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Forums > Photography Talk > SB900's at the Pawn Shop Search   Reply
Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,560
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Our local pawn shops never have anything good. But the other day I spotted 2 SB900's and I want to go get them. Does anyone know how to tell if they're 1st or 2nd generation?
Jan 09 13 01:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PDF IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY
Posts: 4,556
Jacksonville, Florida, US


contact Nikon customer service, if you found those in a pawn shop and they reasonable priced make sure they fire and see about a warranty some pawn shops allow this it may be a great find.
Jan 09 13 02:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


John Jebbia wrote:
Our local pawn shops never have anything good. But the other day I spotted 2 SB900's and I want to go get them. Does anyone know how to tell if they're 1st or 2nd generation?

Which pawn shop?

Jan 09 13 02:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
You Can Call Me Pierre
Posts: 709
Montreal, Quebec, Canada


There are two generations of SB-900?
I only know that it was replaced outright instead of revised.
You can check firmware by holding down OK for a few seconds to enter the advanced menu options.
Jan 09 13 02:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leo Howard
Posts: 6,653
Phoenix, Arizona, US


gl-amour wrote:
There are two generations of SB-900?
I only know that it was replaced outright instead of revised.
Reset, select SU-4, bring a lightmeter and test the zoom range.

1st generation would he the original version that had serious overheating issues, 2nd generation would be the ones they corrected that issue on.

Or, am I thniking of something else. I know there was a pronlem with the early SB900 and I thought Nikon fixed the issue.

Jan 09 13 02:23 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Robb Mann
Posts: 9,505
Baltimore, Maryland, US


The oberheating issue was fixed via a firmware update. I think any 'ver 1' flash can be made a 'ver 2' free of charge and in your home.
Jan 09 13 02:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gaze at Photography
Posts: 4,371
Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, US


Hero Foto wrote:
Which pawn shop?

lol



If they were reasonably priced, I wouldnt care

Jan 09 13 02:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Alien LiFe
Posts: 784
San Francisco, California, US


Yes, the overheating problem was 'fixed' with firmware update ... as far as I know ...
There is no ver. 2 ... Nikon replace SB900 with SB910 after that ...

I have 6 900s and planning to sell 4 of those for I want to get into Profoto system ...
Jan 09 13 02:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Gaze at Photography wrote:
lol If they were reasonably priced, I wouldnt care

exactly ... which is why I asked which pawn shop ... I'll snag them right now ... firmware is EASY to update ... and I could always use a few more OEM branded speedlights ...

http://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers … a_id/16174

Jan 09 13 02:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Larry Quick
Posts: 117
Royal Palm Beach, Florida, US


Alien LiFe wrote:
Yes, the overheating problem was 'fixed' with firmware update ... as far as I know ...
There is no ver. 2 ... Nikon replace SB900 with SB910 after that ...

I have 6 900s and planning to sell 4 of those for I want to get into Profoto system ...

Jan 09 13 02:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Larry Quick
Posts: 117
Royal Palm Beach, Florida, US


Larry Quick wrote:

I will buy them, how musch are you asking?

Jan 09 13 02:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Nemeth
Posts: 25,894
Dearborn, Michigan, US


Hero Foto wrote:

Which pawn shop?

Don't tell him John!!

Jan 09 13 02:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Jerry Nemeth wrote:

Don't tell him John!!

Brutal ... booooooooooo

Jan 09 13 03:05 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
GPS Studio Services
Posts: 33,445
San Francisco, California, US


First, it wasn't an over-heating issue, it was an "under-heating" issue.   Nikon installed a circuit into the flash which would prevent it from operating if the unit was being used tooi heavily or if it was over-heating.   The problem is that it turned the unit off well before it needed to be.  The flash was not over-heating, it was just being turned off too soon.

Second, everyone is correct, the problem can be corrected by a free firmware update.    Even without the update, there is no danger of damaging the flash.  It just could be annoying if it refused to fire when it actually should.  In either case, the correction is trivial.
Jan 09 13 03:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,560
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Hero Foto wrote:
Which pawn shop?

