login info join!
Forums > Critique > i already know i am a newbie.. thats not new Search   Reply
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Looking for intuitive critique. I get it that I have a long road of improvement ahead of me, what type common issue/error do you seen in my shots. (I am aware of some crop mistakes already regards to limbs.) Do you like my night shots and locations i pick in them? I am not looking for glamor modeling shots, but more artistic look using DOF in good location.  Is MM a wrong place for me then?
Jan 18 13 01:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
E e v a
Posts: 1,724
Nashville, Tennessee, US


You tend to center your subjects in the camera too much. You like to shoot too safely and too cliche. Also, think of it this way. this is model mayhem. This is not landscape sunset photographer with random person thrown in there mayhem. If you want your port to work here, you need to sell some sort of shot a model would want in their port. Currently your work makes your subjects look bland. Step up your game more.

Lastly, take the advice from those who critiqued you in the last thread, and no more excuses. Just work on it or ignore it.
Jan 18 13 01:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RachelReilly
Posts: 1,699
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Your photos are boring due to lack of editing, attention to detail (cropping)
And your llamas poses and expressions are incredibly dull.
What kind of photography did you want to get onto?
Jan 18 13 01:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RachelReilly
Posts: 1,699
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Edit
Jan 18 13 01:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,113
Tampa, Florida, US


Here's what I immediately notice...

You've very interested in environmental portraits and editorial-style shots. I like that.

You use all natural lighting (which may be a preference or the fact that you haven't ventured into the world of strobes) but either way, I like that too.

You definitely have a creative vision and look for alternative shots than the standard ones presented to you. I like that.

I have no idea how long you've been a photographer but I like your portfolio and style. I would work on the technical - lighting mostly because some of the images, though creative, are a bit flat and could use more dimension as well as composition (cropping).

Overall, I think you're doing a lot more right than wrong.
Jan 18 13 01:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,113
Tampa, Florida, US


Sasha R Expressions  wrote:
Looking for intuitive critique. I get it that I have a long road of improvement ahead of me, what type common issue/error do you seen in my shots. (I am aware of some crop mistakes already regards to limbs.) Do you like my night shots and locations i pick in them? I am not looking for glamor modeling shots, but more artistic look using DOF in good location.  Is MM a wrong place for me then?

MM isn't just sexy women in thongs and glamour-style shots. And MM isn't about succumbing to pressure to produce a certain style. Develop your own style. Yes, most males enjoy viewing glamour-style shots, but we also appreciate quality images, regardless of the content.

And if you're in doubt...slap a female model in some yoga pants, get her on all fours and have arch her back...and you're in the club.

Jan 18 13 01:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,808
New York, New York, US


Michael Pandolfo wrote:

MM isn't just sexy women in thongs and glamour-style shots. And MM isn't about succumbing to pressure to produce a certain style. Develop your own style. Yes, most males enjoy viewing glamour-style shots, but we also appreciate quality images, regardless of the content.

And if you're in doubt...slap a female model in some yoga pants, get her on all fours and have arch her back...and you're in the club.

+100

Jan 18 13 01:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
L Raye
Posts: 4,992
Petaluma, California, US


I second what Michael said above.

Here is an example:

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/10/50f84281a0609_m.jpg

If your model had turned her head to her left a bit, you could have gotton some light on her shadowed cheek, and maybe some catchlights in her eyes.

I'm not sure why you have a chopped off plane in the background.  I don't think it adds anything to the image.  For a portrait, use a shallower DOF to blur it out, or change the composition to eliminate it.

If you do want to include the plane to try to make a story, maybe change the position of your model and include more of the plane?

But keep on shooting, look at the results, compare them to others work that you admire, and try to figure out the differences.  Again and again.
Jan 18 13 02:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DOUGLASFOTOS
Posts: 8,051
Los Angeles, California, US


Please Sasha...Look here...

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=876030


Just like your other thread about Critique's....IF you ask...they will come.
Jan 18 13 02:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Michael Pandolfo wrote:
Here's what I immediately notice...

You've very interested in environmental portraits and editorial-style shots. I like that.

