot themselves in the foot.   The ideal is to build bridges, network, add and grow your portfolio and make money.   Difficult to do if you won't reply or stop suddenly.   If someone has offended you or they fail the 'reference' check or for any other reason you don't want to work with them.   Tell them you're busy.   Tell them you aren't available to shoot or tell them about their poor references but say something .   I know some here are big fans of references but many of the shooters who may offer payment will have no or few references.   

That said.   If you are going to call yourself a professional model then act professionally.   Reply to emails and calls.   If someone is rude or aggressive and or you decide for any reason you no longer want to work with them say so.   If they continue CAM and block them.   A MM model approached me about a shoot.   I replied, nothing.   She then wrote me from a CL ad.   Not knowing it was me.   I wrote her and mentioned her initial tag here.   She said that paid work came first and I was offering TF.   How would she know when she never replied to my message and again she tagged me.    Models do yourself a solid.   Respond to all serious offers, TF or not.   Being in business means being about business.

Why dont we just let the models speak Tony , sit back and perhaps learn something ?

Jan 02 13 11:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Neil Snape
Posts: 9,456
Paris, Île-de-France, France


Nice to see an experienced model state what should be evident but isn't always for others.

You might want to add that you would likely not respond to requests outside of certain structures like PM, email, etc. if you don't do that.

Truly and sincerely wish our paths cross someday.....
Jan 02 13 11:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony Lawrence
Posts: 19,068
Chicago, Illinois, US


Garry k wrote:

Why dont we just let the models speak Tony , sit back and perhaps learn something ?

My bad.

Jan 03 13 12:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RKD Photographic
Posts: 3,265
Iserlohn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany


It also helps to listen to what the llamas who do respond (negatively) say:

I PMd a llama about 6 weeks ago requesting a TFP shoot and she politely declined, saying she liked my work but felt that it wouldn't add to her port.
I'd sent her my usual generic "no real concept, but you have a nice look and I'd like to work with you" message that I usually open negotiations with.

So I went back, looked hard at her port, thought about what she didn't have and came up with a concept sufficiently stimulating for her to change her mind.
We now have a shoot booked for next month that she's sufficiently interested-in to have taken a day off from her day-job to attend.

Just because a llama shoots (for example) art-nude, does what you do differ significantly from the other shots in her port to justify a TFP shoot with you?

(In the case of pay-offers, llamas should just take the money as the quality of the images is pretty much irrelevent.)
Jan 03 13 04:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
denis071
Posts: 93
Sarajevo, Federacija Bosna i Hercegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina


quote:
4.) The photographer sending the message doesn't have any MM models credited in their port, and no "credited" photos I can look at.  I like to check references from random models of my choice, not have the photographer only giving me names of ones they want me checking with.


question to you:
how you expect for photographer to have MM model credit if models do not answer to photographers' call without MM model credits????
Jan 03 13 04:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
denis071
Posts: 93
Sarajevo, Federacija Bosna i Hercegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina


DougBPhoto wrote:

Ever since I joined this site, I have regularly heard it said that..

"No reply IS a reply", basically that if you don't get a reply, the person is likely not interested.

This is something repeatedly debated, and the "rude" term gets thrown around, but the reality is that it is becoming more and more normal across most businesses, and really communications on this site are about business.

When people submit job applications or resumes, it is not normal to get a reply, that is just how things are anymore.

Even when you go in and interview in person, you may not hear anything unless you get the job.

There are many other situations in business "no response is a response" is becoming normal, or at least very common.

So, it really isn't justifying it, it IS a pretty thoughtful (initial) explanation to help people better understand how things often work out on this site.

If you or others choose not to learn from the information being shared for your benefit, that is entirely your loss.

disagree.

no response means that all answers are still open. negative or positive response is real response.

without response to any person just showing that you disrespect the person and, at the end, is an image of your behavior.

in IT communication not to answer to an e-mail is a matter of cultural respect of a person who sent you e-mail. i'm not talking about someone who sent you 20 e-mails in 2 days but an answer to an normal e-mail should be sent back. at least in decent world of communciation.

if you beleive that no response is response and you are OK with it, it's story how much you respect you self.

Jan 03 13 04:58 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Abby Hawkins
Posts: 2,002
Boston, Massachusetts, US


For me, it's plain and simple: the project doesn't appeal to me, or the photographer's calibre is not up to par.

I used to reply with some polite, "This trade project is just not right for me at this time."  I then would offer my rates if they were still interested in using me.  And WOW -- you'd think I had asked them to be my personal maid for the next month.  Then I nixed the rates portion, and still got photographers belly-aching over me not wanting to do a project with them.  So these days, I just don't respond.  I have a busy enough life as it is.
Jan 03 13 05:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vector One Photography
Posts: 2,695
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US


I still think it's rude and unprofessional to leave someone hanging.  Without a reply you don't know if you should go find another model or give it some more time.  Here's the problem, you assume that you're just one in a long line of succession and the photographer will just move on to the next one on his list. It may be that you fit a specific need in the shoot and he'd rather have you.

