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Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


Now that I'm dealing with hundreds of current and past clients and over 100,000 photos, I'm again looking at my workflow and most importantly FILE NAME strategy.

One thing I have learned over the years is that taking the time to properly name files is WORTH IT when a client asks for an old photo, or I'm building a photobook, or a "my best shots of the year" kind of thing.  By creating a unique string in the filename, I can find any set of files immediately, for example all of my photos from the last K9 Cancer walk have within the filename _K9CancerWalk2012_, so I can search that in Windows File Explorer without depending on Lightroom or any other outside software.

As recently discussed in another threat, I often need to know the dimensions of the original file (*after* my cropping), so I am adding that to the end of my filenames.  Since I'm making that change, I was wondering if anyone else had some clever file naming methods.

Here is what I'm doing now:
STEP 1: Using Adobe Camera Raw, select/delete/edit/crop RAW files.

STEP 2: Using Adobe Bridge, "batch rename" all RAW files in this manner:
[year][month]_EventName_[sequence#].ext
Example: 201202_OscarsRedCarpet_1234.CR2

STEP 3: Using Photoshop "Image Processor", export RAW to .JPG (no resizing)

STEP 4: Using Adobe Bridge, "batch rename" all JPG files in this manner:
[preserved filename]_[Width]x[Height].ext
Example: 201202_OscarsRedCarpet_1234_5454x4392.jpg

STEP 5: Using Photoshop "Image Processor", export all .JPG from Step 4
to "online media" folder (resized to 920x920, EXIF copyright added, watermark added) to create files suitable for email and social media

STEP 6: Using Photoshop "Contact Sheet II", create contact sheet
for clients, explaining to them that the last part of the filename is the
original file resolution.  Also, in some cases, create a .zip file of all .jpg's
create in step 5 to give to client for image selection.

This seems to solve all of my issues, and still keeps things flexible.  I could reduce a step by renaming the RAW files with crop size, but I sometimes change the crop to print on canvas (because the image has to wrap around the frame).  One NICE surprise in Abobe Bridge's file rename process is that "dimensions" pays attention to the crops you've set!

The order of the items in the filename above make it easy to work with images when I create a photobook and copy lots of images to a new working folder - they are automatically sorted by year/month/event/sequence.

Any suggestions/comment before I begin the work of renaming my big archives?
Jan 18 13 10:31 am  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
-JAY-
Posts: 6,180
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


I just use folders. If I need a 2012 Cancer Walk photo - I open the 2012 cancer walk folder - already in sequential order in there. Dont see a purpose of anything further
Jan 18 13 10:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,078
Catskill, New York, US


I don't rename files. I sort into named folders

Year > Type (modeling, landscape, etc), month > event or client name.

Files themselves remain as they came off the card.

So I may have
2013
Modeling
Jones Family
June or maybe Christmas Photos
ADL_2039.jpg

From there I'll pick the keepers and put them in a folder called
Edit
then after the post work they go into
Done
Then if necessary
Resized
Deliver
Web
or whatever is appropriate for that project
Jan 18 13 10:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 35,962
Columbus, Ohio, US


2013-01-18 will always keep images in chronoligical order
With a prefix attached to each individual model based on their names.

Folder for each shoot dated the same as above....inside 3 more folders Raw-Edited-Web
Folder for each year
Jan 18 13 10:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


Ah, I should have mentioned my folders. Here is how I've done it:

K:/Photos
K:/Photos/2012Q2
K:/Photos/2012Q2/K9Walk
K:/Photos/2012Q2/KittyBirthday
K:/Photos/2012Q2/MeteorShower

This works for ME because I generally know roughly when I shot a photo -- say, winter of 2012 or summer of 2007.  For that reason I've divided in year into quarters, then look for the folder for that event. I used to use months, but found that to be too many.

So, if I want to see all of the photos for last year's "K9Walk", I just navigate to that folder. 

