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Photographer
Dan Gregory Photography
Posts: 775
DEPTFORD, New Jersey, US


I'm looking to rebuild an old GT BMX and see that the frames are a decent price on ebay. I have never assembled a BMX before. So I guess my first statement would be, where do I get the screws for the wheels from?

And how does the seat post go in? Just push it?

Anyways any suggestions would be appreciated.
Jan 26 13 03:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
California Girls Skate
Posts: 342
Los Angeles, California, US


Dan Gregory Photography wrote:
I'm looking to rebuild an old GT BMX and see that the frames are a decent price on ebay. I have never assembled a BMX before. So I guess my first statement would be, where do I get the screws for the wheels from?

And how does the seat post go in? Just push it?

Anyways any suggestions would be appreciated.

The axles are already in the hubs. Just buy complete rims and you're all set.

However...

Axles come in two standard sizes - 3/8" and 14mm. You have to make sure your axle size matches the dropout size on the frame and fork. 14mm is a newer size. All the oldschool GT freestyle bikes were 3/8" axles. If you put on pegs, don't forget that 99% of rims are 26tpi on the thread count. But, for some odd reason, Skyway REAR rims (not the fronts, just the rears) are 24tpi. Don't try to put the 26tpi pegs on the 24tpi axle or you'll strip the thread.

Yes, the seatpost just slides in. But, again, those come in different sizes. 25.4mm on newer frames and 22.2mm on older frames. To take out the guesswork, you might want to invest $15 on a nice digital caliper if you don't have one. http://www.amazon.com/Neiko-01407A-Extr … B000GSLKIW

In addition to eBay, I'd suggest www.danscomp.com for parts. Note they are mainly newer parts, but there are some oldschool style things there too. www.ebikestop.com is pretty good too. You'll want to go on www.parktool.com for lots of instructional videos and tools. Trust me, you'll want a Bearing Cup Press to install the bottom bracket and the headset. You know the old saying "the right tool for the job" - if you try installing a bottom bracket or a headset without the right tools, it's a nightmare. With a press, it's easy as pie. I use the Bikehand YC-107.

Jan 26 13 04:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marc Damon
Posts: 6,562
Biloxi, Mississippi, US


Google "Mistress BMX"
Do whatever she says every time she cracks the whip with the Craftsman 7/8" combination wrench handle. You'll be fine. tongue


Srs. I bet there's a local bike shop who would be happy to answer all your questions intelligently if you buy a few of the parts you will obviously need from them. I mean, why buy a quality seat post online for $25 when you can get it locally for $27?
Jan 26 13 04:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MF productions
Posts: 2,017
San Jose, California, US


Take it to a shop and let them put it together. It will be cheaper and less of a pain .
Take my word for it.
Jan 26 13 05:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
EdwardKristopher
Posts: 3,348
Tempe, Arizona, US


/\  I agree!
Jan 26 13 06:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
California Girls Skate
Posts: 342
Los Angeles, California, US


Bike shops aren't a good resource for rebuilding '80's freestyle bikes, because most shops these days only know about road bikes and fixies. Even if you find a good BMX shop, they tend to only know modern bikes and, as I've noted, lots of technical specifications have changed in the last 25 years. Plus, no shop will stock all of these parts. Many parts will need to be special ordered. Bike shops with employees who are familiar with 25 year old bicycles are hard to come by. If you can find a good shop with a staff who have knowledge of '80's freestyle bikes, great! But finding such a shop might not be as easy as you think.
Jan 26 13 07:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Raoul Isidro Images
Posts: 5,975
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


The standard circumference of the the seat post as well as the front fork post has changed dramatically in just a decade. There are now so many different sizes, specially of the front fork with suspension that it is very difficult to obtain the right sizing just by looking at eBay alone.

I got a really cool front pneumatic shock absorber array with disk brakes that would only fit a certain brand or type of Hybrid Frame. It's been sitting on the garage waiting for the right eBay seller to part with their special frame....

.
Jan 26 13 08:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan Gregory Photography
Posts: 775
DEPTFORD, New Jersey, US


California Girls Skate wrote:
Bike shops aren't a good resource for rebuilding '80's freestyle bikes, because most shops these days only know about road bikes and fixies. Even if you find a good BMX shop, they tend to only know modern bikes and, as I've noted, lots of technical specifications have changed in the last 25 years. Plus, no shop will stock all of these parts. Many parts will need to be special ordered. Bike shops with employees who are familiar with 25 year old bicycles are hard to come by. If you can find a good shop with a staff who have knowledge of '80's freestyle bikes, great! But finding such a shop might not be as easy as you think.

How much do you think a shop would charge?

Jan 26 13 10:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
California Girls Skate
Posts: 342
Los Angeles, California, US


Dan Gregory Photography wrote:
How much do you think a shop would charge?

I have no idea. Like I said, you're talking about rebuilding a 25 year old bicycle, which means no shop will have all the parts you need.

How will you get the parts? Will you find the parts yourself and just have the shop assemble it? Will you have the shop hunt down the parts?

Those sort of variables are going to make a huge difference in costs.

I do all the work on my bicycles myself, so I couldn't even give you an estimate of what a shop would charge (except lacing a new hub - that was the one job I hired a bikeshop for, because I don't own a truing stand).

Jan 26 13 11:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Mr Windham
Posts: 1
Hemet, California, US


I used to be a sponsored bmxer and have worked in a shop,worst part about getting a old bmx together would have to be the wheel bearings if they are bad/cracking might as well get a new wheel but building a bike is fairly simple besides the brakes that effort could be considered an art form
Jan 27 13 01:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ACPhotography
Posts: 8,606
Plainview, New York, US


I was a sponsored racer, I was sponsored by a local bike shop which really helped as this was my last race bike, cost me $1200 in 1982 to put together...

GT expert frame, profile forks, cranks pedals. Mongoose rims with bullseye hubs and titanium spokes.

It's almost exactly how I raced it through the 80's and I'm actually intending to restore it to the way I raced it in 1982. This was a replacement for a Mongoose I raced in the late 70's till it was stolen, I eventually recovered that bike in pieces.

http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q77/RCAddict/DSC02096.jpg
Jan 28 13 07:06 am  Link  Quote 
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