And some of the reasons are just rationalizations. If you can articulate a reason in your posting then you could articulate the reason in a reply. Or just a simple, "I'm going to have to decline your offer." would be nice.
Jan 03 13 05:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aperture_Photo
Posts: 478
Chicago, Illinois, US


Vector One Photography wrote:
I still think it's rude and unprofessional to leave someone hanging.  Without a reply you don't know if you should go find another model or give it some more time.  Here's the problem, you assume that you're just one in a long line of succession and the photographer will just move on to the next one on his list. It may be that you fit a specific need in the shoot and he'd rather have you.

And some of the reasons are just rationalizations. If you can articulate a reason in your posting then you could articulate the reason in a reply. Or just a simple, "I'm going to have to decline your offer." would be nice.

+1

And if you create a casting or travel post - check your mail?
So many times I get a reply weeks later, Sorry I missed that....really it's just common courtesy!

Jan 03 13 05:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
In Balance Photography
Posts: 3,370
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Vector One Photography wrote:
I still think it's rude and unprofessional to leave someone hanging.
...

I think the erroneous thinking here is that by virtue of being a photographer one automatically has a professional relationship with a model.

I don't consider it rude to not to reply to junk mail, or calls from recruiters, or calls from telemarketers. That's because there's no relationship between them and I.

..and when a model doesn't respond to an offer, it could be very well because they think it the equivalent of junk mail. I know that can sting, but that's the reality.

Jan 03 13 06:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
mark hollywood
Posts: 455
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia


If someone is polite and sends a msg its not that hard to be polite back regardless if you wish to work with them or not. Even a Thx for your interest but ill pass on this occasion is all that is needed and just remember the person who you feel is not worthy a reply just may be the one whos ass you may be kissing one day smile
Jan 03 13 06:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 4,075
Alexandria, Virginia, US


That all sounds entirely reasonable to me.

I'd add that it would make sense to me to not respond if you are just seriously not interested for any reason -   too many photographers get seriously butthurt and will nag you for reasons or try to change your mind.    Some will take it to higher levels of drama.....

I have a list of reasons I don't respond as well -  I wonder if I should post it elsewhere to get that conversation started as well.....

"Life is short, and time's expensive"
Jan 03 13 06:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 4,075
Alexandria, Virginia, US


mark hollywood wrote:
If someone is polite and sends a msg its not that hard to be polite back regardless if you wish to work with them or not. Even a Thx for your interest but ill pass on this occasion is all that is needed and just remember the person who you feel is not worthy a reply just may be the one whos ass you may be kissing one day smile

When I started off here I got a lot of non-response -  I was only reaching out to fairly established llamas for the most part.....

as my work improved and my credits expanded quite a few of those same llamas started hitting me up -

I am absolutely not vindictive about it -  if they fit my project I will work with them.  Sure I will probably mention their prior non-interest at some point if we are getting along - we can both have a laugh about it -

no "ass kissing" required....

Jan 03 13 06:36 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Anna Adrielle
Posts: 18,763
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


Vector One Photography wrote:
I still think it's rude and unprofessional to leave someone hanging.  Without a reply you don't know if you should go find another model or give it some more time.  Here's the problem, you assume that you're just one in a long line of succession and the photographer will just move on to the next one on his list. It may be that you fit a specific need in the shoot and he'd rather have you.

And some of the reasons are just rationalizations. If you can articulate a reason in your posting then you could articulate the reason in a reply. Or just a simple, "I'm going to have to decline your offer." would be nice.

yes, that would be nice. except for the butthurt responses you often get...

the OP summed it up perfectly for me.

Jan 03 13 06:39 am  Link  Quote 
Model
angel emily
Posts: 1,020
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Here's the thing:

I know that I'M okay with a "no reply" -- even prefer it in many circumstances -- but I know that many others here, particularly photographers, are NOT okay with it.

So, do I risk losing future business and reputation by unintentionally "snubbing" people? 

No.   When someone takes the time to send me a request and I'm not interested, I send a reply.

While a no response may be the "thing to do" in the professional world, and I accept that, many here don't understand that or live in that world.  There's a lot of fragile egos, especially when you're encountering amatuers who take rejection personally.   For this reason, I never say anything like "I don't think your work matches my skill level" or "I don't think you're right for this project", nor do I say "Not interested, here's my rates" -- some people can handle this honesty, but most can't, and I know many who would prefer a "no response" than one of these responses, however honest and kindly intended! I'm not at all surprised to hear about butt-hurt backlash when I read these dialogues!

If I think the photographer would be great for another project, I offer that.  Or, if I'm really not interested, I say thank you, and mention what I'm currently working on.  More often than not, it's about genre differences than quality differences.   I find that when you get a certain caliber quality portfolio, the amount of lame requests diminishes.

You might get someone, occasionally, who feels they really can bring a lot of "spark" to your portfolio and turning them down IS the worst decision you'll ever make.  Best of luck with these guys -- no matter what you say, if your answer is anything but "Yes, of course!" be prepared for some "How dare you, nobody rejects me!" kind of response.  At which point you roll your eyes and move on.
Jan 03 13 06:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,864
Olivet, Michigan, US


MelissaAnn  wrote:
3.) The original message is more than a couple paragraphs long.  I love specifics, but there's just no need for people to tell their life story in the initial message- it can be very off-putting.