You use all natural lighting (which may be a preference or the fact that you haven't ventured into the world of strobes) but either way, I like that too.

You definitely have a creative vision and look for alternative shots than the standard ones presented to you. I like that.

I have no idea how long you've been a photographer but I like your portfolio and style. I would work on the technical - lighting mostly because some of the images, though creative, are a bit flat and could use more dimension as well as composition (cropping).

Overall, I think you're doing a lot more right than wrong.

So this is a very helpful and positive critique. Thanks for your response. I am not using any additional equipment due to the lack of it. I have been only shooting for about a year. Started off doing night landscape shots, but now had some chances to photograph some of my friends.(not models) I don't know what exact direction this will lead me yet. I like shooting with my prime lens.

Jan 18 13 02:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


DOUGLASFOTOS wrote:
Please Sasha...Look here...

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=876030


Just like your other thread about Critique's....IF you ask...they will come.

i am not complaining. this has been very helpful to me. things i need to hear early to improve upon. even if i don't agree with some of the criticism, i will keep it in mind anyway.

Jan 18 13 02:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


L Raye wrote:
I second what Michael said above.

Here is an example:

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/10/50f84281a0609_m.jpg

If your model had turned her head to her left a bit, you could have gotton some light on her shadowed cheek, and maybe some catchlights in her eyes.

I'm not sure why you have a chopped off plane in the background.  I don't think it adds anything to the image.  For a portrait, use a shallower DOF to blur it out, or change the composition to eliminate it.

If you do want to include the plane to try to make a story, maybe change the position of your model and include more of the plane?

But keep on shooting, look at the results, compare them to others work that you admire, and try to figure out the differences.  Again and again.

Very helpful points I didn't think of. Thanks!!!

Jan 18 13 02:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Michael Pandolfo wrote:

MM isn't just sexy women in thongs and glamour-style shots. And MM isn't about succumbing to pressure to produce a certain style. Develop your own style. Yes, most males enjoy viewing glamour-style shots, but we also appreciate quality images, regardless of the content.

And if you're in doubt...slap a female model in some yoga pants, get her on all fours and have arch her back...and you're in the club.

Well I am glad. Because some people told me to do glamor shots, if they are not, then my work is not good or something. That confused me, later they told me to think outside the box. I thought I was.

Jan 18 13 02:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Samantha Emme wrote:
You tend to center your subjects in the camera too much. You like to shoot too safely and too cliche. Also, think of it this way. this is model mayhem. This is not landscape sunset photographer with random person thrown in there mayhem. If you want your port to work here, you need to sell some sort of shot a model would want in their port. Currently your work makes your subjects look bland. Step up your game more.

Lastly, take the advice from those who critiqued you in the last thread, and no more excuses. Just work on it or ignore it.

Thanks, I am very much curios, which shots are cliche so I don't repeat them. Standing plain in front of the camera? The models pose makes them so? my choice of angle?

Jan 18 13 02:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
L Raye
Posts: 4,992
Petaluma, California, US


Sasha R Expressions  wrote:
Very helpful points I didn't think of. Thanks!!!

And remember, at this stage of your photography, your equipment isn't the limiting factor to your images.  It is your vision and technique.  So keep at it!

Jan 18 13 02:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
E e v a
Posts: 1,724
Nashville, Tennessee, US


Sasha R Expressions  wrote:
Thanks, I am very much curios, which shots are cliche so I don't repeat them. Standing plain in front of the camera? The models pose makes them so? my choice of angle?

Which shots? Most nearly all of them except the ones with the airplane. Those I cant say are really cliche. What makes the others cliche is a combination of things. the poses are cliche at times, but those aren't so much your fault. The models don't have any expression really as well, but also not your fault. I'd say the angles, the common backgrounds, and just the general feel seems a little hipster-y, like you're trying to stand out, but not. I want to see some real emotive shots that tell a story beyond some guy sitting on a sidewalk.

Jan 18 13 02:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
E e v a
Posts: 1,724
Nashville, Tennessee, US


Double =/
Jan 18 13 02:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
HO Photo
Posts: 515
Los Angeles, California, US


Holy crap, there are some harsh replies! You're doing nice work for a new photographer. My advice is: 1) keep shooting as much as possible, 2) look at as much other work as you can and try to think critically about why you like it or don't like it, and 3) try to imitate everything you like!