If a person emails and says "I want to buy that you took several years ago of my blue poodle you posted on FlickR to make a 30"x60" canvas", I just ask them for the filename, use Windows File Explorer to search on the name, and find it immediately.  I can also tell them the photo's resolution won't work for 30x60 but will make a great 20x30.

Also of note: I have outgrown my 3TB drive and archiving to blu-ray, so folder based organization doesn't work nearly as well.  My "really good" photos will remain on my hard drive, but by smartly naming the file I can go back and get the RAW in case I need it.
Jan 18 13 10:57 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
BMR-MUA
Posts: 548
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Dale at Killer Image wrote:
Any suggestions/comment before I begin the work of renaming my big archives?

Take a look at Filenames as a Strategy to Managing Your Image Assets

Jan 18 13 11:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KA Style
Posts: 1,549
Syracuse, New York, US


Mine go by date. I load into lightroom, backs up into my 2013 folder. I have a wedding, models, family, etc. All have a 2013 folder.

When I save for net use I label images with what it is so when I load on my website it has proper title for SE searches. Ex: Wedding Sodus bay (blogging & galleries, SM)

For clients I save label web/print etc. This is if they buy digital files/get the package with them included they dont mix up which ones print and what to share on the net.

So, Wedding>2013>1-14-2013. All the RAWS and a web/print folder, sometimes a "pre edit" folder if Im going to do PS work. I dont directly import, I save a tiff to bring into PS. Just for some fluke reason my LR crashes and burns I wont loose the work I did, its saved in the pre edit.

Some end up with a to blog folder, album, etc. Depends on the photo content/job.
Jan 18 13 11:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bob Helm Photography
Posts: 18,090
Cherry Hill, New Jersey, US


Peter Groh in the DAM book recomends using your name as you want the client to know who they licensed the photo from and who to credit. If you use the event name...well they know that already.
I use
Helm_R_yymmdd_seq#

Auto change in LR

Works well as long as you do not have a really long name wink
Jan 18 13 11:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


Robert Helm wrote:
Peter Groh in the DAM book recomends using your name as you want the client to know who they licensed the photo from and who to credit. If you use the event name...well they know that already.
I use
Helm_R_yymmdd_seq#

Auto change in LR

Works well as long as you do not have a really long name wink

I solve this by putting my name and company on the watermark on the corner of the 920x920's, and in the EXIF,  post some of them online and on FlickR, and when a client is interested zip up ALL of those into a .zip file and set it up for them to download.  That way there is no question how to contact me, even if they go nuts and post every pic to every social media on the planet.  And since it's 920x920 it's not useful for printing/commercial use.

This has proven to be successful, in fact I'm working on a contract with National Geographic right now.

Jan 18 13 11:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MC Photo
Posts: 4,144
New York, New York, US


Dale at Killer Image wrote:
Now that I'm dealing with hundreds of current and past clients and over 100,000 photos, I'm again looking at my workflow and most importantly FILE NAME strategy.

One thing I have learned over the years is that taking the time to properly name files is WORTH IT when a client asks for an old photo, or I'm building a photobook, or a "my best shots of the year" kind of thing.  By creating a unique string in the filename, I can find any set of files immediately, for example all of my photos from the last K9 Cancer walk have within the filename _K9CancerWalk2012_, so I can search that in Windows File Explorer without depending on Lightroom or any other outside software.

As recently discussed in another threat, I often need to know the dimensions of the original file (*after* my cropping), so I am adding that to the end of my filenames.  Since I'm making that change, I was wondering if anyone else had some clever file naming methods.

Here is what I'm doing now:
STEP 1: Using Adobe Camera Raw, select/delete/edit/crop RAW files.