I hear a lot of complaints about photographers not providing enough information in a first message, but one model showed me the first message she got from some guy.

It was WAY longer than the full original post of this thread.

Jan 03 13 06:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,864
Olivet, Michigan, US


Fashion and Flash wrote:
The classic hasty generalization.  I have many ports here and there, show/sell in galleries as fine art and am known in a number of underground circles.  Oh well!!!
Another rejection...you get used to them after a while, makes the exception that much more appreciated.

You got a polite explanation.  Not everything works out for everyone.  I have several ports, some of which are mainly for storage and display of images in specific styles.  They have few friends or tags.  So, I don't use them for initial contact, precisely because they don't let a model see my interactions.

Jan 03 13 06:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camabs
Posts: 323
Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands


Garry k wrote:
Why dont we just let the models speak Tony , sit back and perhaps learn something ?

This.

I think this is a very useful thread. No one likes being ignored, but if it happens, you have two options:

1) complain about it
2) find out why and learn from it

Category 1) ppl, please open a diferent thread and allow category 2) ppl to learn from this thread without having to go through your irrelevant complaints.

Thx OP for starting this and being honest smile

Jan 03 13 07:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DavidCoward Photography
Posts: 629
Sandy Springs, Georgia, US


Here's where the junk mail/telemarketer analogy breaks down, IMHO:

Junk mail and telemarketers are impersonal. Both use a mass "shotgun" approach to doing business. Spam as many people as you can and hope for a few bites. If you're on the receiving end of that effort, there's no need to respond.

When I'm interested in working with a model, I take the time to write a personal message to her. If she's provided a name, I use that in my greeting. All I expect is a personal message in reply. If she declines, I send one more message thanking her and wishing her well, and that's it. If she doesn't reply at all, then I'll assume she's not professional enough to work with anyway.
Jan 03 13 07:24 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B Ballard Photography
Posts: 1,560
Savannah, Georgia, US


I don't participate in the forums too often, but this thread caught my eye. In the years I've been a member here, I'm hard pressed to think of a time when a message I had sent to a model (or anyone else on MM) has been totally ignored. FWIW, I respond to each one I receive. And while I agree that messages should be kept concise and to the point, doing so may still result in messages consisting of multiple paragraphs. (And before I'm accused of hypocrisy, I'm rewriting my profile so that it is more concise and to the point!)

However, I do disagree with the following as being a sound basis for a 'no reply':

MelissaAnn  wrote:
4.) The photographer sending the message doesn't have any MM models credited in their port, and no "credited" photos I can look at.  I like to check references from random models of my choice, not have the photographer only giving me names of ones they want me checking with.

Models in my portfolio are not credited for one of two reasons:

1.) They are not a member of Model Mayhem; or
2.) They have asked not to be credited as they don't want to be hounded for nude work.

Simply not having credited images is not, IMHO, a reason to completely write off an inquiry. What's wrong with asking for references? Simply because a model is credited doesn't guarantee a more trustworthy reference from them, any more than had the photographer provided you with them. When I'm asked for references, I not only give models, but assistants, gallery directors, etc. After all, character and reputation aren't left on the set.

Just my .02.

Jan 03 13 07:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Artfully Explicit Photo
Posts: 1
Hickory, North Carolina, US


My messages are usually brief and to the point. I even say in my profile, which many do not read, PLEASE respond back, even if with a no thanks. I think it is just being professional. Take a few seconds and respond. It also gives you the opportunity to state why you are not interested. I have sent messages to models, did not get a response, then later was contacted by that model wanting to do a shoot. I always respond, and to those models it is with a not interested because...
Treat others as you would want to be treated, and remember, fill your piece of the world with love.
Jan 03 13 07:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
L Cowles Photography
Posts: 833
Corona, California, US


I don't see your first reason,

REASONS WHY A MODEL MAY NOT RESPOND TO AN INITIAL MESSAGE:

1.)  The message isn't specific-doesn't mention if the shoot will be paid or TF.

I would think this is a reason to reply.

If everything else looks good, you would think you would write back and ask if it is TF and give your rates if you are only interested in paid work.
Jan 03 13 07:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 4,075
Alexandria, Virginia, US


L Cowles Photography wrote:
I don't see your first reason,

REASONS WHY A MODEL MAY NOT RESPOND TO AN INITIAL MESSAGE:

1.)  The message isn't specific-doesn't mention if the shoot will be paid or TF.

I would think this is a reason to reply.

If everything else looks good, you would think you would write back and ask if it is TF and give your rates if you are only interested in paid work.

+1 -    I agree -   it is a simple question -

I do not initially mention rates -   I'm certainly not up for paying "asking" rates or anywhere near them....    if the model is otherwise interested in the shoot that's the time to ask about rates or state her rates or open the discussion......

Jan 03 13 07:49 am  Link  Quote 
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