Don't worry about getting super creative or complex. Right now you need steady shooting to improve your eye, your compositional choices, and your technique. By all appearances, you're off to a good start on every account. Your photos might have been described as "boring" above, but they're certainly not BAD photos in my opinion.

Just. Keep. At it. smile
Jan 18 13 02:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Haseeb Omar Photo wrote:
Holy crap, there are some harsh replies! You're doing nice work for a new photographer. My advice is: 1) keep shooting as much as possible, 2) look at as much other work as you can and try to think critically about why you like it or don't like it, and 3) try to imitate everything you like!

Don't worry about getting super creative or complex. Right now you need steady shooting to improve your eye, your compositional choices, and your technique. By all appearances, you're off to a good start on every account. Your photos might have been described as "boring" above, but they're certainly not BAD photos in my opinion.

Just. Keep. At it. smile

Thanks for your positive opinion!!

Jan 18 13 03:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chronos Creations
Posts: 353
Benidorm, Valencia, Spain


The advice I give is all coming from the perspective that you are using Model Mayhem for its purpose; to show pics of models at their best.

"Is MM a wrong place for me then?"
This is the right place for any photographer who uses models


Everyone here is giving you feedback on the basis of being a model/portrait styled photographer. I am not originally this type of photographer, my main style is similar to yours, where the whole picture is the subject, rather than just the model.

But I agree with their opinions. This site is to attract models and photographers to one another, and the best way to do that is to upload photos that show what you can do for them. Models need to show their body, legs, and how many expressions they can do and how well etc, whereas photographers need to show all the styles they can do, and how well they can portray a model's figure and expression within that style.

As a photographer, if I had taken the pics you have present on your port, I'd be glad to show some of those on my own site to demonstrate my creativity of "using the best of what you've got with natural light". But have a think about this; Would a model use it in their portfolio? Baring in mind the picture of the model has to show her body, flexibility, expressions, and anything else that will separate her from other models. Taking pics of beautiful scenarios only help a photographer in his career as a landscape photographer, not the model, and wont help you on this site.

I checked out the other thread too since you've started one before. That first comment about your model's face not having enough light does makes sense to me. Some photos on your port have the models too dark, but I have a different solution than he does. He talks about making the exposure on the model right, but when you do that it tends to make the background extremely overexposed. My advice is that all you need is to use a reflector to manipulate the light by bouncing it back onto the darker sides of the model, then you can have good exposure on the background and the model doesn't have to be too far into the dark.
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/08/50f8213272c44_m.jpg
I was reading from the other thread about you making the abs on this pic just exposed enough to show them and that's why the face wasn't so bright. Using a reflector to bounce some light onto the face would make this pic much closer to perfect for a model, and to me.



http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/120630/09/4fef2a8816691_m.jpg
Shots like this show off your creativity as a photographer, capturing the light off the water during the night, but unfortunately does nothing for a model. A model couldn't use this in her port as it hardly shows off her body and you can't even see her eyes. It is wasted on this website.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/22/50f8ee61cdbef_m.jpg
I'd say this is your best shot of a model in your port, as it shows more of what you can do for a model. It brings out nice features that she has, with good exposure, and I understand why your aperture here looks wide open, at night it's hard to get enough light to make it bright enough (then again a reflector would help smile ) but your best pic and my favourite pic are two different things!

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/09/50f83ba094000_m.jpg
As a musician myself, this is definitely my favorite pic big_smile album cover right there! Not a bad photo for a model either if it was a bit more cropped.



By the way, I read somewhere on the other thread about you having an entry level camera. Nothing is wrong with the Canon Rebel t2i (or the Canon EOS 550d in Europe), it is what I use! I have always used the 550d for my photography. Just because other cameras are better doesn't mean you can't capture amazing photos with it. It has all the features for doing beautiful photos. It still kicks ass and at a very humble price wink

One last piece of advice. on your "About Me", make sure you use correct spelling (I noticed a few missing capital letters, and one spelling of "thru" tongue ) and no slang as it shows lack of professionalism. Also try to make it shorter, about 3 to 5 short paragraphs long (about 3/4 lines each). Shorter paragraphs are easier to read and there's less chance of someone getting bored while reading it and moving onto a different photographer. I do like your honesty in the description though!

