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Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


shot a wedding last night and one of the guests noticed the wife's x-pro1 and showed off his new fuji x-e1 and then said his normal camera was a D-800 but he didn't feel like bringing that along. i asked him if he shot professionally and he said he did it just for fun. he didn't interfere or anything but it's hard to outgun the guests these days unless you have like  a D4. during the cake cutting there must have been 20 guests shooting although they did let me get my shots.

we did some shots with a Bel Air in the dark and the x-pro1 again outperformed my canon 5D MK II at ISO6400. and it's not even full-frame. fuji did something special in making that sensor.

just seems like within a few years if everyone is running around with X-E1 class cameras then they can get good shots in the dark, too. so a "pro" will have to distinguish themselves through other means than camera technology. but maybe that has always been the case.
Jan 13 13 10:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KA Style
Posts: 1,549
Syracuse, New York, US


It does not bother me and either way they still have to know how to use it.. Most dont, they think they do or they think owning a better camera will get thembetter pictures.
Jan 13 13 10:11 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


with the fuji it's pretty easy so long as you understand the need to crank ISO in dark conditions. the x-pro1 has auto ISO but a tendency to dial in too slow of a shutter speed for people (it should let you set a floor on shutter speed). of course there's flash to consider but i think the ex-1 does have a built-in flash. and the fuji's aren't exactly action cameras.

i agree that using a traditional d-slr, especially with flash, takes some knowledge and the right lenses for the job. for my part, i'm still learning and i may need to pick up a 16-35f2.8

for last night's wedding a guest posted some weird instagram shot (simulated light leak) of the bride walking down the aisle. hopefully there's still room for some clean, tasteful shots.

the church lady wanted us to shoot from the balcony (she said all photographers did it that way). once she took off i sat in the front row. i'm not a landscape shooter.

KA Style wrote:
It does not bother me and either way they still have to know how to use it.. Most dont, they think they do or they think owning a better camera will get thembetter pictures.

Jan 13 13 10:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dragos Codita
Posts: 82
Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania


I was on both sides. Been on weddings with Canon 5D and 24-70 f/2.8 and finding that the oficial photog had a Canon 40D with 18-135. Also been at a wedding with the same 5D and a bag of red ring lenses and a guest had a Nikon D4.
Don't worry, everybody has its own duties.
Jan 13 13 10:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KA Style
Posts: 1,549
Syracuse, New York, US


My go to is 24-70, 70-200, and my 50. Sometimes a macro. My 50/24-70 gets me plenty good enough shot for details.

I rent the 70-200 as i only use it for the ceremony usually/event shooting. In time I'll get one but for now I spend the money in another area thats higher priority for what a zoom like that costs.

Ive never shot in a church lol. My couples just dont get married in churches.. 95% of the time its at the venue. Either way if I think I need something because of a particular location I rent what I need to get the job done.
Jan 13 13 10:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


i got caught with the wrong lens on for the garter toss (they had told me we were going outside to shoot the car in the dark so i put on my 50f1.4 and then suddenly they announced the garter toss) and they didn't wait for me to put back on my wide angle lens. weddings kind of take on a life of their own and with so many guests shooting now (sometimes as many as 20) maybe they don't even notice if the "official" photographer is missing.

it just makes me wonder if there will come a time when there just isn't a need for an official event photographer, except maybe for the formals and some specialty shots (our brides are doing their own albums through shutter fly). then again, the guests might do some weird instagram thing to every image. lol.

so maybe our role isn't necessarily to get better images than the guests but rather to deliver comprehensive coverage in a timely manner.

Dragos Codita wrote:
Don't worry, everybody has its own duties.

Jan 13 13 10:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Jewett
Posts: 2,428
al-Marsā, Tunis, Tunisia


"When everyone has access to the same tools then having a tool isn’t much of an advantage. The industrial age, the age of scarcity, depended in part on the advantages that came with owning tools others didn’t own. Time for a new advantage. It might be your network, the connections that trust you. And it might be your expertise. But most of all, I’m betting it’s your attitude." --Seth Godin
Jan 13 13 10:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


we get hired because people say that it looks like everyone is having fun in our photos. welcome to photographer as cruise director. during the formals i was shooting just the ladies and told them all to turn around and bend over. they didn't (darn) but i got some really good shots of them after that.