STEP 2: Using Adobe Bridge, "batch rename" all RAW files in this manner:
[year][month]_EventName_[sequence#].ext
Example: 201202_OscarsRedCarpet_1234.CR2

STEP 3: Using Photoshop "Image Processor", export RAW to .JPG (no resizing)

STEP 4: Using Adobe Bridge, "batch rename" all JPG files in this manner:
[preserved filename]_[Width]x[Height].ext
Example: 201202_OscarsRedCarpet_1234_5454x4392.jpg

STEP 5: Using Photoshop "Image Processor", export all .JPG from Step 4
to "online media" folder (resized to 920x920, EXIF copyright added, watermark added) to create files suitable for email and social media

STEP 6: Using Photoshop "Contact Sheet II", create contact sheet
for clients, explaining to them that the last part of the filename is the
original file resolution.  Also, in some cases, create a .zip file of all .jpg's
create in step 5 to give to client for image selection.

This seems to solve all of my issues, and still keeps things flexible.  I could reduce a step by renaming the RAW files with crop size, but I sometimes change the crop to print on canvas (because the image has to wrap around the frame).  One NICE surprise in Abobe Bridge's file rename process is that "dimensions" pays attention to the crops you've set!

The order of the items in the filename above make it easy to work with images when I create a photobook and copy lots of images to a new working folder - they are automatically sorted by year/month/event/sequence.

Any suggestions/comment before I begin the work of renaming my big archives?

I would never separate the image number from the file type in the way you have the dimensions between the image number and file type.

If you're managing final outputted files, I'd label folders with the name and dimensions.

The only change I'd consider to the file name is adding the date as a series of numbers, like 011813, or possibly with the year first for sorting through lists.

I make a new folder and new Lightroom catalog for every shoot. That keep all the parts of each shooting the same place, and it's easy to backup. I also keep a few master catalogs that are collections of the best of from each shoot where I've exported  the files and previews, but not the source files.

Jan 18 13 12:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


MC Photo wrote:

I would never separate the image number from the file type in the way you have the dimensions between the image number and file type.

If you're managing final outputted files, I'd label folders with the name and dimensions.

The only change I'd consider to the file name is adding the date as a series of numbers, like 011813, or possibly with the year first for sorting through lists.

I make a new folder and new Lightroom catalog for every shoot. That keep all the parts of each shooting the same place, and it's easy to backup. I also keep a few master catalogs that are collections of the best of from each shoot where I've exported  the files and previews, but not the source files.

Oh yes, I do prefix all filenames with YYYYMM, but not the day.  That's because I shoot a lot of 3 day events.

I used to use the day, but that caused a fiasco TWICE because the I usually go a day early and sometimes the celebrities throw a private party or impromptu dinner/event the day before.  People who bought "all access" VIP tickets see my photos with the date, then make an angry call to the event organizer claiming they were cheated because the event started a day earlier than they were told.  If they just see the photos without a date, they just think it was a something that happened during the allotted time, but they just weren't there at that particular moment.

Jan 18 13 12:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Kerrek
Posts: 1,387
Orlando, Florida, US


Jan 18 13 12:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Fryd
Posts: 3,421
Miami Beach, Florida, US


There are lots of reasonable strategies.  Here's mine:

I use Photo Mechanic to ingest the files from the memory cards.  Photo Mechanic renames the file to YYYYMMDD-seqn, and adds IPTC keyword and captioning information identifying the client and the job.  After the images are ingested I may go back and add additional IPTC information identifying describing the image.

For instance a single image may be named 20130119-001.jpg

If I have multiple jobs in the same day, I use different blocks of sequence numbers.  If needed I use 4 digit sequence numbers.

For a project that spans multiple days, I do not reset the sequence number each day.  If the last photo of a day was 20121215-345, the first photo of the next day is 20121216-346

If I edit an image, I add a suffix describe the version.
20121216-346-8x10.jpg, 20121216-346-BW, 20121216-346-adj, etc.

I use one folder for each project, and generally organize my archives by date.

The goal is that every image should have a unique filename.

The secondary goal is that when dealing with clients we can refer to the images by the sequence number. (i.e. the client can say he wants images -037, -045 and -099-BW)



Finding an image is easy.

I use a Mac, so it automatically indexes all the files and associated IPTC info.  The built-in find command can search through filenames, IPTC data, creation dates and find me the image I am looking for.   I assume that Windows has equivalent functionality.


A search for all images of a particular model taken during a specified date range generally takes less than 3 seconds.