I'm not telling.

Jan 09 13 03:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


John Jebbia wrote:

I'm not telling.

Boooo wink

Jan 09 13 03:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
3934
Posts: 569
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Trivia question...do you know how many phone calls I've made in the past two hours?
Jan 09 13 03:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kaouthia
Posts: 3,152
Lancaster, England, United Kingdom


If it's got SB-900 written on it, it's first generation.

If it's got SB-910 written on it, it's second generation. wink

There is only one SB-900.
Jan 09 13 04:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,478
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


Sand Angel Photography wrote:
Trivia question...do you know how many phone calls I've made in the past two hours?

it will serve you bloody well right that the price of used ones goes through the roof locally.

Jan 09 13 04:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Sand Angel Photography wrote:
Trivia question...do you know how many phone calls I've made in the past two hours?

ROFL ...

Jan 09 13 04:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Image Works Photography
Posts: 2,890
Orlando, Florida, US


My local pawn shops normally sell crap so If I see this I would of jump quick and try them out.
Jan 09 13 11:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Blue Ash Film Group
Posts: 9,145
Cincinnati, Ohio, US


John Jebbia wrote:

I'm not telling.

There can't be that many pwn shops in Phoenix.

Jan 09 13 11:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Charger Photography
Posts: 1,699
San Antonio, Texas, US


Blue Ash Film Group wrote:

There can't be that many pwn shops in Phoenix.

hahahahaha No kidding !!!

Jan 09 13 11:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 14,699
Orlando, Florida, US


Charger Photography wrote:

Blue Ash Film Group wrote:
There can't be that many pwn shops in Phoenix.

hahahahaha No kidding !!!

Are you kidding?

I'd say Phoenix is about the same size as Orlando. I'll check after writing this.

There's probably on the scale of 200 pawn shops here. They're everywhere.

Edit: just checked. Phoenix metro has twice the population of Orlando metro and 4 times the area.

Jan 09 13 11:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


There are pawnshop on just about every corner ...

like circle K and check cashing/loan shark huts ...

I could narrow it down by his location in the metro area ...

But, I have no idea of his wanderings, he's a photographer, we wander ...
Jan 10 13 04:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
3934
Posts: 569
Phoenix, Arizona, US


He probably just posted this to waste your time hunting for them while he breaks into your house and steals your stuff.

Phoenix has a larger population than Orlando but the downtown area feels like it is about the same size. We just have more sprawl.

But then I thought Phoenix was big until I made the mistake of driving to Los Angeles. lol.
Jan 10 13 08:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Zack Zoll
Posts: 2,058
Glens Falls, New York, US


GPS Studio Services wrote:
First, it wasn't an over-heating issue, it was an "under-heating" issue.   Nikon installed a circuit into the flash which would prevent it from operating if the unit was being used tooi heavily or if it was over-heating.   The problem is that it turned the unit off well before it needed to be.  The flash was not over-heating, it was just being turned off too soon.

Second, everyone is correct, the problem can be corrected by a free firmware update.    Even without the update, there is no danger of damaging the flash.  It just could be annoying if it refused to fire when it actually should.  In either case, the correction is trivial.

They will actually overheat and melt, but you need to (A) turn off the inhibitor, (B) use quick-recycling Ni-MH batteries - I'm not sure normal Ni-MHs will do it, and (C) fire the thing as fast as it will go at full power for about 20-30 seconds straight.  Long story short, unless you're a wedding or sports photographer that uses the flash with batteries it's not designed to be used with, it's not really an issue.  It's all pretty overblown, if you ask me.   I no longer own an SB-900, but I never had any problems when I did, and certainly not for studio stuff.

Plus you could do that with the same batteries in a quick-recycling pack connected to an SB-800, or almost anything else.  I've never fried a flash, but I *have* burned myself on batteries taking them out of the quick-recycle pack.

Sand Angel Photography wrote:
But then I thought Phoenix was big until I made the mistake of driving to Los Angeles. lol.