Overall for someone that's only been doing photography for a year, I think you're on the right track for your style. Do not be compelled to join everyone else in glamour just because they say so. This site is filled with portrait photographers and most will judge you on the fact that you don't do any studio stuff. Just start using a reflector (either buy a cheap online for a few bucks or use some sort of white board), and you'll be doing fantastic shots that people can appreciate in no time!

Just my 2cent x100 big_smile 2bucks!
Jan 19 13 12:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Shon D.- Homme
Posts: 3,185
Virginia Beach, Virginia, US


I don't have a lot to say, but I really think you're off to a great start. I can see that you're TRYING to do something. I see creativity. I see thought. Keep it up.
Jan 19 13 12:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,113
Tampa, Florida, US


Sasha R Expressions  wrote:
Well I am glad. Because some people told me to do glamor shots, if they are not, then my work is not good or something. That confused me, later they told me to think outside the box. I thought I was.

Well that really depends on your expectations with MM. Glamour shots and Nudes will get the most attention and most comments. It's not a statement that means only Glamour shots are good but they tend to attract more attention and thus responses.

It also depends on the type of models you're looking to network and work with. If you have no interest in glamour then there's no point trying to attract models with glamour-style shots.

I have a different motivation for MM so my opinion may not be the typical or popular view. I don't often use MM as a source for obtaining models and I'm not trying to attract attention so I don't cater my portfolio to get comments. I find it incredibly entertaining and a source of knowledge.

I do very little glamour work. It's mostly lifestyle. But, yes, I did add a glamour image or two (I think?) just so I wouldn't be run out of the community and be called a Socialist.

The bottom line (I believe) is shoot what you love to shoot and your style will develop. Don't alter what you enjoy just to make an audience happy (unless they're paying you a shit-ton).

You've only been shooting a year and I see creativity, thought, and a desire to  experiment. Work on the technical and lighting and really think about composition and intricate details (a light pole or puddle that distracts from that gorgeous musician) and what you want the viewer to see and work on those areas.

Jan 19 13 12:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ELiffmann
Posts: 1,394
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, US


Here's a couple of things; right off in your profile you say you're using an entry level camera.  Context matters, people are going to assume your photos are entry-level because of this when in actuality your camera is way better than what pros were using 10-15 yrs ago(I'm talking digital here...).  No sense in incriminating yourself.  In this one, I'd crop out the building on the left.  You want to think about how your eye moves around a photo.  Things like a stark contrast will draw the eye, in this case away from your hot friend towards a slice of building and a blank sky.  I like the direction of your stuff... http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/121229/09/50df2973edff8_m.jpg
Jan 19 13 01:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chronos Creations
Posts: 353
Benidorm, Valencia, Spain


BTW I know what Samantha is saying about your pics being "cliché" but wouldn't worry about that right now. Everyone starts at cliché, that's why they are what they are! When you master those angles and shots, you can then experiment how to not make shots cliché.

Your port says you've only been a photographer for about a year and all the girls on your pics are just friends, not models. Things like being cliché are going to happen.
Jan 20 13 12:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Chronos Productions wrote:
The advice I give is all coming from the perspective that you are using Model Mayhem for its purpose; to show pics of models at their best.

"Is MM a wrong place for me then?"
This is the right place for any photographer who uses models


Everyone here is giving you feedback on the basis of being a model/portrait styled photographer. I am not originally this type of photographer, my main style is similar to yours, where the whole picture is the subject, rather than just the model.

But I agree with their opinions. This site is to attract models and photographers to one another, and the best way to do that is to upload photos that show what you can do for them. Models need to show their body, legs, and how many expressions they can do and how well etc, whereas photographers need to show all the styles they can do, and how well they can portray a model's figure and expression within that style.