Robert Jewett wrote:
But most of all, I’m betting it’s your attitude." --Seth Godin

Jan 13 13 10:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,178
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Look at it this way when Nikon releases the D900 (or whatever) there will be tons of low shutter count next to new D800's on the market lol

I'ts a good day when BestBuy oversells a consumer, they barley use it and treat it way better then a pro who considers it just a tool to be used; it's their baby
Jan 13 13 10:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Anthony J Deffina
Posts: 80
Shingle Springs, California, US


twoharts wrote:
with the fuji it's pretty easy so long as you understand the need to crank ISO in dark conditions. the x-pro1 has auto ISO but a tendency to dial in too slow of a shutter speed for people (it should let you set a floor on shutter speed). of course there's flash to consider but i think the ex-1 does have a built-in flash. and the fuji's aren't exactly action cameras.

i agree that using a traditional d-slr, especially with flash, takes some knowledge and the right lenses for the job. for my part, i'm still learning and i may need to pick up a 16-35f2.8

for last night's wedding a guest posted some weird instagram shot (simulated light leak) of the bride walking down the aisle. hopefully there's still room for some clean, tasteful shots.

the church lady wanted us to shoot from the balcony (she said all photographers did it that way). once she took off i sat in the front row. i'm not a landscape shooter.


Not trying to sound like an ass here but it doesn't sound like you should be shooting weddings on your own yet.

Things to consider:

1) No wedding photographer should be shooting without at at least one 2.8 or wider in their bag. As you've learned, ability to shoot in low light without a flash is a must.

2) Shooting from a balcony is common place, at least part of the time. Wide shots of the ceremony are very important. In addition to that, it's important that the photographer not become part of the ceremony. You should not be noticed. You're lucky the bride didn't come unglued with you sitting in the front row, or more likely the mother of the bride. Fine if you got permission first though.

3) You should also be sure to have two of everything with you. Don't know if you did or did not but always be sure to.

4) Camera capabilities will always get better, that's life. You will always run across someone with new or better. The two things you need to be concerned with are if you are equipped with what you need to get the job done right and do you have a style that sets you apart from the crowd.

Jan 13 13 10:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
redbanana
Posts: 775
Lexington, Kentucky, US


Wedding guest crack me up at times. I had one bust out a D4 on me and tried talking up his gear over mine while in front of the bride and groom. He was an uncle through marriage to the groom so I played nice with him even after he kept claiming how crappy the shots from my D700 would be. He even went as far as telling the brides mom not to buy an album because he would give them one free (from his amazing camera) as a wedding gift.

During our print order consultation they brought in the "wedding album" he gave them. Now I do not talk bad of anyone's work ... ever. I won't start today but I will say that thanks to his album I sold three of my own that day lol.
Jan 13 13 10:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yum Yum Photo
Posts: 442
Park Ridge, New Jersey, US


LOL.... On a church photostudy I had a guy kept shadowing me taking pictures and then he would point out he had a better camera  several times.... I kept replying it was important how you use your camera then what sort of camera you had.
Jan 13 13 10:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GCobb Photography
Posts: 15,885
Southaven, Mississippi, US


I've got 2 weddings in about 5 weeks.  I'm not really concerned with what Uncle Bob shows up with.  It doesn't affect me one way or the other.  I am the one hired, not someone else who has a camera.
Jan 13 13 10:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


when life gives you lemons ...

we had a guy come in trying to sell us advertising and he brought an album he had made at a relative's wedding and asked us for a critique. it was outdoors on a ranch and he actually did a pretty good job overall (although the post-processing wasn't the best).

Photosbycj wrote:
During our print order consultation they brought in the "wedding album" he gave them. Now I do not talk bad of anyone's work ... ever. I won't start today but I will say that thanks to his album I sold three of my own that day lol.

Jan 13 13 10:47 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
redbanana
Posts: 775
Lexington, Kentucky, US


. In addition to that, it's important that the photographer not become part of the ceremony. You should not be noticed. You're lucky the bride didn't come unglued with you sitting in the front row, or more likely the mother of the bride. Fine if you got permission first though.