Similarly, I can look for images taken for a certain client at a particular location (optionally during a particular date range).

The key is proper keywording. 

Of course, this is a temporary solution to get me through the next 5 to 7 years.  My expectation is that in 5 years, I won't need to label my images, my computer will use image recognition to automatically identify people, scenes, etc. so I won't need to identify the subject matter.
Jan 19 13 05:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
D-Light
Posts: 546
Newcastle, Limerick, Ireland


I batch rename the images, using a name relevent to the shoot and numbered in sequence. I fill in the meta data, not just the template but the extra details, like customer name, date of shoot, keywords, etc.

These are then placed in a folder, containing all the images for that year. It goes into a sub folder, for the type of work it is, model ports, fashion shoots, commercial, schools, etc.. It then goes into another subfolder, for that job only.

I have about 270,000 images and I've learned from experience that badly filed images cann't be found without a lot of work.
Jan 19 13 05:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Fryd
Posts: 3,421
Miami Beach, Florida, US


Jan 19 13 01:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,728
Santa Ana, California, US


Dale at Killer Image wrote:

Oh yes, I do prefix all filenames with YYYYMM, but not the day.  That's because I shoot a lot of 3 day events.

I used to use the day, but that caused a fiasco TWICE because the I usually go a day early and sometimes the celebrities throw a private party or impromptu dinner/event the day before.  People who bought "all access" VIP tickets see my photos with the date, then make an angry call to the event organizer claiming they were cheated because the event started a day earlier than they were told.  If they just see the photos without a date, they just think it was a something that happened during the allotted time, but they just weren't there at that particular moment.

Wouldn't using the start day (regardless of term), resolve that issue. Fairly easy I'd think to convey that the date always represented the start date.

Jan 19 13 01:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Fryd
Posts: 3,421
Miami Beach, Florida, US


John Allan wrote:

Wouldn't using the start day (regardless of term), resolve that issue. Fairly easy I'd think to convey that the date always represented the start date.

This is a good solution.

I use the day that image was shot because the automated tools make it trivial to rename the image to the date it was shot.  That way I don't have to remember to enter the date each time I ingest images.

Jan 19 13 02:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Pawel Piatek
Posts: 2
London, England, United Kingdom


Agree with -JAY-
Jan 19 13 02:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
fine art nudes by paul
Posts: 3,276
San Jose, California, US


yyyymmdd_hhmmss_xxxxxx.cr2 with the xxxxxx being the image file name from the camera.  This was done so that I could sort by date (my website when i had it sorted by date with most recent photos displayed first), but also preemptively so that if I were running two cameras for whatever reason as long as the camera's clocks were synced the files would always end up in order chronologically.  I never have used that since I've never used two cameras simultaneously.

That's the only filename management I do, everything else is handled through aperture folders where a model shoot for example would be in a folder called models followed my a folder for the model and then a project for each shoot using the date in yymmdd format.  Since the vast majority of my shoots are single models that works well, in the case of two or more models I either create a folder with both names, or a folder based on the shoot itself.  For now this seems to work.

As for non-model shoots, I follow mostly the same structure conventions, weddings when I did them were in a folder called weddings followed by the couples name, landscapes (which are mostly shot while on vacation/camping trips) are in misc - places - trip name/date - location name.  Occasionally I deviate and do misc - places - place name - date, for example if i happen to be somewhere and shoot some random shots I'll just pull them out of the project and create a small project with just those photos, this is usually how i do it for random landscapey shots or misc shots that I get while shooting something else, like during a photo shoot.  Actual trips follow the previous structure format.  For events and commercial stuff I have a folder called work and then either the client name or the event.  Events usually only house the one event, unless it's a recurring event or client at which it's work - event/client - date.
Jan 19 13 04:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,174
Salem, Oregon, US


what i need is something that will search all my external hard drives, including the ones that aren't currently plugged into my computer. it is getting harder to find old shoots although generally customers don't come back to order more anyway.

