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Model
V for Victory Modeling
Posts: 436
Roseville, California, US


What is your max in terms of shoot length? I usually prefer shoots not to last longer than 2-3 hours, especially if it's only TF. I start getting tired and hungry if the shoot seems to go on forever. If it's a longer shoot than 3 hours I think a break is warranted before continuing.
Jan 17 13 04:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 10,083
Santa Ana, California, US


Typically in studio with trying to shoot both fashion and beauty, with two distinct makeup and hair looks, is 4-5 hours ( 1/2 day ).

But realize, the model is in MU/hair for probably 1.5 hours of that. So when everything is said and done, the actual time the model is getting flashed at, is probably maybe 2-2.5 hours.
Jan 17 13 04:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 171
Rochester, New York, US


I find that I want at least two hours, and like 3.  Four is good if there's time to stop and snack.  And any photog that has a model in for that length of time should provide food of some sort, especially if it is TF.

And what John Allen said.  Very true.
Jan 17 13 04:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Rosemarie Bennet
Posts: 144
Warrington, Pennsylvania, US


I've done shoots as long as 8-9 hours, but that's when there's a lot of location hunting and at least a break for a real meal. Usually shoots are 3-4 hours.
Jan 17 13 04:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DG at studio47
Posts: 2,365
East Ridge, Tennessee, US


prefer about 3hrs max if model[s] arrive with MUA already done. However,........I have done 5, 7, and 10 hr shoots. emphasis on "have Done". started one night at 10pm [per models request] and finished the next morning at 0300, took model and escort to breakfast.
Jan 17 13 04:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Marcus Studios
Posts: 8,470
Los Angeles, California, US


I schedule my TF shoots to start around noon or 1:00pm

I try to finish by about 7 -7:30ish

sometimes it takes longer

KM
Jan 17 13 04:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gary Melton
Posts: 6,391
Dallas, Texas, US


vbabe wrote:
What is your max in terms of shoot length? I usually prefer shoots not to last longer than 2-3 hours, especially if it's only TF. I start getting tired and hungry if the shoot seems to go on forever. If it's a longer shoot than 3 hours I think a break is warranted before continuing.

I totally cannot handle any shoot longer than 96-100 hours. 
Everything justs seems totally redundant by then and I need a double bacon cheeseburger for sure just to keep my bacon-blood levels up.

Jan 17 13 04:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 171
Rochester, New York, US


Rosemarie Bennet wrote:
I've done shoots as long as 8-9 hours, but that's when there's a lot of location hunting and at least a break for a real meal. Usually shoots are 3-4 hours.

Location hunting? While you are on the shoot?  Do you mean, "hey, let's try the trees over there", or, "we need to find an old shipwreck...let's get in the car!"?

Jan 17 13 04:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jean Renard Photography
Posts: 2,050
Los Angeles, California, US


you shoot until it is done.  We do a lot of film and those days can be very long 12 hours is normal 18 is not unheard of
Jan 17 13 04:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 171
Rochester, New York, US


Jean Renard Photography wrote:
you shoot until it is done.  We do a lot of film and those days can be very long 12 hours is normal 18 is not unheard of

That was my experience shooting for paying customers.  That was also my reason for leaving the film/video production world.  But you're correct... You shoot till it is done.

But the OP vbabe mentioned TF.  I try to keep TF to 3ish hours for the model's sake. But If the model wants more, we can go the 96 to 100 hours mentioned above.  smile

Jan 17 13 04:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
- Aina -
Posts: 740
Redlands, California, US


The longest shoot I've had was... six hours?
Typical shoots are 2-3.
Jan 17 13 04:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
London Fog
Posts: 6,770
London, England, United Kingdom


Jean Renard Photography wrote:
you shoot until it is done.  We do a lot of film and those days can be very long 12 hours is normal 18 is not unheard of

18hr shoot, you are kidding right?

Jan 17 13 05:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 171
Rochester, New York, US


London Fog wrote:
18hr shoot, you are kidding right?