I don't agree with this and it has never been true with any weddings I've shot a principle or secondary. Our job is to get the shot of the moment. During those situations I don't think you need to camp out in front row standing but you need to be up front on a knee grabbing that shot. If I shoot alone I'm front and center on a knee I grab what I need then move around to the back for different angles to tell the story.

Jan 13 13 10:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Faces2Die4 Photography
Posts: 426
Houston, Texas, US


You couldn't pay me to shoot a wedding.  smile
Jan 13 13 10:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KA Style
Posts: 1,549
Syracuse, New York, US


Anthony J Deffina wrote:
The two things you need to be concerned with are if you are equipped with what you need to get the job done right and do you have a style that sets you apart from the crowd.

This.

I just dont sweat all that.. I have fun and handle my business, thats how it should be.

Jan 13 13 10:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Light Writer
Posts: 18,387
Oakland, California, US


I wonder if the gear helps. I suspect having all that you need is sufficient. The purpose for the end product is the deciding factor. If what you have meets your needs to produce the end result you need, then having the next best thing isn't that important. If you want sliver gelatin prints and only have a digital camera, then you have to do the extra work to get that result. If you have an 8x10 film camera, then you have to do the extra work to get the jpeg uploaded.

Maybe there's a balance amongst what you want, what you need, what you can afford and the amount of time and effort you're willing to put in to get the final result you want?

The gear definitely has appeal, but if you spend money on features you don't need or don't use, there's no need to spend the money.
Jan 13 13 10:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


i have a 50f1.4 and a 24-70f2.8 (and a 100f2) but i like using my 17-40 at the reception. but you are right that f4 gets a bit iffy (focusing definitely slows down) so that's why i'd like to have the 16-35f2.8 (or maybe just a wider prime than the 50). in dark conditions even f2.8 can be slow. but maybe a MK III or D600/800 or even 6D would have enough ISO to make f4 more feasible.

the wife did do some 15mm fisheye shots (and shots with her x-pro1) from the balcony. but do photographers really do the entire wedding that way? the bride and groom are just specks (although of course you can crop in later on some shots). and i've had churches so dark that i didn't want to risk using my 70-200f2.8 from the balcony (the one time i did the photos were just awful -- the 5D MK II is horrible at ISO6400).

the groom wanted us to come up on stage during the certificate signing (part of the ceremony) but i said that probably wouldn't be a good idea.

the front row where i sat was clear. i probably wouldn't have made that choice if it were full. i turned off my flash. my other options were to be way at the back (or up in the balcony) or off to the side where my shots would have been blocked by a lectern. i guess i could have set up a tripod in the balcony and used a 70-200. but because of previous bad experiences with church balconies i didn't even bring a 70-200 along this time (lesson learned).

we have spares although my spare body is a 5D MK I and that only goes to ISO1600 native. i'd like to get a 2nd MK II when i can afford it. the wife runs around with an x-pro1 but that's not an action/flash camera.

i've only done 6 weddings so i'm a newbie. i never even wanted to be an event shooter but that's what people are hiring us for (boudoir is dead, families only want to pay $100 and the senior market is tough to crack). i've learned that church weddings are very different from civil. there's a lot to know and learn and a lot of decisions to make on each one. and each one is different. each venue is different. each couple is different. each church lady and pastor is different (this one was a lady and she seemed cool).

Anthony J Deffina wrote:
1) No wedding photographer should be shooting without at at least one 2.8 or wider in their bag. As you've learned, ability to shoot in low light without a flash is a must.

2) Shooting from a balcony is common place, at least part of the time. Wide shots of the ceremony are very important. In addition to that, it's important that the photographer not become part of the ceremony. You should not be noticed. You're lucky the bride didn't come unglued with you sitting in the front row, or more likely the mother of the bride. Fine if you got permission first though.

3) You should also be sure to have two of everything with you. Don't know if you did or did not but always be sure to.

4) Camera capabilities will always get better, that's life. You will always run across someone with new or better. The two things you need to be concerned with are if you are equipped with what you need to get the job done right and do you have a style that sets you apart from the crowd.

Jan 13 13 10:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


the funny thing is we have people come up to us and say "you did such a great job today" and they haven't even seen any of the photos yet. they just saw us working hard to get some (hopefully) good shots.

Light Writer wrote:
The gear definitely has appeal, but if you spend money on features you don't need or don't use, there's no need to spend the money.