using aperture/lightroom libraries to organize is ok but you wind up with a lot of libraries (because of overloading and corruption problems and just to keep things sane) and then it gets harder. it's like you need a meta-library or something.

i think what i need is an assistant. go find the shoot i did with that tall model from arizona with the blue dress. she had these amazing ...

aperture can rename files on import. maybe i should try that.

but i'm really thinking deliver and be done with it. don't even bother to keep old shoots around. just keep moving forward. but maybe that's too draconian.
Jan 19 13 05:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


twoharts wrote:
what i need is something that will search all my external hard drives, including the ones that aren't currently plugged into my computer. it is getting harder to find old shoots although generally customers don't come back to order more anyway.

using aperture/lightroom libraries to organize is ok but you wind up with a lot of libraries (because of overloading and corruption problems and just to keep things sane) and then it gets harder. it's like you need a meta-library or something.

i think what i need is an assistant. go find the shoot i did with that tall model from arizona with the blue dress. she had these amazing ...

aperture can rename files on import. maybe i should try that.

but i'm really thinking deliver and be done with it. don't even bother to keep old shoots around. just keep moving forward. but maybe that's too draconian.

What I'm about to is archive (to Blu-ray) all of my older full-size .JPGs and RAW files, keeping the 920x920 versions on my hard drive, so when I need an older file I will know exactly what I have before I pull out the disk catalogs.  And with the final resolution as part of the filename, I'll even know how big it can be printed before pulling it back to hard drives.


BTW, to search all hard drives (in Windows) open file explorer, click on "Computer" in the left panel, and enter search criteria in the upper right box.  Assuming you followed the filenaming conventions I outlined above, you can so wildcard searches.

Example:

Search "*Oscars2010*.jpg" to find all files with Oscars2010 in the filename.  If you have an external drive plugged in it will search that too.

Jan 21 13 05:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mask Photo
Posts: 1,382
Fremont, California, US


Dale at Killer Image wrote:
What I'm about to is archive (to Blu-ray) all of my older full-size .JPGs and RAW files, keeping the 920x920 versions on my hard drive, so when I need an older file I will know exactly what I have before

oh god, this sounds awful. Both from the time it'll take to make the discs and the time it'll take to retrieve. A 3 TB hard drive costs under $200:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductLi … d%20higher

a 3TB drive holds the same amount of data as 60 dual-layer blu-ray discs.
50 of them will cost you $180.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductLi … 050%20Pack

So you have zero cost benefit (actually a cost detriment), and you have to spend time cataloging and writing 60 discs. Just get a new drive...?


Dale at Killer Image wrote:
BTW, to search all hard drives (in Windows)....

I prefer the amazing search tool "Everything".
http://download.cnet.com/Everything/300 … 90746.html

can be made to run in the background on log-on (accessible with hotkeys) via task scheduler:
http://www.voidtools.com/faq.php#How_do … em_startup

Jan 21 13 05:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


Mask Photo wrote:

Dale at Killer Image wrote:
What I'm about to is archive (to Blu-ray) all of my older full-size .JPGs and RAW files, keeping the 920x920 versions on my hard drive, so when I need an older file I will know exactly what I have before

oh god, this sounds awful. Both from the time it'll take to make the discs and the time it'll take to retrieve. A 3 TB hard drive costs under $200:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductLi … d%20higher

a 3TB drive holds the same amount of data as 60 dual-layer blu-ray discs.
50 of them will cost you $180.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductLi … 050%20Pack

So you have zero cost benefit (actually a cost detriment), and you have to spend time cataloging and writing 60 discs. Just get a new drive...?



I prefer the amazing search tool "Everything".
http://download.cnet.com/Everything/300 … 90746.html

can be made to run in the background on log-on (accessible with hotkeys) via task scheduler:
http://www.voidtools.com/faq.php#How_do … em_startup

I currently rotate between 2 3TB backup drives, but they are full. Also, it's a 30 hour job to copy from my internal drive to my 3TB external, and much of that data is the huge RAW files from photoshoots years ago.  So if I archive THOSE to blu-ray and take them out of the backup cycle forever, I'm good.  External blu-ray burners are under $100 (bought at Black Friday sale) and blanks are under $1 (they are on sale most of the time at Frys) (holding 23GB after formatting), so that seems like the better way to go. 

Otherwise I have to buy TWO more 3TB drives, and keep copying huge files that I'll mostly never need again.

Jan 21 13 06:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bay Photo
Posts: 734
Brooklyn, New York, US


Jan 21 13 06:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Darryl Varner
Posts: 676
Lexington, Kentucky, US


Folders with project name and date. Final edits go into a sub-folder called 'processed'. Since the original images are left intact in the main folder, finding info about how a particular photo was shot isn't an issue.
Jan 21 13 06:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JAE
Posts: 2,075
West Chester, Pennsylvania, US


I put each shoot/event/whatever in a folder with the format "YYYY.MM.DD - Description".  That will list everything in chronological order which makes it easy to find for me.  Each shoot folder has a subfolder called "edits" for the processed photos.
Jan 21 13 06:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jeffries Photography
Posts: 117
Long Beach, California, US


I do it through light room, each year I do a new catalog.

As for folder set up:
Year > [monthday]_[shoot name or model name] > [shoot name or model name]-#.cr2

example: 2013 > 0119_beaumont > beaumont-1.cr2

That way I can search for anything using lightroom as long as I am in the correct catalog. Been working well now for about 4 years.
Jan 21 13 06:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
FiveOne November
Posts: 169
Rochester, New York, US


Let's all agree on one thing.  An asset isn't an asset unless it can be found and retrieved, regardless of ad-hoc or systematic archiving methods or systems we use.  Now that half of you (especially the models) completely disagree, I'll plow forward anyway.  smile

Lessons learned from the broadcast industry can be applied here, though few of us can likely afford the asset management software and hardware they use.  What is most important is that in order to find an asset with a "yellow scarf"' that one have the ability to put "yellow scarf" in the EXIF or MXF data fields so it can be found later on.  It seems like every digital camera comes with some sort of software that affords this ability.  The challenge is actually entering the data.  it requires discipline.  The hard part is what happens to the media that goes offline? How can that be searched?

I use an SDLT backup drive that is MXF-aware.  The search functions allow for the retrieval of specific files (and only those files) that contain descriptive content that matches the search string.  That is why it is so important to enter data in fields as much as possible.  Where many folks express dismay at having to enter descriptive data as it "slows down the production process", it really does speed up the retrieval process!

I'm curious if anyone knows an application that keeps offline content searchable.  In broadcast, there's Strawberry and Dalet.  Those would work for photographers, but they ain't priced on a photog's budget.  For Mac users, there's always Final Cut Server, which is iTunes on steroids. Or there was.

Anyway, the file name wouldn't matter as long as enough attention was given to the content of the file.  Date, model, client, yellow scarf, etc...
Jan 21 13 07:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dale at Killer Image
Posts: 597
San Diego, California, US


FiveOne November wrote:
I'm curious if anyone knows an application that keeps offline content searchable.

This is the heart of my filenaming scheme... I'm making descriptive file names, with the resolution, and permanently keeping the 920x920 resized version of every photo on my hard drives.  They average about 250k, and that's enough resolution to see the quality (or lack thereof) of the image and knowing the original resolution before taking the time to pull it from archives.

Jan 23 13 08:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Abbitt Photography
Posts: 11,336
Oakland Acres, Iowa, US


I use a numbering scheme that seems to work well for me. 

The first number of any image designates a theme.   Local landscapes may be 500 series, sailing shots may be 600 series, etc.   512-1, for example would be the first local landscape photo I took in 2012.

My art models all start with 1.  So the first image of my fist art model is 101-1.  All the photos of that model are in a folder labeled 101 and that model's name.

The number therefore gives me a good idea of what the general subject is, when the photo was taken and what folder I will find the photo in.
Jan 23 13 10:13 am  Link  Quote 
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