I'm pretty sure that's a mistake no matter what tongue

Jan 10 13 08:57 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
GPS Studio Services
Posts: 33,445
San Francisco, California, US


GPS Studio Services wrote:
First, it wasn't an over-heating issue, it was an "under-heating" issue.   Nikon installed a circuit into the flash which would prevent it from operating if the unit was being used tooi heavily or if it was over-heating.   The problem is that it turned the unit off well before it needed to be.  The flash was not over-heating, it was just being turned off too soon.

Second, everyone is correct, the problem can be corrected by a free firmware update.    Even without the update, there is no danger of damaging the flash.  It just could be annoying if it refused to fire when it actually should.  In either case, the correction is trivial.
Zack Zoll wrote:
They will actually overheat and melt, but you need to (A) turn off the inhibitor, (B) use quick-recycling Ni-MH batteries - I'm not sure normal Ni-MHs will do it, and (C) fire the thing as fast as it will go at full power for about 20-30 seconds straight.  Long story short, unless you're a wedding or sports photographer that uses the flash with batteries it's not designed to be used with, it's not really an issue.  It's all pretty overblown, if you ask me.   I no longer own an SB-900, but I never had any problems when I did, and certainly not for studio stuff.

Plus you could do that with the same batteries in a quick-recycling pack connected to an SB-800, or almost anything else.  I've never fried a flash, but I *have* burned myself on batteries taking them out of the quick-recycle pack.

I agree, people just need to understand the difference between a "serious overheating issue" and misuse of the equipment.  As you have said, the SB-800 did that as well, as will flashes made by other manufacturers if pushed beyond their specifications.  I have an SB-800 that was given to me and it is all melted. 

Nikon, (as does Canon, Sony, Vivitar, etc) all have specs which tell you what you can do or not do with your flash.  People, particularly wedding photographers and others that push the crap out of them, will often exceed those specs.  That is how I ended up with a slightly overheated SB-800.

In response, in the SB-900 Nikon put in a circuit which would prevent the flash from overheating if the photographer ABUSED it.  The complaint that the circuit was too conservative.  Quite literally, what it does is if it thinks the flash is getting warm, it prevents the flash from firing.  People were losing shots when the flash was nowhere near being in danger of being damaged.  Nikon updated the firmware so that the flash didn't lock up as quickly, i.e. it waited until the temperature was higher before it engaged.

In the SB-910, they took a different approach.  As the flash gets warmer, rather than locking up, it extends the recycle time.  The result is that the flash can't overheat but you also don't lose shots.  You just can't shoot as fast.

The flash also has a feature where you can disengage the protection, which is what you are describing.  If you do that, fire the flash as fast as you can for as long as you can, you will eventually damage it, badly.  I watched someone do that to a Canon flash in my studio a couple of months ago during an evening rental.

If you choose to beat the crap out of your flash, that isn't a "serious over-heating problem" for the flash, that is "serious misuse" on the part of the photographer.  All strobes will overheat.  Photographers come to the studio and fry my studio strobes if I am not staying on top of them.  Every time you fire them they generate heat.  They need time to cool.

The firmware update had nothing to do with the problem you are describing.  It is not Nikon's fault if a photographer chooses to abuse his equipment.  If they play by the rules, the SB-900 will never overheat.

Jan 10 13 11:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,560
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Blue Ash Film Group wrote:
There can't be that many pwn shops in Phoenix.

Actually there's a shit ton here.

Jan 10 13 12:40 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Robb Mann
Posts: 9,505
Baltimore, Maryland, US


So, has anyone bought these things yet?
Jan 11 13 04:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Phil W
Posts: 20
Florence, South Carolina, US


I know a photographer in CT who is selling multiple SB-900s if you are interested.  I bough one last year.  PM me if you are interested since I don't get notified of replies to my posts.
Jan 11 13 04:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KFM Designs
Posts: 685
Flagstaff, Arizona, US


I saw a 5DMK II in one in Flagstaff about two years ago, the price was good but not great so I passed.
Jan 11 13 09:14 am  Link  Quote 
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