Jan 13 13 11:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dcsmooth
Posts: 1,150
Detroit, Michigan, US


They don't necessarily need to have better gear, although in many cases like school graduations and weddings I see guests with some very high quality cameras and have to wonder if they know how to use them or not.

My wife and I were at a wedding last summer when someone in the bride's family mentioned it would be nice if the couple could have arranged to get a video of the ceremony, which was in a small local hall.  A few years ago I had given a Canon A590IS (just a decent $125 consumer point and shoot but has video) to the bride's mother, which she had brought with her but was not going to use since she was in the ceremony. I handed it to the bride's cousin (about 35ish) who seemed to be a sensible choice for having a chance to succeed with this adventure. She said that she had never done any photography or video work before and did not own a camera other than her cell phone.  I told her this was nearly foolproof if she could follow simple directions, just so she would be confident that this would work out.

I showed her how to start and stop the video, and told her the main thing is to keep as still as you can unless following action like walking down the aisle, and to watch the LCD screen to keep the subjects in the frame.  That was it, less than a minute worth of instructions and suggestions.

Everyone was totally amazed at the quality of the video, which looks far better than we could have done with pro equipment 20 years ago. It isn't rocket science for an average person to do good work with consumer grade cameras that are not terribly expensive.
Jan 13 13 11:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


the wife needed my help with shooting the dress so i handed my camera to one of the groomsmen and told him to snap away while i was gone. put those guests to work!

regarding video we had a goprohero3 (silver) up on the stage. it worked great although it's so wide angle that it's hard to get it close to the action. and instead of the beautiful singer it recorded mostly stomping footsteps of the candle lighting girls. still, it's kind of a cool gadget. i could see putting two or three on the stage.

dcsmooth wrote:
I showed her how to start and stop the video, and told her the main thing is to keep as still as you can unless following action like walking down the aisle, and to watch the LCD screen to keep the subjects in the frame.  That was it, less than a minute worth of instructions and suggestions.

Jan 13 13 11:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Light Writer
Posts: 18,387
Oakland, California, US


twoharts wrote:
the funny thing is we have people come up to us and say "you did such a great job today" and they haven't even seen any of the photos yet. they just saw us working hard to get some (hopefully) good shots.

From their perspective, you didn't fall into the font, knock over the cross, break the bride's leg, or otherwise get in the way. LOL So to them you were an invisible part of the experience, always around getting the shot, without intruding into the event.

"Good job, I didn't notice you at all." LOL
smile

Jan 13 13 11:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


exactly! we had one bride call us photography ninjas (we like to dress in black). but hopefully without the swords and blood part.

this is where the x-pro1 excels. i doubt the guests even realize the wife is part of the team that has been hired. it looks like a fancy point&shoot.

Light Writer wrote:
"Good job, I didn't notice you at all." LOL
smile

Jan 13 13 11:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Anthony J Deffina
Posts: 80
Shingle Springs, California, US


Photosbycj wrote:

. In addition to that, it's important that the photographer not become part of the ceremony. You should not be noticed. You're lucky the bride didn't come unglued with you sitting in the front row, or more likely the mother of the bride. Fine if you got permission first though.

I don't agree with this and it has never been true with any weddings I've shot a principle or secondary. Our job is to get the shot of the moment. During those situations I don't think you need to camp out in front row standing but you need to be up front on a knee grabbing that shot. If I shoot alone I'm front and center on a knee I grab what I need then move around to the back for different angles to tell the story.

I agree but I took it as the OP was sitting up front for most of the ceremony. You only need to be there for a brief moment although very often I shoot with a 70-200 at a distance for even the kiss.

Jan 13 13 11:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,078
Catskill, New York, US


You'll run into that at sporting events too. It's been said a million times, the photographers vision and experience makes the image, not the gear.

Yes, showing up to a high end gig with a point and shoot might get you some strange looks BUT if your work speaks for itself then people will stop questioning you.

You get the point. Remember, and I don't know who to quote for this but the best camera in the world is the one you have with you. or something like that.