As a photographer, if I had taken the pics you have present on your port, I'd be glad to show some of those on my own site to demonstrate my creativity of "using the best of what you've got with natural light". But have a think about this; Would a model use it in their portfolio? Baring in mind the picture of the model has to show her body, flexibility, expressions, and anything else that will separate her from other models. Taking pics of beautiful scenarios only help a photographer in his career as a landscape photographer, not the model, and wont help you on this site.

I checked out the other thread too since you've started one before. That first comment about your model's face not having enough light does makes sense to me. Some photos on your port have the models too dark, but I have a different solution than he does. He talks about making the exposure on the model right, but when you do that it tends to make the background extremely overexposed. My advice is that all you need is to use a reflector to manipulate the light by bouncing it back onto the darker sides of the model, then you can have good exposure on the background and the model doesn't have to be too far into the dark.
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/08/50f8213272c44_m.jpg
I was reading from the other thread about you making the abs on this pic just exposed enough to show them and that's why the face wasn't so bright. Using a reflector to bounce some light onto the face would make this pic much closer to perfect for a model, and to me.



http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/120630/09/4fef2a8816691_m.jpg
Shots like this show off your creativity as a photographer, capturing the light off the water during the night, but unfortunately does nothing for a model. A model couldn't use this in her port as it hardly shows off her body and you can't even see her eyes. It is wasted on this website.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/22/50f8ee61cdbef_m.jpg
I'd say this is your best shot of a model in your port, as it shows more of what you can do for a model. It brings out nice features that she has, with good exposure, and I understand why your aperture here looks wide open, at night it's hard to get enough light to make it bright enough (then again a reflector would help smile ) but your best pic and my favourite pic are two different things!

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130117/09/50f83ba094000_m.jpg
As a musician myself, this is definitely my favorite pic big_smile album cover right there! Not a bad photo for a model either if it was a bit more cropped.



By the way, I read somewhere on the other thread about you having an entry level camera. Nothing is wrong with the Canon Rebel t2i (or the Canon EOS 550d in Europe), it is what I use! I have always used the 550d for my photography. Just because other cameras are better doesn't mean you can't capture amazing photos with it. It has all the features for doing beautiful photos. It still kicks ass and at a very humble price wink

One last piece of advice. on your "About Me", make sure you use correct spelling (I noticed a few missing capital letters, and one spelling of "thru" tongue ) and no slang as it shows lack of professionalism. Also try to make it shorter, about 3 to 5 short paragraphs long (about 3/4 lines each). Shorter paragraphs are easier to read and there's less chance of someone getting bored while reading it and moving onto a different photographer. I do like your honesty in the description though!

Overall for someone that's only been doing photography for a year, I think you're on the right track for your style. Do not be compelled to join everyone else in glamour just because they say so. This site is filled with portrait photographers and most will judge you on the fact that you don't do any studio stuff. Just start using a reflector (either buy a cheap online for a few bucks or use some sort of white board), and you'll be doing fantastic shots that people can appreciate in no time!

Just my 2cent x100 big_smile 2bucks!

very very helpful!! Thank you so much. A lot of information about details. I do have a 5in1 Reflector kit, but just haven't been able to have an extra hand. Would it seem "ghetto" to models if I rig it or prop it during the session using my second camera tripod? I will take your advice and some other people's in regards to working in the direction I enjoy best. I read online somewhere that photos should not be cropped, but more and more I get that comment. Sometime I am afraid to crop the photo because I am unaware of cropping rules regards to shape or what not. I see you point about the pic where there is a building to the left slightly showing. Yes very good point, never thought about it like that. Thanks so much again for such informative critique.

Jan 21 13 08:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


I say entry level camera because of technical classifications of what it can do compared to the market. Not even a full frame sensor. BUT, the more I use it, the more I fine tune the settings, the more it starting to impress me. I need to get good glass too, that will improve my camera as well.
Jan 21 13 08:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chronos Creations
Posts: 353
Benidorm, Valencia, Spain


Sasha R Expressions  wrote:
very very helpful!! Thank you so much. A lot of information about details. I do have a 5in1 Reflector kit, but just haven't been able to have an extra hand. Would it seem "ghetto" to models if I rig it or prop it during the session using my second camera tripod? I will take your advice and some other people's in regards to working in the direction I enjoy best. I read online somewhere that photos should not be cropped, but more and more I get that comment. Sometime I am afraid to crop the photo because I am unaware of cropping rules regards to shape or what not. I see you point about the pic where there is a building to the left slightly showing. Yes very good point, never thought about it like that. Thanks so much again for such informative critique.