It is not uncommon for a film or video shoot to have a crew call time of 5 or 6 AM and have the day's shoot end around 9 or 10 PM.  In many cases, the actors or models are in makeup at the same time the crew is called.

My longest series of shooting days was a week doing a documentary.  6a to 10p every day for a week.

Jan 17 13 05:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
London Fog
Posts: 6,770
London, England, United Kingdom


FiveOne November wrote:
It is not uncommon for a film or video shoot to have a crew call time of 5 or 6 AM and have the day's shoot end around 9 or 10 PM.  In many cases, the actors or llamas are in makeup at the same time the crew is called.

My longest series of shooting days was a week doing a documentary.  6a to 10p every day for a week.

Yes, but that's different to a 'photoshoot'. Hollywood actors and non mainstream actors are used to working 18-20hr days, hence the massive pay!

A typical 'fashion shoot' is either half a day (4-5hrs) or a full day (8hrs), at least that's how I work it. I can't handle more than 8hrs with any llama, regardless of how eager or stunning she is!

8hrs and I'm done, I'm off home faster than Taylor Swift can say 'here's my next boyfriend'!

Jan 17 13 05:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Marcus Studios
Posts: 8,470
Los Angeles, California, US


London Fog wrote:

18hr shoot, you are kidding right?

In the days before digital and photoshop, you had to get everything right in the camera . . . and that took a lot of time.

12 to 18 hours is pretty much what we all did BD (Before Digital)

Jan 17 13 05:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Lady Pelvic
Posts: 1,408
Orlando, Florida, US


Rosemarie Bennet wrote:
I've done shoots as long as 8-9 hours, but that's when there's a lot of location hunting and at least a break for a real meal. Usually shoots are 3-4 hours.

Same. Honestly, it was a full day!
But we did three entirely different looks (Hair and make up). Three entirely different locations. So..it was understandable.

But...we did get a pizza break in there. ;B

Jan 17 13 05:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Bunny Bombshell
Posts: 11,752
Huntington, West Virginia, US


If it's just one look, maximum of 2 hours
Jan 17 13 05:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
James Crafford
Posts: 63
Carmel, New York, US


When I shoot headshots for pay in NYC, i.e., I do it in about an hour.  If I am working with a "trade" and having a good time mutually, it could be 2 or 3 hours or even more.
Jan 17 13 05:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jean Renard Photography
Posts: 2,050
Los Angeles, California, US


In fashion long days are normal even for testings or editorial work, sunrise at say 6am means make up at 4am then sunset at 5pm with stuff in between.

I would imagine that for testings too, I'd want things to be totally perfect. I tend to be much harder on myself than clients, so on a Test I imagine I would work even harder...
Jan 17 13 05:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MMR Digital
Posts: 1,694
Doylestown, Pennsylvania, US


I work for a small company- 2 to 3 hours gets it all done as far as shooting. 5 to 8+ hours setting up, breaking down.
Jan 17 13 05:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
London Fog
Posts: 6,770
London, England, United Kingdom


Ken Marcus Studios wrote:

In the days before digital and photoshop, you had to get everything right in the camera . . . and that took a lot of time.

12 to 18 hours is pretty much what we all did BD (Before Digital)

Yes, agree Ken, but in those days it was like an event, so that kind of made the long day fun and exciting. The model turned up, usually 2hrs late (still expecting to leave at the time planned!), the Hair/MUA would show up and then they'd all hide away for 2hrs before re-surfacing!

All the while the photographer would sort out the lighting, choose which 10 or 20 rolls of 36exp film to use, do some light meter readings, read Vogue, maybe zip out for a smoke (no internet, ipads, iphones in those days) and then finally get started.

It was great!

Jan 17 13 05:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jeffrey M Fletcher
Posts: 4,344
Asheville, North Carolina, US


It's rare that my shoots are less than 4 hours, I'll go to 6 or 8 on occasion.
Jan 17 13 05:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vector 38
Posts: 8,296
Austin, Texas, US


vbabe wrote:
What is your max in terms of shoot length?

hair, makeup and wardrobe settled prior to my picking up the camera, i book in 2 hr intervals, generally leaving approx. 30 mins on either side to cover last minute details.

Rosemarie Bennet wrote:
I've done shoots as long as 8-9 hours, but that's when there's a lot of location hunting ...

my team handles location scouting, including securing any required permissions/permits, prior to the shoot; don't see that the model should have to shoulder this responsibility.

Jan 17 13 06:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 171
Rochester, New York, US


London Fog wrote:

Yes, but that's different to a 'photoshoot'. Hollywood actors and non mainstream actors are used to working 18-20hr days, hence the massive pay!

A typical 'fashion shoot' is either half a day (4-5hrs) or a full day (8hrs), at least that's how I work it. I can't handle more than 8hrs with any model, regardless of how eager or stunning she is!

8hrs and I'm done, I'm off home faster than Taylor Swift can say 'here's my next boyfriend'!

Which is why I quit doing production and earned nights and weekend with my family!

Jan 17 13 06:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,868
Olivet, Michigan, US


vbabe wrote:
What is your max in terms of shoot length? I usually prefer shoots not to last longer than 2-3 hours, especially if it's only TF. I start getting tired and hungry if the shoot seems to go on forever. If it's a longer shoot than 3 hours I think a break is warranted before continuing.

I am a fan of breaks, and I get distracted a lot anyway, but my typical TF shoot is 4-6 hours, and at least as many are longer as are shorter.

Jan 17 13 06:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Most of my tests run from around midday to whenever we're finished.

If the model has a train to catch that will usually be around 7-8pm but if she's staying over at my house (which most do these days) then it could be any time really.

Why stop if you're having fun and getting cool results?




Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com
Jan 17 13 07:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Andrew Thomas Evans
Posts: 24,078
Toulon, Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur, France


vbabe wrote:
What is your max in terms of shoot length?

For normal residential/consumer stuff about 4 hours max, after that everyone starts to drift a little with their attention.

One of the longer ones was about 5 or 6 hours for 2 images. 15 year old model, I think her mom was there for some of it, full crew, but in the end we got what we needed.



Andrew Thomas Evans
www.andrewthomasevans.com

Jan 17 13 07:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
V for Victory Modeling
Posts: 436
Roseville, California, US


For those of you mentioning film and video, is it normal to spend 18-20 hours on a 5 minute scene? Just curious as a photographer I worked with mentioned he does this with video work. I was wondering if that was why he took 2 hours to shoot one pose while messing with his equipment 75% of the shoot. :-P
Jan 17 13 07:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Brian T Rickey
Posts: 4,007
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


Considering it takes me a couple of hours to get makeup and wardrobe, it depends on how many looks I have planned on.
Jan 17 13 07:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
R Michael Walker
Posts: 11,985
Costa Mesa, California, US


vbabe wrote:
What is your max in terms of shoot length? I usually prefer shoots not to last longer than 2-3 hours, especially if it's only TF. I start getting tired and hungry if the shoot seems to go on forever. If it's a longer shoot than 3 hours I think a break is warranted before continuing.

You get plenty of down time on my shoots. It's a 2+ hour drive to the location. Then I usually shoot less than 30 minutes at each location. About 3-5 locations make it a day and that means a bit more driving in between. On the way in we stop for snacks. I bring water and on the way out we usually stop for real food in one of the little towns. So it take ALL day..but lots of breaks, snacks and good images for all!

Jan 17 13 07:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,612
Los Angeles, California, US


R Michael Walker wrote:
You get plenty of down time on my shoots. It's a 2+ hour drive to the location. Then I usually shoot less than 30 minutes at each location. About 3-5 locations make it a day and that means a bit more driving in between. On the way in we stop for snacks. I bring water and on the way out we usually stop for real food in one of the little towns. So it take ALL day..but lots of breaks, snacks and good images for all!

hienvy  Miiiike!!!

*   *    *    *

OP, it's interesting that you said you're less likely to shoot at length if it's "only TFP".  Usually my longest shoots, are trade shoots.  Because I am having so much fun, and invested in the end result on an entirely different level, I barely notice the hours roll by.  Trade shoots give me the images I need to make money later.  Every single image you see on my profile, except for two...all trade shoots.

My longest paid shoot was 8 hours (a few times for workshops).  My longest trade shoots have been up to...12 hours or so?  With Mike!

Jan 17 13 07:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
R Michael Walker
Posts: 11,985
Costa Mesa, California, US


vbabe wrote:
For those of you mentioning film and video, is it normal to spend 18-20 hours on a 5 minute scene? Just curious as a photographer I worked with mentioned he does this with video work. I was wondering if that was why he took 2 hours to shoot one pose while messing with his equipment 75% of the shoot. :-P

Yep..if it's a complex scene it could take longer. Camera moves, light changes, set and location changes. Look at a movie. A finished length of 1 1/2 to 2 hrs and it take months to shoot. Likely that long or longer in post as well.

Jan 17 13 07:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
R Michael Walker
Posts: 11,985
Costa Mesa, California, US


Shandra Stark wrote:

hienvy  Miiiike!!!

*   *    *    *

Usually my longest shoots, are trade shoots.  Because I am having so much fun, and invested in the end result on an entirely different level, I barely notice the hours roll by.  My longest paid shoot was 8 hours (a few times...workshops).  My longest trade shoots have been up to...12 hours or so?  With Mike!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Miss ya! hienvy

Jan 17 13 07:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,612
Los Angeles, California, US


R Michael Walker wrote:

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Miss ya! hienvy

And I, you! 

Jan 17 13 07:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bravo Magic Images
Posts: 765
Temple City, California, US


I try not to shoot over the limited amount of time, unless every aspect of the shoot had be preset before hand with outfits back drops themes and what have you. other than that I think 2 hours shoutd about do it.
Jan 17 13 07:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,612
Los Angeles, California, US


You get tired after three hours?  Do you mean bored, or actually tired?

If you're getting hungry...you should bring snacks!!

I bring snacks to every shoot.  Smoothies, nuts, yogurt, a sandwich, fruit...all at once.  No one has ever questioned or minded my snacking.  Smoothies are the absolute best, especially on shorter shoots where there won't be a break longer than a few minutes at a time.
Jan 17 13 07:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 171
Rochester, New York, US


vbabe wrote:
For those of you mentioning film and video, is it normal to spend 18-20 hours on a 5 minute scene? Just curious as a photographer I worked with mentioned he does this with video work. I was wondering if that was why he took 2 hours to shoot one pose while messing with his equipment 75% of the shoot. :-P

With scripted feature films and multiple camera angles in single-camera shoot, "a page a day" was the norm. Two pages was great, three amazing. Shoots for TV go much faster.

Jan 18 13 04:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TomFRohwer
Posts: 657
Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany


vbabe wrote:
What is your max in terms of shoot length?

~17 hours. With breaks and catering in between of course, and mua work and changing and adjusting outfits and some dry runs etc.

Of course it depends of the specific job and circumstances but in general I think in half-day and full-day shootings. Not in hours.

Jan 18 13 04:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
D-Light
Posts: 608
Newcastle, Limerick, Ireland


In my opinion, anything less than three hours is a waste. The model will be in hair/MUA for an hour before you start. Then, if there's a change of outfit and there almost always is, this will take more time and the MUA will have to do a touch up, allow at least 20 mins but more likely 30. So, in a three hour shoot, with one change of outfit, you'll only be shooting 1.5 hours.

When planning a shoot, I first decide how long I need the model in front of the camera and then add time for make up, hair, changes and touch ups. This usually ends up being four to five hours and sometimes six.

As stated by others, a break with food is important, when working for this length of time. Add this time to your shoot also.
Jan 18 13 05:08 am  Link  Quote 
Model
sasweets
Posts: 404
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


Make up always take 1.5 hours for me. For each look an hour is what I've been timed around to get a decent few shots. So minimum 2.5 hours and maximum 6-7 hours in studio/ 9-10 hours on different locations.
Jan 18 13 05:23 am  Link  Quote 
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