Make magic and no one will really care what gear it was shot with. You know this, why am I telling you.
Jan 13 13 11:19 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Karl JW Johnston
Posts: 9,313
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


twoharts wrote:
maybe that has always been the case.

yup, nothing new. imagine the same malarkey spewed 10 years ago over digital, and 60 some years prior from now about 35 mm film slrs big_smile

the thing your team should be concerned about is the root of your team's concern..that's the real concern here, although, presents  entertainment for us

Jan 13 13 11:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wolfy4u
Posts: 1,075
Grand Junction, Colorado, US


Great photography is all about a little rectangle and the light that gets to that little
rectangle and what needs to be archived.
Neither of these things are particularly dependent (light maybe to some degree( on expensive equipment.
If an amateur doesn't understand how to crop that rectangle, he can't compete with the pro.
Btw, one of the major jobs of the wedding photographer is to know what needs to be photographed and to not miss getting a pic of Aunt Tilly. The guests tend to only shoot what they want or what's right in front of them. The pro gets all the shots.
Jan 13 13 11:22 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Anthony J Deffina
Posts: 80
Shingle Springs, California, US


twoharts wrote:
i have a 50f1.4 and a 24-70f2.8 (and a 100f2) but i like using my 17-40 at the reception. but you are right that f4 gets a bit iffy (focusing definitely slows down) so that's why i'd like to have the 16-35f2.8 (or maybe just a wider prime than the 50). in dark conditions even f2.8 can be slow. but maybe a MK III or D600/800 or even 6D would have enough ISO to make f4 more feasible.

the wife did do some 15mm fisheye shots (and shots with her x-pro1) from the balcony. but do photographers really do the entire wedding that way? the bride and groom are just specks (although of course you can crop in later on some shots). and i've had churches so dark that i didn't want to risk using my 70-200f2.8 from the balcony (the one time i did the photos were just awful -- the 5D MK II is horrible at ISO6400).

the groom wanted us to come up on stage during the certificate signing (part of the ceremony) but i said that probably wouldn't be a good idea.

the front row where i sat was clear. i probably wouldn't have made that choice if it were full. i turned off my flash. my other options were to be way at the back (or up in the balcony) or off to the side where my shots would have been blocked by a lectern. i guess i could have set up a tripod in the balcony and used a 70-200. but because of previous bad experiences with church balconies i didn't even bring a 70-200 along this time (lesson learned).

we have spares although my spare body is a 5D MK I and that only goes to ISO1600 native. i'd like to get a 2nd MK II when i can afford it. the wife runs around with an x-pro1 but that's not an action/flash camera.

i've only done 6 weddings so i'm a newbie. i never even wanted to be an event shooter but that's what people are hiring us for (boudoir is dead, families only want to pay $100 and the senior market is tough to crack). i've learned that church weddings are very different from civil. there's a lot to know and learn and a lot of decisions to make on each one. and each one is different. each venue is different. each couple is different. each church lady and pastor is different (this one was a lady and she seemed cool).


No. definately not the entire wedding that way. If your wife got some wide angles from there, you're good.

I just switched from a 5D to a 5DIII and yes, it's much better with the higher ISO so F4, while still not ideal, is workable now! It also focuses much better in low light.

Don't let the uncle bobs get to you. They're always around and always will be. Develope your own style and enjoy!

Jan 13 13 11:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


to me that's one reason weddings are tiring. i'm on high alert trying not to miss something. and i still have times where i zone out for a second and miss something or fail to anticipate something (especially kisses, like one where the dad walked the bride down the aisle and then i was shooting them from behind but didn't notice that he kissed her until it was too late). sometimes i'll ask for a do-over but you can't do that during the ceremony!

Wolfy4u wrote:
Btw, one of the major jobs of the wedding photographer is to know what needs to be photographed and to not miss getting a pic of Aunt Tilly. The guests tend to only shoot what they want or what's right in front of them. The pro gets all the shots.

Jan 13 13 11:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
terrysphotocountry
Posts: 4,046
Rochester, New York, US


He just ha$ deeper pocket$ that you! smile`
Jan 13 13 11:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


the 16-35 is like $1,500 (plus people never seem to say anything good about it) so i'm torn between getting that or putting the money into a newer body where maybe my 17-40 will suffice.

can you get the selected focus point to light up red with the MK III? i've seen posts saying that's a showstopper flaw for low light shooting.

in this case the uncle bob had a suggestion for re-orienting the rings for better composition and his suggestion was good so we went with it. i guess you just try to work with these folks rather than against them (unless they are gunning for you).