I always use a tripod to hold it in place if I haven't got an extra set of hands, actualy its a microphone stand lol, works well, sometimes i prefer a stand as i can put it exactly where I want without fear of an assistant moving slightly.

One time a year ago, for a picture outside I needed to use a tripod for the cam but forgot to bring an extra for the reflector. I did not have much equipment, just the camera, tripod, and reflector. Luckily my Canon 550d (t2i) has Magic Lantern firmware installed on it (which I downloaded off the net, if you never used it be careful, if your cam breaks its not my fault! lol), because I do a lot of video recordings and that hack really helps out by making the camera more suitable for video, but it also has some extra features for photo, one being "Audio Remoteshot" which basically means if you clap your hands, or make any sharp noise, it will take a picture. So I put the camera in place for the certain photos, and held the reflector in place to bounce the light and basically clicked my tongue (I can click it as loud as clapping lol) to take the photos tongue a bit unorthodox but it worked and made some interesting shots with the help of the reflector!

That thing that people say about not cropping photos. What they mean is you should think about how you want your pic to look while taking it, so that you don't have to crop it, although having said that, sometimes it's a lot easier to see how a pic should be after the pic is taken lol. For example, if your taking a pic of a car and a building, but the building doesnt really work in the pic and the focus should just be the car, then take a pic of just the car, don't take a pic of the car and the building and then crop the building out after.

Jan 21 13 03:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chronos Creations
Posts: 353
Benidorm, Valencia, Spain


Sasha R Expressions  wrote:
I say entry level camera because of technical classifications of what it can do compared to the market. Not even a full frame sensor. BUT, the more I use it, the more I fine tune the settings, the more it starting to impress me. I need to get good glass too, that will improve my camera as well.

The kit lens will hold you back on this camera more than anything that the camera has to offer. The body itself is fine, doesn't have the most special equipment in the world, but that doesn't mean it doesn't produce special photos. The only thing that isn't very good is the lens. Change that and you'll see the camera becomes a whole new level of focus, and DOF.

BTW I'm still using the kit lens due to lack of funds. Being a musician as well as a photographer is a very expensive business! lol

Jan 21 13 03:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RogerLeonPhoto
Posts: 297
Tucson, Arizona, US


Umm, for a self described noob, I think your shots are pretty damned good!!  Good work! Sorry this is not a critique but I feel I should probably be much better than you to do so.
Jan 21 13 03:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


RogerLeonPhoto wrote:
Umm, for a self described noob, I think your shots are pretty damned good!!  Good work! Sorry this is not a critique but I feel I should probably be much better than you to do so.

Haa well thank you!!

Jan 21 13 06:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,808
New York, New York, US


Keep practicing, you can only get better if you do...It's about all I do is practice!...I still have a way to go myself so don't feel intimidated. Just keep hacking away at it...
Jan 21 13 07:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Shy L
Posts: 584
Burlington, Vermont, US


In general I think you need to work on your conversions and lighting, maybe WB as well.  But you have a good start and some of your images are very nice.  The toned abs one is my fav, and I think would make a better avatar.
Jan 21 13 07:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Marin Photography wrote:
Keep practicing, you can only get better if you do...It's about all I do is practice!...I still have a way to go myself so don't feel intimidated. Just keep hacking away at it...

Thanks!! I just broke down and paid sad for membership, just so I can add more photos. I couldn't decide which to delete to filter out for more photos.

Jan 21 13 10:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Russian Invasion
Posts: 136
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Shy L wrote:
In general I think you need to work on your conversions and lighting, maybe WB as well.  But you have a good start and some of your images are very nice.  The toned abs one is my fav, and I think would make a better avatar.

Thanks I did use it before, but was told its too dark for avatar. What do you think?

Jan 21 13 10:21 pm  Link  Quote 
  Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers