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Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


So some of you may know that I recently did a shoot which resulted in a bunch of images that appeared to have focus / softness issues. It was basically a wasted day. However out of the 125 frames shot, I like these.

Do any of these do anything for you?
http://alturl.com/bcxzc

I'm basically trying to decide whether I should just scrap the entire shoot or keep a couple of these.
Jan 16 13 10:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,657
Orlando, Florida, US


Unless you get VERY creative with the retouching, I'd say it's a scrap.

Maybe you could use some of the REALLY out of focus ones and get a little abstract with the editing.


Next time, ensure that your checklist includes making sure your lens and camera are set to autofocus.
Jan 16 13 10:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:
Unless you get VERY creative with the retouching, I'd say it's a scrap.

Maybe you could use some of the REALLY out of focus ones and get a little abstract with the editing.


Next time, ensure that your checklist includes making sure your lens and camera are set to autofocus.

Yeah they were. Here's the whole story
http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=875436

The examples are no longer available

Jan 16 13 10:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Caveman Creations
Posts: 580
Fort Worth, Texas, US


I'd say scrap it as well. As stated before, you could get creative, but if this is not your best work, don't show it. Ever!

That being said, you should still compensate your llama if that was agreed upon. Either deliver what was expected, or schedule a re-shoot. Personally, I would lean toward the re-shoot. Just because you had problems, or don't like the images, doesn't mean she didn't give her all. wink
Jan 16 13 10:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,657
Orlando, Florida, US


Yikes.  Read through that thread.  What a mess.

The things I gathered...
Your autofocus may have been set to C (continuous) and may have refocused after you found her face and then recomposed.  This seems most likely as other elements in some of the shots are in focus.

Shooting wide open with the 50 f/1.8 I've found to be a little soft for full length images.  It doesn't get ultra sharp for me until f/4 or 5.6.

There's the possible issue of finding center focus point and then recomposing, altering the focal plane when the camera moves.  The solution to that is to move your in-camera focus point more near to your focus target while composing.  Only important when shooting very wide open.

It also appears that it was very hazy/foggy/misty for this shoot.  Just another thing to multiply any other issue going on.




Best of luck figuring out what really happened and how to make sure it doesn't happen again.  Perhaps using your LCD monitor and zooming way in to check focus should be part of your process going forward.

We all goof up.  I've shot half a 6 hour shoot once at ISO1600 (on a D2x -- horrible) because I forgot to check.  I also shot an ENTIRE shoot on Basic, Small JPG (no RAW) because I didn't check.  I've shot for 20 minutes before I realized it was on manual focus.

We learn.




best of luck salvaging one or more of these shots.
Jan 16 13 10:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


I was a "guest" shooter on this. It was actually a friend of mine who invited me to shoot with him. So no compensation necessary. I'd love to work with her again.

The hazy misty day was intentional. That's how it all came together. He had a cancellation for another shoot, called me up and said hey, it's misty and hazy out I think we can get some good shots at this location bla bla bla.

I was bummed out with the results to say the least. Not the models fault at all
Jan 16 13 11:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DanaBarrett Photography
Posts: 1,030
Franklin, Tennessee, US


The only one that's a maybe is the second one.  it looks like the focus is close there and it could get a fun edit. 

I would scrap the rest.  I would definitely try shooting in those conditions again and see if it happens again or if it was a fluke.
Jan 16 13 11:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jeffrey M Fletcher
Posts: 4,344
Asheville, North Carolina, US


There's one from the back that seems to have a nice nostalgic, receding look that could be played with. I can't see anything on the ones of the model's front.
Jan 17 13 05:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
E Delsigne Photography
Posts: 30
Los Angeles, California, US


Either creative post work or scrap it.

You want your portfolio to be as well rounded as possible!

Good luck and happy shooting!

Erin Delsigne Photography

https://www.facebook.com/EDPhotos
Jan 18 13 10:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yum Yum Photo
Posts: 442
Park Ridge, New Jersey, US


Yes it is pretty much a scrap.... On those misty far back pictures the pose is important.... I would cut back on the heavy eyeliner....

Everyone has these sort of days.... Well I have had them not as much now....

I would next time fool with the flash.... Just a thought...
Jan 18 13 10:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan K Photography
Posts: 5,466
STATEN ISLAND, New York, US


I think you can make something cool with the second one.
Jan 18 13 10:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,083
Catskill, New York, US


Dan K Photography wrote:
I think you can make something cool with the second one.

That's one of the ones I fell in  love with from the start. I kept going back and forth and every day, it was one that I decided needed to stay in the loop.

What are you thinking ?

Jan 18 13 08:18 pm  Link  Quote 
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