Anthony J Deffina wrote:
I just switched from a 5D to a 5DIII and yes, it's much better with the higher ISO so F4, while still not ideal, is workable now! It also focuses much better in low light.

Don't let the uncle bobs get to you. They're always around and always will be. Develope your own style and enjoy!

Jan 13 13 11:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,520
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


Karl Johnston wrote:

yup, nothing new. imagine the same malarkey spewed 10 years ago over digital, and 60 some years prior from now about 35 mm film slrs big_smile

the thing your team should be concerned about is the root of your team's concern..that's the real concern here, although, presents  entertainment for us

there have always been Uncle Bobs and Uncle Joes who happened to be doctors or lawyers and could afford the best gear. Some even loved photography.  Nothing new at all.

Jan 13 13 11:32 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Laura UnBound
Posts: 26,981
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Professionals (people worth paying/people who make their living at photography) have always needed to be more than just their gear.
Jan 13 13 11:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,737
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


If it was just a matter of gear we would be in real trouble. My wife`s boss one of the VP`s  of their bank, has the new 5DIII...woop-ti-do. The guy is 37 and can buy pretty much anything he wants.

He asks every now and then why my images are always more clear and vibrant than his.

Uncle Bob`s know what it takes to make it in the wedding business. There is more than showing up for the wedding day and taking snap shots.

As for your Fuji...many stellar wedding images get published from cameras you probably haven`t used in 5 to 10 years...if you have been around that long. Like the Canon 20D.
Jan 13 13 11:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hero Foto
Posts: 878
Phoenix, Arizona, US


I don't shoot weddings. BUT, I can relate as a sports shooter. When shooting youth sports, you walk up to a sideline and notice that the majority of the parents have better gear and glass than you do.

Then you question why are you even there?

Then realize: "Oh yeah, $$$$$$$ ... they're paying me."

smile
Jan 13 13 11:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


here's a couple straight out of camera shots we posted last night before passing out:
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set= … 723&type=1
(i can see i need to straighten that candle shot -- would have been hard to get that from the balcony i think)

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/398061_10151203863617724_738734103_n.jpg
Jan 13 13 11:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,171
Salem, Oregon, US


i remember when guys were shooting weddings with the olympus E-1 (5 megapixels?)

i started with a nikon D70 and had a 30D at one point and really liked the shots i got with the canon. but i don't think it would even go up to ISO6400? the stuff i'm being hired for lately seems to be mostly shooting in dark places.

and i remember when the 30D came out people saying they liked the 20D (even the 10D) better. so it goes.

for me it's all about high ISO now. to shoot the couple in the dark in the Bel Air last night the wife had the fuji at ISO6400, f1.4 and the shots had a bit of motion blur but otherwise looked really good. i honestly didn't think a small sensor could do that.

Illuminate wrote:
As for your Fuji...many stellar wedding images get published from cameras you probably haven`t used in 5 to 10 years...if you have been around that long. Like the Canon 20D.

Jan 13 13 11:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,113
Tampa, Florida, US


Did you ask him if he drives a red convertible corvette too?

The response to that person is, "The camera is just a tool. Much like yourself." Just make sure he isn't the brides father.
Jan 13 13 11:44 am  Link  Quote 
Artist/Painter
MainePaintah
Posts: 1,666
Saco, Maine, US


Photosbycj wrote:

. In addition to that, it's important that the photographer not become part of the ceremony. You should not be noticed. You're lucky the bride didn't come unglued with you sitting in the front row, or more likely the mother of the bride. Fine if you got permission first though.

I don't agree with this and it has never been true with any weddings I've shot a principle or secondary. Our job is to get the shot of the moment. During those situations I don't think you need to camp out in front row standing but you need to be up front on a knee grabbing that shot. If I shoot alone I'm front and center on a knee I grab what I need then move around to the back for different angles to tell the story".

+1 about being on a knee!

I briefly shot weddings in NYC when I was a photographer in the 1980's. I remember that the day following a wedding shoot, I could barely walk because I spent most of the wedding trying to be unobtrusive and shooting from being on one knee and scurrying around all day!

Jan 13 13 11:45 am  Link  Quote 
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